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1.

Planet Earth II

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This 2016 follow-up to the 2006 documentary mini-series "Planet Earth" examines the natural features and wildlife found in various parts of the world, each of the six episodes corresponding to a different category of natural or man-made terrain (e.g., island, mountain, jungle, urban area, etc.).
DVD
2017; 2016
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

The Strange Disappearance of the Bees

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Documentary about mass deaths of bees all over the world. Increasingly each spring, beekeepers open their hives to find entire colonies wiped out. Surveys the science through conversations with top researchers such as entomologist May Berenbaum of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and biologist Paul Ehrlich of Stanford's Center for Conservation Biology. Makes a case that the industrial agricultural model is responsible for killing off the pollinators.
DVD
2011; 2010
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

Planet Earth: The Complete Series

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A stunning 11-part series that captures rare action, impossible locations, and intimate moments with our planet's best-loved, wildest, and most elusive creatures.
DVDBlu-Ray
2007
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

Planet Earth: The Complete Series

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A stunning 11-part series that captures rare action, impossible locations, and intimate moments with our planet's best-loved, wildest, and most elusive creatures.
DVD
2007
Clemons (Stacks)
5.

MicroCosmos: Le Peuple de L'herbe

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A wordless close-up view of a variety of the insects as they hatch from eggs, search for food and cope with a rain storm. Ants race to gather food as a pheasant gobbles them up while a dung beetle moves his prize up hill and down. Timelapse and mircophotographic techniques are used.
Laserdisc
1996
Ivy (By Request)
6.

The Joy of Science: Part V

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"These lucid, information-packed lectures convey the excitement of scientific discovery and trace the connections between discoveries over time. In this course, veteran science educator Robert Hazen renders the most complex ideas simple and memorable, without ever being simplistic"--www.teach12.com.
VHS
2001
Ivy (By Request)
7.

Biodiversity [electronic resource]

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Explains that with current extinction rates exceeding those of previous mass extinctions, many biodiversity studies focus on efforts to count the Earth's species before they are lost. Explores current field experiments studying complex ecosystems and how environmental and biodiversity changes might affect their functions.
Online
2003
8.

Material Cycles in Ecosystems [electronic resource]

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Explains why studying an ecosystem involves looking at interactions between living things as well as the nonliving environment that surrounds them. Explores material cycles as critical processes that sustain life in an ecosystem.
Online
2003
9.

The Secret World [electronic resource]

The Tara Oceans research team came together to better understand the marine world, arguably the most important ecosystem on Earth. This program lays the groundwork for their three-year expedition, introducing the personnel, their on-board lab, and their mission-to learn more about plankton, and to gain insight into the health of the planet as a result. Viewers travel with the crew as they sail the western Mediterranean searching for plankton colonies and observing microscopic interactions between phytoplankton and zooplankton. The team also maps out a plan to draw up a complete planktonic inventory.
Online
2010
10.

Man and the Oceans [electronic resource]

With no obvious predators to curb the population, humans are experiencing a growth in numbers that stands outside the laws of nature. What role does man play in the decreasing biodiversity of the earth, and of marine life in particular? In this program, the Tara Oceans researchers go to the Indian Ocean to investigate human influence on the health of the seas. Around the Austral Islands, the team finds copepods are being attacked by viruses, leading to speculation about the role of viruses in a balanced ecology. Sailing on, they encounter former fishing zones overrun by jellyfish and areas of damaged coral-troubling signs of rising oceanic temperatures.
Online
2010
11.

The Mountain Barrier [electronic resource]

Rising to heights of 13,000 feet, the Sarawat Mountains of Western Arabia extend for 1,000 miles along the entire length of the Red Sea, and are home to numerous species of wildlife. High juniper forests, fed by moisture rising from the Red Sea, support large troops of Hamadryas baboons, and exotic African birds such as the hornbill, Abyssinian roller, and thirteen other bird species found nowhere else in the world. The abandoned mountain village of al-Fawqa has become home to fruit bats, sunbirds, and weaver birds. In the vast volcanic moonscape that exists behind the mountain wall, spring growth provides a nursery for millions of migrating birds.
Online
1990
12.

Atacama [electronic resource]

The Atacama Desert in Chile is commonly known as the driest place on Earth. Studies by a group of British scientists have suggested that some riverbeds have been dry for 120,000 years. Once known for its rich deposits of copper and the world's largest natural supply of sodium nitrate, the desert is now home to the largest space observatory every built by man. Because of its high altitude, nearly non-existent cloud cover, dry air, and lack of light pollution and radio interference from the very widely spaced cities, the desert is one of the best places in the world to conduct astronomical observations.
Online
2011
13.

Thar [electronic resource]

The Thar - or Great Indian - Desert is the most densely populated desert in the world and has been inhabited for thousands of years. Huge windblown seas of sand dominate the desert with some dunes reaching close to 500 feet in height. Extreme temperature shifts, from near freezing to more than 120 degrees, make life difficult for all who call the Thar home.
Online
2011
14.

How Is Science Mapping Biodiversity? [electronic resource]

As an island nation in the Pacific, New Zealand is biologically diverse due to a number of very specific geologic, climatic, and geographic variables. In this episode, viewers will learn how these variables have affected New Zealand's flora and fauna and see how through the mapping of these changes we are better able to predict what the future may hold.
Online
2011
15.

Two Years in the Galápagos [electronic resource]

In May 1995, filmmakers David Parer and Elizabeth Parer-Cook arrived with their 3-year-old daughter, Zoe, on the Galápagos Islands to document the islands' natural beauty for television. During their two-year stay, they spent 500 days in the field - 200 of which were spent at sea, diving with whale sharks and hammerheads and exploring the islands of the archipelago. This is the charming and dramatic tale of how the family lived in this harsh environment and succeeded in capturing spectacular images of the Galápagos Islands and its wildlife.
Online
2000
16.

Protecting the Galapagos Islands [electronic resource]

Long before Darwin arrived in 1835, the Galapagos Islands were home to about 300,000 of the Galapagos giant tortoise, which can weigh up to 500 pounds and live for 150 years. Their numbers have now dwindled to 3,000, and the reason is: humans. This ABC News report investigates how an increase in tourism helps the economy but is endangering the islands' unique wildlife.
Online
2008
17.

Sam's Dare [electronic resource]: Why Are Bees Vanishing?

The honey bee has existed for 30 million years, but in 2007, colony collapse disorder caused the disappearance of up to 30 percent of the U.S. bee population. This ABC News report examines this disorder and the harrowing effects its continuation could have on agriculture worldwide. Corporations from around the globe are donating money to find the cause and remedy for this situation.
Online
2008
18.

Eye of the Camel [electronic resource]

The Rub' al Khalii, or Empty Quarter, is the immense sand desert in Southern Arabia. This film follows a Bedouin family on their winter migration into this desolate landscape and examines the desert animals and plants. Camels, gazelle, oryx, desert shrimp, plants, and insects have all adapted to cope with a life of extreme heat and no water. The wildlife at the ancient al-Hasa oasis offers a glimpse at life forms few even know exist. The impacts of the modern age on the ecology of the central Arabian deserts are also discussed?
Online
1990
19.

Fiji [electronic resource]

Situated in the South Pacific north of New Zealand, the Republic of Fiji was settled as far back as 3500 BC. With the help of foreign settlers, Ratu Seru Epenisa Cakobau united part of Fiji's warring tribes under his leadership and established a united Fijian kingdom in 1871. The British subjugated the island in 1874 and brought over Indian contract laborers. This film examines how, after gaining independence from British rule in 1971, Fiji has struggled to maintain political stability in spite of differences between the Fijian and Indo-Fijian people. With a culture that is a rich mosaic of Indigenous Fijian, Indo-Fijian, Asian, and European traditions, a unique way of life has developed on this beautiful island nation?
Online
2011
20.

The Galapagos [electronic resource]

Forged from volcanic eruptions deep below the seabed, the Galapagos Islands are home to some of most rare species in the world. This film explores this remarkable archipelago off the coast of Ecuador, where Charles Darwin studied the endemic species and formed his theory of evolution?
Online
2011