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1.

Agriculture

Before agriculture, early humans were hunter-gatherers, moving from place to place to follow herds of animals. The development of agriculture gave rise to the beginning of civilization and cities. Learn about the origins of agriculture, the science of soil, the needs of plants, farming techniques, and the future of farming.
Online
2018; 2013
2.

Amazon [electronic resource]: Land of the Flooded Forest

When seasonal rains sweep across South America, the Amazon River and its tributaries overflow their banks to create an ecosystem unlike any other-a place where, for six months out of each year, land-dwellers and water-dwellers mingle. This program joins an expert Amazon biologist in a journey into the flooded forests of the Amazon Basin to film dolphins navigating through treetops, a male "water monkey" releasing a cloud of babies from the nest in its mouth, and the usually lethargic three-toed sloth swimming agilely among branches. The video also explores the depletion of the region's natural resources, both by indigenous inhabitants struggling to survive and by outsiders eager to clear land for mass crop production.
Online
2009; 2002
3.

Aquatic Biomes [electronic resource]

Ranging from rivers and lakes, to wetlands and intertidal zones, to coral reefs and kelp forests, aquatic ecosystems are as diverse as the life-forms that inhabit them. This program introduces students to a variety of the world's aquatic biomes. The characteristics of saltwater and freshwater environments are clearly described, as are the plants and animals that call these watery regions home. The importance of evolution and adaptation for aquatic species is emphasized.
Online
2005; 2002
4.

Atacama [electronic resource]

The Atacama Desert in Chile is commonly known as the driest place on Earth. Studies by a group of British scientists have suggested that some riverbeds have been dry for 120,000 years. Once known for its rich deposits of copper and the world's largest natural supply of sodium nitrate, the desert is now home to the largest space observatory every built by man. Because of its high altitude, nearly non-existent cloud cover, dry air, and lack of light pollution and radio interference from the very widely spaced cities, the desert is one of the best places in the world to conduct astronomical observations.
Online
2011
5.

Breaking the Wall Around the Secrets of Our Origins [electronic resource]: How Early Hominids and Their Paleoenvironments Can Explain Our Species

This video from the 2009 Falling Walls Conference features Michel Brunet's lecture on how human paleontology holds the key to the origin of human life. Brunet is a professor of human paleontology and leads digs for fossil mammals and primates in Chad, Libya, Egypt, and Cameroon. Here he discusses his expedition in Central Africa, during which he discovered the skull and several jaws of a late Miocene hominid whose remains are believed to predate the earliest previously known hominid, Lucy, by more than three million years. Brunet gave it the nickname Toumaï, meaning "hope of life" in the local Goran language of Chad. What can the remains of a life lived millions of years ago tell us about how we live our lives today, and what does it mean that it originated in Africa?
Online
2009
6.

By River Into the Unknown [electronic resource]

Scientist, cartographer, and ecological pioneer, Alexander von Humboldt set himself a vast goal: "to find out how the forces of nature interact upon one another." This program follows the first two years of Humboldt and Bonpland's explorations as they charted rivers, gathered samples, and documented thousands of species of fauna and flora in Colombia, Cuba, and the Andes. Along with striking location footage, many of the expedition's original maps, manuscripts, and diverse specimens are seen in Berlin's Humboldt Museum for Natural History.
Online
2006; 1999
7.

Cauldron of Life

Liz Bonnin joins a scientific team aboard the research vessel Alucia on an expedition across the Galapágos Island. The journey begins on the Galapágos' west side at the youngest and most volcanically active islands in the archipelago, Isabela and Fernandina, which are home to a richly diverse wildlife scene. Here, Liz and the team journey into the clouds above Wolf, the tallest volcano in the Galapágos, where they join a group of biologists hunting for the elusive pink iguana. Back on the research vessel, Liz boards Alucia's Triton submersible to descend more than 3,000 feet into the ocean abyss in search of a new species hiding in the darkness. Liz also travels to Alcedo Volcano, in search of the largest population of giant tortoises. Finally, Liz helps out with a groundbreaking sci [...]
Online
2017
8.

Cuba [electronic resource]

In 1492, Christopher Columbus landed on what is now the island of Cuba and claimed it for Spain, and in a little over a century, the native population was virtually wiped out. Cuban culture is therefore influenced by a melting pot of cultures, primarily those of Spain and Africa due to the importation of slaves from that continent. This film explores this tropical outpost where, thanks to the island's physical isolation and closed society, it seems time has stood still for more that 50 years now.
Online
2011
9.

Cyprus [electronic resource]

Sitting in the eastern Mediterranean is the beautiful island of Cyprus. The earliest known human activity on the island dates to around the 10th millennium BC and occupiers have included the Greeks, Egyptians, Romans, and Ottomans. This film examines how the two distinct cultures of the island - Greek and Turkish Cypriots - coexist with little interchange. Thousands of miles of glittering coastline, hundreds of acres of broad, fertile plains set against a backdrop of dramatic mountain ranges, but Cyprus is a divided land with the Turkish military occupying the northern third of the island.
Online
2011
10.

Desert [electronic resource]: Land of Extremes

This Science Screen Report studies how deserts form and how organisms adapt to these harsh environments. Defining a desert as a vast area of windy, arid land, the program identifies the Gobi and Sahara as common examples as well as regions of the Arctic and Antarctic. It demonstrates that many of these supposed wastelands contain surprisingly high levels of biodiversity, and shows how overgrazing and population increase can desertify forest habitats and farmland. This is an outstanding resource for illustrating ecological variety and fragility.
Online
2006; 2005
11.

Desert Biomes [electronic resource]

Whether it's a stretch of sand dunes in equatorial Africa or a cactus-covered plain in California, any place that receives less than ten inches of rain per year is considered a desert. By comparing and contrasting arid and semi-arid regions, this program provides students with a balanced picture of the Earth's desert biomes. The program also investigates how the few plants and animals that inhabit these ecosystems survive the extreme temperatures and severe lack of water that characterize the desert environment.
Online
2005; 2002
12.

Ecology [electronic resource]: Life at the Edge of the Sea

This Science Screen Report explores the challenges that marine plants and animals face in rocky shoreline areas, and vividly illustrates the diversity of those life forms. Examining crustaceans, gastropods, mollusks, and other shoreline creatures, the program shows how tide pools form a marine sub-habitat, and how rocky shore dwellers have evolved specific abilities to survive powerful waves and gather food from the ebb and flow of tides. The medicinal value of certain tidal zone organisms is also discussed in detail.
Online
2006; 2001
13.

Expedition Above the Clouds [electronic resource]

From the tangled jungle of river basins, Humboldt and Bonpland journeyed into the thin air of Ecuador, Peru, and Mexico, reaching a literal height with their ascent of Mt. Chimborazo. This program weaves location footage, reenactments, rare manuscripts, and readings from Humboldt's letters and journals to present the second half of a scientific odyssey. Humboldt's paradigm of "botanical geography" is clearly seen as the precursor to today's concept of ecological systems.
Online
2006; 1999
14.

Fiji [electronic resource]

Situated in the South Pacific north of New Zealand, the Republic of Fiji was settled as far back as 3500 BC. With the help of foreign settlers, Ratu Seru Epenisa Cakobau united part of Fiji's warring tribes under his leadership and established a united Fijian kingdom in 1871. The British subjugated the island in 1874 and brought over Indian contract laborers. This film examines how, after gaining independence from British rule in 1971, Fiji has struggled to maintain political stability in spite of differences between the Fijian and Indo-Fijian people. With a culture that is a rich mosaic of Indigenous Fijian, Indo-Fijian, Asian, and European traditions, a unique way of life has developed on this beautiful island nation?
Online
2011
15.

The Galapagos [electronic resource]

Forged from volcanic eruptions deep below the seabed, the Galapagos Islands are home to some of most rare species in the world. This film explores this remarkable archipelago off the coast of Ecuador, where Charles Darwin studied the endemic species and formed his theory of evolution?
Online
2011
16.

Gobi [electronic resource]

Known as one of the most extreme places on the planet, the Gobi Desert can see a temperature change of more than 80 degrees in a 24-hour period, and dust storms with winds over 100 miles per hour. Occasional frost and snow on the dunes is not an uncommon sight. Despite the harsh conditions, the surrounding regions sustain a multitude of animal and plant life. This film explores Asia's largest desert with its expanses of gravel plains and rocky outcrops.
Online
2011
17.

Grassland Biomes [electronic resource]

The prairies of the American west, the pampas of Argentina, the steppes of Russia, and the veldt of South Africa all share at least one thing in common: they are covered with miles upon miles of grass. This program can help students learn to identify the climates, life-forms, and behavioral adaptations that correspond to each type of grassland biome. Factors that threaten the survival of these habitats' distinctive animal communities-and of the ecosystems themselves-are also addressed.
Online
2005; 2002
18.

Iceland [electronic resource]

In the middle of the North Atlantic, at the edge of the Arctic Circle, lies the island nation of Iceland. This film explores one of the most volatile places on Earth. Made by volcano-spewed molten rock over millions of years, Iceland was settled by Norsemen more than 1,500 years ago. This island's isolation, continued volcanic activity, and soil conditions make living here a unique challenge.
Online
2011
19.

Italy [electronic resource]: Natural Hazards and Disasters

Why do communities take hold in areas prone to flooding, volcanic eruptions, and other catastrophes? This program profiles Italian cities that have suffered from natural disasters and why habitation has continued in those places. Touring flood-plagued Florence, its Arno River dam, and a Roman-style house near Pompeii, the program presents examples of how, throughout history, environmental dangers have taken a backseat to everyday human needs, until they can no longer be ignored.
Online
2005; 2002
20.

Judea [electronic resource]

Lying east of Jerusalem and descending to the Dead Sea, the Judean Desert is relatively small at just over 900 square miles. It's full of breathtaking views, and has an incredible history that in turn has shaped the cultural history of mankind, and given birth to the religions of Judaism and Christianity. Major urban areas such as Bethlehem and Jericho are included in this area, making it one of the more populated deserts?
Online
2011