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1.

Il Etait Une Foret

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"For years, Luc Jacquet has spellbound audiences worldwide with his intimate yet spectacular stories of the natural world. His encounter with pioneering botanist and ecologist Francis Hallé was to give birth to this extraordinary exploration of the prehistoric rainforests, the great green lungs of our planet. Once Upon a Forest offers this unique voyage into a completely untamed universe, a world of perfect balance in which each living thing - from the smallest to the largest - plays an essential role. The film will deliver a complete sensory immersion in the primeval splendour of one of nature's richest mysteries, inviting the audience to enter, discover and marvel at a universe of untold treasures while joining its voice to the ever growing awareness of the need to preserve our wor [...]
DVD
2014
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Il Était Une Forêt

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Through his new film, Luc Jacquet takes us on an extraordinary journey into the depths of the rainforest in the heart of life itself. His meeting with the botanist Francis Hallé gave birth to this film heritage on the big ultimate tropical forests, sanctuaries of global biodiversity. The first push to the development of the giant trees of the mature forest, through the development of plants and animals between hidden links, no fewer than seven centuries elapse before our eyes.
DVDBlu-Ray
2014; 2013
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

Global Generation

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This six part series focuses on current trends in globalization and the implications for both industrialized and developing countries. Drawing on live interviews and case studies from around the world, the programs explore concepts such as human rights violation, exploitation of the environment, biodiversity, third-world debt, ethical investment policies and free-market economies. The efforts of various humanitarian groups, non-governmental and grassroots organizations in staving off the widespread efforts of globalization are also explored.
VHS
2002
Ivy (By Request)
4.

Nature's Numbers

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Follows scientists in Bolivian rainforest attempting to quantify eradication as example of the controversial practice of extrapolating from data gathered in small areas to predict global extinction rates. Highlighted area discussed is Park Noel Kempff Mercado, Santa Cruz, Bolivia.
VHS
1998; 1996
Ivy (By Request)
5.

Forever Wild? [electronic resource]

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In "Prairie Comeback," Alan Alda visits the Nature Conservancy's Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in northeast Oklahoma, where scientists, using chiefly the interplay of bison and fire, are seeking to restore the full prairie ecosystem on a 50-square-mile former cattle ranch. In "The Second Earth, " Biosphere scientists examine the effect of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on natural ecosystems. In "Raven's World, " Peter Raven and Alan Alda discuss the pressing need to conserve Earth's biodiversity--a term Raven himself helped coin in the 1980's.
Online
2005; 2002
6.

Biodiversity [electronic resource]

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Explains that with current extinction rates exceeding those of previous mass extinctions, many biodiversity studies focus on efforts to count the Earth's species before they are lost. Explores current field experiments studying complex ecosystems and how environmental and biodiversity changes might affect their functions.
Online
2003
7.

The Secret World [electronic resource]

The Tara Oceans research team came together to better understand the marine world, arguably the most important ecosystem on Earth. This program lays the groundwork for their three-year expedition, introducing the personnel, their on-board lab, and their mission-to learn more about plankton, and to gain insight into the health of the planet as a result. Viewers travel with the crew as they sail the western Mediterranean searching for plankton colonies and observing microscopic interactions between phytoplankton and zooplankton. The team also maps out a plan to draw up a complete planktonic inventory.
Online
2010
8.

Man and the Oceans [electronic resource]

With no obvious predators to curb the population, humans are experiencing a growth in numbers that stands outside the laws of nature. What role does man play in the decreasing biodiversity of the earth, and of marine life in particular? In this program, the Tara Oceans researchers go to the Indian Ocean to investigate human influence on the health of the seas. Around the Austral Islands, the team finds copepods are being attacked by viruses, leading to speculation about the role of viruses in a balanced ecology. Sailing on, they encounter former fishing zones overrun by jellyfish and areas of damaged coral-troubling signs of rising oceanic temperatures.
Online
2010
9.

Air [electronic resource]: World's Weirdest

This video takes us to the sky to catch up with bizarre birds and other airborne creatures you wouldn't want to bump into at night, or any other time. The sky isn't just for the birds - it's home to lovers and fighters, parasites and predators. These are the world's weirdest flyers: the freaks of the sky. To leave the earthbound world behind takes lift, direction, strength, and nerves of steel. Whether jumping, gliding, hovering, or flying, these animals make defying gravity looks easy. Meet the flying squirrel and other remarkable creatures. This episode reveals the world's weirdest air bourne creatures as we learn that the sky is not just for the birds.
Online
2010
10.

Freaks on Land [electronic resource]: World's Weirdest

In the animal kingdom, there's no shortage of creepy, bizarre creatures who crawl on this planet. They range from horned lizards, who shoot blood from their eyes in self-defense to creatures that raise their offspring in the carcasses of dead animals. Some creatures are so bizarre they defy imagination. Komodo dragons use a sixth sense, a 'smell-o-vision' from the roof of their mouth, to seek out prey and cannibal black widow spiders sense movement with their feet. The female preying mantis bites off her mate's head during sex. Hedgehogs will munch on cigarettes and bathe in oil in order to be crossed off the menu for predators.
Online
2010
11.

Water [electronic resource]: World's Weirdest

Dive deep into the realm of creepy aquatic creatures to uncover the world's most bizarre water-dwelling tenants. Among them, a fish with a transparent head shows off everything it's got. Hermaphrodite flatworms battle to determine which among them will be male or female. A master-of-disguise octopus camouflages itself as a rock, a plant and even as a snake, to capture prey or elude pursuit. A lizard literally walks on water, while a fish "walks" on dry land to find a mate, and that's just for starters. Join us as we take a deep dive into the realm of creepy aquatic creatures and surfaces with its most bizarre denizens.
Online
2010
12.

The Human Family Tree [electronic resource]

Astoria, Queens, New York is the melting pot of melting pots, with a range of skin tones, heights, weights, hair types, and eye shapes, to say nothing of their beliefs, cultures, languages, and trades. But just how different are we? At a street fair in the heart of Astoria, on a sweltering July day, geneticist Spencer Wells and his team take DNA samples from this amazingly diverse group. These samples will show how a selection of New Yorkers: a waitress, a teacher, a councilman, a fashion model, and a mother, among many others, with ethnic origins as diverse as Thai, Puerto Rican and African - are all connected; that they, like everyone else on the planet, can trace their ancestry back to the same small group of Homo sapiens who began eking out a living in Africa less than 200,000 ye [...]
Online
2009
13.

Among the Wild Chimpanzees [electronic resource]

Jane Goodall is legendary among primate researchers, and for good reason: she learned more on her own studying chimpanzees than all who went before her combined. In 1960, Goodall set out for Tanzania's remote Gombe Stream Game Reserve to study the behavior of man's closest living relative, the chimpanzee, showing her quiet determination to observe these animals closely while disturbing them as little as possible. Gaining their trust over a 20-year period of noninterference, she gathered an unprecedented wealth of information on their rich social lives. We see playing, fighting, grooming, and even the once-controversial tool-use among the remarkably human-seeming chimpanzees. Goodall's grace and scientific curiosity really shine; she is a model for field biologists the world over. Thi [...]
Online
1984
14.

Who's Aping Who? [electronic resource]: Bringing Up Baby

They're hairy, they flaunt their bottoms shamelessly, and their manners are appalling. But look into the eyes of a gorilla, an orangutan, or a chimpanzee and you can't help feeling the connection. We're all related - all members of the great ape family. This fascinating program examines the development of ape and human identities from birth to first speech. Witness amazing footage of apes learning to communicate using sign language then travel to the Kansas City Zoo as we visit Jill, the first orangutan ever to have her pregnancy monitored. What scientists learn from her pregnancy could help us understand more about our distant relatives and their existence in the wild. In this program, explore ape and human development, from birth to communication, along with remarkable segments co [...]
Online
2000
15.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Frans de Waal - Moral Behavior in Animals

Empathy, cooperation, fairness, and reciprocity - caring about the well-being of others seems like a very human trait. But in this TEDTalk, primatologist Frans de Waal shares some surprising videos of behavioral tests on primates and other mammals that show how many of these moral traits all of us share.
Online
2012
16.

How to Build an Ancient Man [electronic resource]

All that remains of "Inuk" are a few tufts of tangled human hair dug out of Greenland's permafrost, yet as scientists rebuild the identity of this 4,000-year-old arctic hunter, they rewrite the history of Greenland and the New World's settlement. From these threads of evidence, scientists attempt the impossible: to be the first to reconstruct the identity of a Stone Age human being. In this program, Professor Eske Willerslev and his colleagues analyze DNA using Illumina technology. After washing the sample in bleach, adding enzymes, and baking it, a concentrated sample of almost perfectly preserved genetic material emerges. The team identifies genetic markers that point toward an Asian origin, a finding they claim overturns mainstream theory about how humans populated the Earth. Acco [...]
Online
2010
17.

Dino Revolution [electronic resource]

Fuzzy babies. Stay-at-home dads. Flamboyant feathers. Exactly what you think when you hear the words Tyrannosaurus rex, right? If not, then think again. For hundreds of years, we thought dinosaurs ruled the planet as scaly, reptilian beasts that terrorized early earth. But new scientific advances are proving us wrong and painting an entirely new picture of not only the T. rex, but the entire dinosaur world. With the discovery of feathered dinosaurs in China and a revolutionary new method of reconstructing original color, scientists are building a new picture of what dinosaurs actually looked like, how they behaved, and how they used their feathers. Watch to learn how the myth of the huge lizards that terrorized the landscape is proven wrong by new science and meet the one tiny, birdl [...]
Online
2000
18.

TEDTalks [electronic resource]: Tyrone Hayes + Penelope Jagessar Chaffer - the Toxic Baby?

Filmmaker Penelope Jagessar Chaffer was curious about the chemicals she was exposed to while pregnant; could they affect her unborn child? So she asked biologist Tyrone Hayes to brief her on one he studied closely: atrazine, an herbicide used on corn. (Hayes, an expert on amphibians, is a critic of atrazine, which displays a disturbing effect on frog development.) Onstage together at TEDWomen, Hayes and Chaffer tell their story.
Online
2012
19.

The Mountain Barrier [electronic resource]

Rising to heights of 13,000 feet, the Sarawat Mountains of Western Arabia extend for 1,000 miles along the entire length of the Red Sea, and are home to numerous species of wildlife. High juniper forests, fed by moisture rising from the Red Sea, support large troops of Hamadryas baboons, and exotic African birds such as the hornbill, Abyssinian roller, and thirteen other bird species found nowhere else in the world. The abandoned mountain village of al-Fawqa has become home to fruit bats, sunbirds, and weaver birds. In the vast volcanic moonscape that exists behind the mountain wall, spring growth provides a nursery for millions of migrating birds.
Online
1990
20.

Atacama [electronic resource]

The Atacama Desert in Chile is commonly known as the driest place on Earth. Studies by a group of British scientists have suggested that some riverbeds have been dry for 120,000 years. Once known for its rich deposits of copper and the world's largest natural supply of sodium nitrate, the desert is now home to the largest space observatory every built by man. Because of its high altitude, nearly non-existent cloud cover, dry air, and lack of light pollution and radio interference from the very widely spaced cities, the desert is one of the best places in the world to conduct astronomical observations.
Online
2011