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1.

10 Ways to Destroy the Earth [electronic resource]

In this program, scientific experts dream up ways to destroy Planet Earth, including swallowing it with a black hole, blowing it up with antimatter, hurling it into the Sun, and switching off gravity.
Online
2009
2.

The Age of Hubble [electronic resource]

2015 marks the 25th anniversary year of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope, an event that has propelled us into the Golden Age of Astronomy and brought us closer than ever to answering the most perplexing questions-what are the origins of the universe? And are there other worlds like our own, rich with life? The Age of Hubble is gripping, high-end space programming at its best and essential viewing for space enthusiasts of all ages.
Online
2015
3.

Alien Faces [electronic resource]

In this program, scientists, astrobiologists, and astronomers combine scientific fact and a little imagination to create five lines of extraterrestrial evolution and explain how creatures on the surface of Earth can offer a helping hand to understanding life on other planets.
Online
2008
4.

Alien Moons [electronic resource]

From the inner solar system to the Kuiper Belt, this program explore the moons of the Solar System's surrounding planets.
Online
2008
5.

The Ancient Maya [electronic resource]: Tools of Astronomy

In this episode of Where Did It Come From? host Michael Guillen travels to the Yucatán peninsula to study the ancient world's most skilled astronomers: the Maya. A visit is made to the Pyramid of Kukulcán - a giant solar observatory - and to the round structure known as El Caracol, which looks amazingly like a modern-day observatory. In addition, Guillen demonstrates how the Maya might have used the sun to lay out their various temples and observatories and examines the incredibly complex and accurate Mayan calendar.
Online
2006
6.

An Answer to Everything [electronic resource]

Is our universe a minor event in an endless series of universes (or multiverses)? Today, scientists generally agree on the big bang origin of the universe fifteen billion years ago. But as we track the expansion backward, toward that moment of seeming creation, the details begin to blur. In this program, Stephen Hawking explores the difficulties in presenting a scientific explanation connecting the beginning of the universe with the conditions existing today, absent of gaps in the cause-and-effect chain - the crucial requirement of science. However, the program also presents the tentative and remarkable new theories uniting relativity and quantum mechanics, such as the inflation theory and superstring theory, revealing how they may actually hold the promise of a simple explanation f [...]
Online
1997
7.

Astronomy [electronic resource]

This video clip takes viewers to the Hubble Space Telescope and offers an overview of the groundbreaking discoveries that have been made and breath-taking images that have been taken using this instrument.
Online
2010
8.

The Big Bang [electronic resource]

Many scientists of the early 20th century, including Albert Einstein, found the idea of an expanding universe with an abrupt origin unpalatable - viewing the universe as static and eternal. This program explores the history of our controversial and explosive beginnings. It seems all scientists agreed that the controversy could only be settled by direct and precise measurements. But the question remained: what measurements? For almost 40 years a debate raged until Robert Dicke proposed that the big bang would have produced a flash of light still present everywhere as a glow of radio waves. Then, in 1965 Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson unmistakably found that glow, now called the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) ending the debate and establishing that our universe had a fier [...]
Online
1997
9.

Biggest Blasts [electronic resource]

This program catalogues the most powerful blasts in the universe, working its way up from massive meteor strikes, to supernova explosions and gamma ray bursts, to the detonation that started it all: the Big Bang.
Online
2009
10.

Biggest Things in Space [electronic resource]

From the Lymann Alpha blob, to radio lobes and super-galaxy clusters, to the largest black hole in space, this program introduces viewers to the most enormous objects in the cosmos.
Online
2008
11.

Black Holes and Beyond [electronic resource]

The universe is a strange and violent place: full of regions spewing out energy on an unimaginable scale and objects so massive not even light can escape from them. With the discovery of quasars (extremely luminous, compact objects in the hearts of ancient galaxies), the picture of the universe has become even more complex. This program examines possible mechanisms responsible for such enormous outputs of energy, focusing on one particular concept found in a part of Einstein's theory of relativity - massive black holes at the centers of distant galaxies. This program offers remarkable insight into the implication of black holes in Einstein's theory of relativity and the physicist that set out to prove the presence of collapsed stars, Robert Oppenheimer.
Online
1997
12.

Breaking the Wall of the Beginning of Time [electronic resource]: How Cosmology Will Tell Us What Happened Before the Big Bang

What happened at the beginning of the universe? Was the big bang the real origin? Is our universe unique? Are its basic features determined by mathematical laws or historical accidents? What does its future look like? Is it a one-off event or does it evolve through cycles? In this video from the 2011 Falling Walls Conference, hear Jean-Luc Lehners lecture on the relatively new field of string cosmology, which tackles these kinds of seminal questions about our universe. His research team at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics is studying and developing cosmological theories, such as inflationary cosmology and the theory of the cyclic universe, within the context of string theory. If successful, this new frame of research will provide a unified description of nature and [...]
Online
2011
13.

Breaking the Wall of the Hidden Universe [electronic resource]: How Particle Physics Can Explain the Nature of Matter

Particle physics doesn't just expand our horizons; it helps explain the universe by examining the nature of matter, both seen and unseen. In this video lecture from the 2009 Falling Walls Conference, hear from Rolf-Dieter Heuer, who works with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. He discusses their quest to provide experimental evidence either confirming or refuting the existence of the Higgs boson, an elementary particle predicted to exist by the Standard Model of particle physics, and to break the wall of the hidden universe, the 96 percent of it that takes the form of dark matter and energy. In Heuer's career as a physicist, he has worked on the construction and operation of several large particle detector systems, among them JADE at the German Electron Synchrotron in Hamburg, Germany.
Online
2009
14.

Careers in the Physical Sciences [electronic resource]

There's nothing boring about stopping a speeding bullet, especially when it's accomplished with liquid. How about designing robots based on insect anatomy.or using computers to figure out what George Washington really looked like? This video shows students the thrills and rewards of working in the physical sciences, demonstrating that becoming a chemist, physicist, or engineer involves fun, personal challenges, and the chance to develop groundbreaking technologies. The program profiles a mechanical engineer, a chemical engineer, a materials scientist, a mathematician, and a forensic scientist specializing in digital reconstruction. Recommended for grades 6-12.
Online
2007
15.

Colonizing Space [electronic resource]

In this program, scientific experts discuss the ultimate space mission - the establishment of a colony on Mars - including how they plan to grow food in space, recycle wastewater, and introduce greenhouse gases to revive the red planet and make it more habitable for humans.
Online
2008
16.

Cosmic Alchemy [electronic resource]

What is the universe and everything in it made of? In this program, viewers explore the discoveries in the late 19th century that revealed that the entire observable universe is made of the same elements as those on Earth. With knowledge of the dual nature of matter and energy, scientists began to fit the pieces of the macroscopic and microscopic world together. A rare and unique look at the discovery of the nature of matter, its initial creation from the primordial conditions in the big bang, the building up of elements in stars, and how these discoveries might affect the end of the universe.
Online
1997
17.

Cosmic Apocalypse [electronic resource]

The universe as we know it will eventually die. This program theorizes on the end of space, matter, and even time as it outlines the harsh and hostile possibilities of the far distant future.
Online
2008
18.

Cosmic Collisions [electronic resource]

Star crashes. Mass extinction-causing impacts. In this program, astronomers attempt to better understand how such collisions occur and how the universe was created.
Online
2008
19.

Cosmic Phenomena [electronic resource]

The Aurora Borealis and rainbows. UV radiation and cosmic rays. This program examine a variety of cosmic events that have both helped and harmed life on Earth.
Online
2009
20.

Dark Matter [electronic resource]

What, exactly, is dark matter? In this program, scientists theorize as they struggle to understand dark matter's unique properties.
Online
2008