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2.

Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey

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This documentary series explores the history of science and how we found our place in the cosmos.
DVD
2014
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

400 Years of the Telescope: A Journey of Science, Technology and Thought

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"The film features interviews with leading astrophysicists and cosmologists from the world's renowned universities and observatories, who explain concepts ranging from Galileo's act of revealing the cosmos with a simple telescope, to the latest discoveries in space, including startling new ideas about life on other planets and dark energy - a mysterious vacuum energy that is accelerating the expansion of the universe." - Container.
DVD
2009; 2008
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

Cosmology: The History and Nature of Our Universe

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In his 36 lectures, professor Mark Whittle talks on knowledge of astronomy and our universe.
DVD
2008
Clemons (Stacks)
5.

Cosmos: A Personal Journey

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DVD
2000; 1980
Clemons (Stacks)
6.

The Universe: A Guided Tour

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Disc 1 composed of 13 ten-minute programs, this disc studies the Sun, each planet, the Moon, comets, phenomena such as eclipses and the aurora borealis, the search for extraterrestrial life, and the threat of a comet or asteroid impacting with Earth. Disc 2 composed of 12 ten-minute programs considers the past, present, and future of astronomy and space exploration, technological innovation such as the Hubble Space Telescope, robot probes, and satellites, life aboard space shuttles and the Mir space station, black holes and dark matter, the structure of the universe and the Big Bang.
DVD
2000
Clemons (Stacks)
7.

Celestial Mechanics: The Distance to the Moon

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VHS
1988
Ivy (By Request)
8.

Observatories: Stonehenge to the Hubble Telescope

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VHS
1997
Ivy (By Request)
9.

Astronomy[videorecording]

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This disc is a visual data base of observations of the Milky Way and other galaxies using still images and movie and video clips. Includes catalogs of galaxies, sky surveys, spectragraphic studies, information about observatories, research centers, planetaria and science centers. Includes material on skywatching, the solar system, each of the major planets, the outer planets and the minor planets.
Laserdisc
1986
Ivy (By Request)
10.

The Restless Planet [electronic resource]

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Reveals that early Greek astronomers believed that Earth was the center of the universe but this notion changed dramatically over time, especially after the invention of the telescope. Traces the development of astronomical theory with discussions of the discoveries of Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, and Newton. Unique characteristics of Earth are also discussed.
Online
1992
11.

The Ring of Truth: Program 6 Doubt

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"Doubt" begins around the time that World War I ended. The program follows astronomer Cecilia Payne's quest to find the recipe of the stars, utilizing tiny rainbow images to deduce their composition - 90% hydrogen. This has recently been thrown into doubt as astronomer Vera Rubin demonstrates.
VHS
1987
Ivy (By Request)
12.

The Ring of Truth: Program 3 Mapping

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In "Mapping", a Ryder rental van is turned into a mobile star-sighting observatory on a long voyage through Nebraska and Kansas as Morrison re-measures the earth.
VHS
1987
Ivy (By Request)
13.

Music of the Spheres

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Traces the evolution of mathematics and explores the relationship of numbers to musical harmony, early astronomy, and perspective in painting.
VHS
1973
Ivy (By Request)
14.

Scientific Method [electronic resource]

This program examines the basic elements of the scientific method: defining and researching the problem, forming a hypothesis, gathering information through experimentation and observation, analyzing the data, forming a conclusion, and communicating the results. Practical applications of the scientific method, such as testing new medicines and analyzing the performance of sporting goods, are included as well. Correlates to the National Science Education Standards developed by the National Academies of Science and Project 2061 Benchmarks for Science Literacy from the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Online
2005; 1999
15.

Magnetism [electronic resource]: Invisible Fields of Force

This Science Screen Report studies the physical force known as electromagnetism and how it encircles, interacts with, and is generated by matter. Demonstrating attractive and repulsive forces with iron filings suspended in liquid, the program explains the significance of a magnet's poles and why some materials are more magnetic than others. The electromagnetic fields of the Earth and Sun are also explored, with attention to magnetism's role in animal migration, the aurora borealis, and solar storms. Animated sequences reinforce essential concepts.
Online
2006; 2001
16.

How Science Works [electronic resource]: Chasing the Wind

Is global warming human-driven? Can its effects be accurately measured? What are its long-term consequences? According to Dr. Maggie Aderin-Pocock, a renowned British space scientist, the only way to answer those questions is through rigorous observation. In this program, Dr. Aderin-Pocock describes her work with the Aeolus satellite project. Named after the "keeper of the winds" in ancient Greek mythology, Aeolus represents the first-ever opportunity to directly observe Earth's wind patterns from space. The data it generates will not only lead to more sophisticated weather predictions-as Dr. Aderin-Pocock makes clear, it will also facilitate more informed debate about climate change.
Online
2007
17.

Seeing Is Believing [electronic resource]

From the dawn of civilization humans have struggled to understand the nature of the universe. The ancients sought answers from pure reason limited by beliefs in gods and an Earth-centered universe. In the Renaissance, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, and Newton sparked a revolution in thought. They added measurement and the concept of universal physical law to reason and supposition. This program chronicles the birth of science and the initiation of world-changing discoveries up to 1927, when Edwin Hubble, on a California mountaintop observatory, asked the right question and had the means to answer it. The interpretation of his results was astounding: the entire universe was expanding from an explosive moment of creation - the big bang.
Online
1997
18.

Cosmic Alchemy [electronic resource]

What is the universe and everything in it made of? In this program, viewers explore the discoveries in the late 19th century that revealed that the entire observable universe is made of the same elements as those on Earth. With knowledge of the dual nature of matter and energy, scientists began to fit the pieces of the macroscopic and microscopic world together. A rare and unique look at the discovery of the nature of matter, its initial creation from the primordial conditions in the big bang, the building up of elements in stars, and how these discoveries might affect the end of the universe.
Online
1997
19.

On the Dark Side [electronic resource]

Will the universe keep expanding forever or will it someday stop and start collapsing upon itself in a big crunch? This program ventures through the observational research of American astronomer Vera Rubin on the velocities of stars around galaxies and the massive amount of matter exerting a gravitational force that we simply cannot see. Yet, this "dark matter" makes up roughly 90 percent of the stuff in the universe, and it has important gravitational implications for the future of the universe - perhaps there is just enough matter for the expansion to be halted by gravity but not enough to collapse. For scientists there are two main obstacles to finding answer: what is the mysterious dark matter? How much of it is there?
Online
1997
20.

Black Holes and Beyond [electronic resource]

The universe is a strange and violent place: full of regions spewing out energy on an unimaginable scale and objects so massive not even light can escape from them. With the discovery of quasars (extremely luminous, compact objects in the hearts of ancient galaxies), the picture of the universe has become even more complex. This program examines possible mechanisms responsible for such enormous outputs of energy, focusing on one particular concept found in a part of Einstein's theory of relativity - massive black holes at the centers of distant galaxies. This program offers remarkable insight into the implication of black holes in Einstein's theory of relativity and the physicist that set out to prove the presence of collapsed stars, Robert Oppenheimer.
Online
1997