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1.

Asia: The Tectonics of Life and Death [electronic resource]

Over the many billions of years of the Earth's history our planet has never stopped changing shape. Massive tectonic forces have sculpted and re-sculpted our world in a never ending journey. Tectonics has created life - and destroyed it as well. This program discusses the tectonic history of Asia, mass extinctions, the Himalayas and the creation of a country from its sediment.
Online
2012
2.

Asia: Rising Mountains and Sinking Countries [electronic resource]

Over the many billions of years of the Earth's history our planet has never stopped changing shape. Massive tectonic forces have sculpted and re-sculpted our world in a never ending journey. Tectonics has created life - and destroyed it as well. This episode chronicles the Himalayas, investigates how Siberia joined other land masses, and discusses tectonic activity that impacts Japan and Indonesia.
Online
2012
3.

Match Made

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Marriage customs reveal much about the economic and social structure of a country. This documentary, filmed in Ho Chi Minh City, chronicles the search of an awkward 38-year-od Singaporean for a young, beautiful Vietnamese bride, with the help of a marriage broker. Ricky, the bachelor, sits in a modest hotel room, self consciously assessing the shy young women who present themselves as candidates for marriage. Communication is accomplished with the help of a translator since Ricky, speaks only Chinese, and the girls speak Vietnamese. The young women still in the running are subjected to medical examinations, to insure they are disease free and virgins. The marriage brokers are well versed in arranging introductions, quick picture perfect weddings, travel documents ... and payments to [...]
Online
2006
4.

Endgame Europe [electronic resource]

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Low-skilled as well as high-technology jobs have recently migrated from Europe to Asia, where labor cost is much lower, causing mass unemployment in some Western countries. For instance, a large Swiss Bank and some European airline companies have their data processing system developed and operated by Indian engineers based in India. Is Europe losing out to Asian competition? What will the consequences be on the Welfare state?
Online
1996
5.

Footnotes Ballet in Asia [electronic resource]: The Classics of Ballet

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This episode of Footnotes: The Classics of Ballet is about the development of ballet in Asia. Features selected performances by National Ballet of China and Hong Kong Ballet.
Online
1997
6.

Asian/Asian-American Perspectives on Modern Dance [electronic resource]

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Choreographers Kumiko Kimoto, Sun Ock Lee, Mel Wong and moderator Peggy Choy discuss how Asian and Asian-American issues and identity shape their work. Discussion is intercut with excerpts from work performed by each choreographer.
Online
1995
7.

Asian/Asian-American Perspectives on Modern Dance

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Choreographers Kumiko Kimoto, Sun Ock Lee, Mel Wong and moderator Peggy Choy discuss how Asian and Asian-American issues and identity shape their work. Discussion is intercut with excerpts from work performed by each choreographer.
Online
1995
8.

Wild Extremes

The most extreme and wild parts of New Zealand are in the South Island, which lies towards Antarctica, in the path of the tempestuous "roaring forties." This is home to some of the most rapidly rising mountains in the world, the Southern Alps. From hyper-intelligent parrots to sinister snails with teeth and magical constellations of glow-worms, this is the story of New Zealand's wildest places and its most resilient pioneers, all of whom must embrace radical solutions to survive.
Online
2017; 2016
9.

China, One Million Artists

China has been the biggest art seller in the entire world since 2012. Yet they remain relatively unknown compared to these numbers. Who are these artists? What drives them and how do they circumvent censorship? Contemporary Chinese art took off spectacularly after Mao’s death. Artists have revisited Western art and some have hijacked communist propaganda, supplementing it with a vitriolic critic of western consumerism currently sweeping the country. Art is well placed to observe the excesses of Chinese society and it has become the flag bearer for aspirations to freedom. These contemporary works symbolize people’s wounds and hardships, as well as state violence. Although two artists—Basquiat and Koons—account for 50% of the American market, China has placed 47 artists in the top 100— [...]
Online
2017
10.

Background to China's Communist Revolution

This program traces the rise of nationalism in China under the Kuomintang leadership of Sun Yat-Sen and Chiang Kai-Shek, and the emergence of the Communist Chinese Party under Mao Zedong. The causes of China's political stability are explored from the declining years of the Qing dynasty through to the Wuchang Uprising, the White Terror and the infamous Long March.
Online
2017; 2015
11.

Mudras: Hand Gestures of Sanskrit Drama

Three Indian actor-dancers demonstrate the stylized gestures of classical Sanskrit drama using examples from the play Vision of Vasavadatta.
Online
2017; 1980
12.

The Great Wall, China

In about 220 B.C., under Qin Shin Huang, sections of fortifications which had been built earlier were joined together to form a united defense system against invasions from the north. Construction continued up to the Ming dynasty (1368-1644), when the Great Wall became the world's largest military structure. Its historic and strategic importance is matched only by its architectural value.
Online
2017; 1996
13.

The Forbidden City, China

Seat of supreme power for over five centuries, the Forbidden City, with its landscaped gardens and many buildings whose thousands of rooms contain furniture and works of art, constitutes a priceless testimony to Chinese civilization during the Ming and Qing dynasties.
Online
2017; 1997
14.

Yasawi Mausoleum, Kazakhstan

The Mausoleum of Khoja Ahmed Yasawi, in the town of Yasi (now Turkestan), was built at the time of Timur (Tamerlane), from 1389 to 1405. In this partly unfinished building, Persian master builders experimented with architectural and structural solutions later used in the construction of Samarkand, the capital of the Timurid Empire. Today, it is one of the largest and best-preserved constructions of the Timurid period.
Online
2017; 2004
15.

The Icemen: Angadias of India

The angadias—literally “ones who carries valuables”—perform a task that major carriers in the region such as FedEx decline because of the risks involved. Ironically, even without handheld scanners and high-tech tracking systems, this simple delivery system is the fastest, cheapest, and most reliable method of transporting diamonds in this region of the world. Very efficient and very loyal, they are the pioneers of the courier services. This modern-day version of "next day delivery" started almost a century ago in India. Almost every industry in India has at times used angadia service. Even in this day and age of internet and email, angadias play a very important role in business functionality. Plainly dressed, unarmed, and carrying unmarked canvas sacks, these men transport $4 millio [...]
Online
2018; 2009
16.

Damascus, Syria: Paradise in the Desert

Founded in the 3rd millennium B.C., Damascus is one of the oldest cities in the Middle East. In the Middle Ages, it was the center of a flourishing craft industry, specializing in swords and lace. The city has some 125 monuments from different periods of its history, and one of the most spectacular is the 8th-century Great Mosque of the Umayyads, built on the site of an Assyrian sanctuary.
Online
2017; 2001
17.

This Is What We Do (July 1967-December 1967)

American casualties mount as they face deadly North Vietnamese ambushes and artillery. Hanoi lays plans for a massive surprise offensive, and the Johnson administration reassures the American public that victory is in sight.
Online
2018; 2017
18.

The Koguryo Graves, North Korea: Combat-Ready for All Eternity

The site includes several groups and individual tombs—totalling about 30 individual graves—from the later period of the Koguryo Kingdom, one of the strongest kingdoms in northeast China and half of the Korean peninsula between the 3rd century B.C. and 7th century A.D. The tombs, many with beautiful wall paintings, are almost the only remains of this culture. Only about 90 out of more than 10,000 Koguryo tombs discovered in China and Korea so far have wall paintings. Many of these tombs are located on this site, and they are thought to have been made for the burial of kings, members of the royal family and the aristocracy. These paintings offer a unique testimony to daily life of this period.
Online
2017; 2006
19.

Haein-Sa, South Korea: The Temple of the Black Art

The Temple of Haein-sa, on Mount Gaya, is home to the Tripitaka Koreana, the most complete collection of Buddhist texts, engraved on 80,000 woodblocks between 1237 and 1248. The buildings of Janggyeong Panjeon, which date from the 15th century, were constructed to house the woodblocks, which are also revered as exceptional works of art. As the oldest depository of the Tripitaka, they reveal an astonishing mastery of the invention and implementation of the conservation techniques used to preserve these woodblocks.
Online
2017; 1997
20.

The Special U.S.-Saudi Relationship Has Outlived Its Usefulness: A Debate

Since 1945, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt and King Abdul Aziz met onboard the USS Quincy, the United States and Saudi Arabia have maintained a special relationship, with oil, military cooperation, and intelligence sharing at its foundation. But the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the revolution in fracking in America, concerns over human rights, and diverging interests in the Middle East have all put strains on this relationship. After 70 years, has the special U.S.-Saudi relationship outlived its usefulness?
Online
2017