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Artificial Foods Industry
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1.

No Accounting for Taste [electronic resource]: Why We Eat What We Eat

With help from a professional nutritionist and the wide-ranging opinions of everyday consumers, this program investigates the factors that determine which foods we love-and which foods we just can't stomach. Viewers learn about a variety of social, psychological, and biological influences. Specific topics include the concept of satiety-our bodies telling us whether we are hungry or full-as well as the impact of culture, religion, lifestyle, peer relationships, and the media. For aspiring culinary artists, restaurant managers, and institutional menu planners, this is a rewarding exploration of the positive and negative associations people develop with food over time.
Online
2011
2.

Menu Planning [electronic resource]: Toddlers, Pregnancy, and the Elderly

Whether the setting is a preschool, hospital, or retirement home, it's vital for those who plan meals and menus to understand the dietary requirements of particular age groups. This program explains the nutrients our bodies require for optimum health and how those requirements change throughout our lives. Overviewing the stages of the human life cycle, the video highlights the basic nutritional needs in each phase and encourages thoughtful, detailed meal planning for toddlers, expectant mothers, and seniors. Real-life examples and practical tips from experts are provided throughout the film.
Online
2011
3.

Industrial Ingredients [electronic resource]: Food Science in Action

Almost any frozen pizza or carton of ice cream from the grocery store contains factory-produced, lab-developed ingredients. Do these materials have a functional purpose, an aesthetic one, or both? What kind of technology is needed to create and incorporate them? This video addresses those questions as it illustrates the uses and benefits of industrial food components. With examples from real-world production facilities, the video demonstrates large-scale food processing steps like emulsification, anti-caking, and foaming; explores reasons for putting industrial ingredients into food products, such as consumer safety and quality consistency; and looks at sustainable food production, nutraceuticals, and other crucial topics.
Online
2009
4.

All About Wheat [electronic resource]: Food Factory

Why does dried pasta keep so long? Why do supermarket sandwiches stay soft in the fridge? In this episode of Food Factory, Stefan Gates challenges John Torode and Lisa Faulkner to make "wheaty breakfast bricks.
Online
2012
5.

Food Preservation Techniques [electronic resource]

While preservatives may have a bad nutritional rap, the truth is that these substances allow seasonal food to be consumed throughout the year, and in areas where it would otherwise be unavailable. Methods of food preservation such as salting, drying, and smoking have been practiced for millennia, while others have been made possible on a commercial scale by technological advances such as freezing and pasteurizing. This program takes a look at the how and why of food preservation, covering a variety of techniques and explaining the differences between natural and artificial preservatives.
Online
2012
6.

Packed Lunch [electronic resource]

To find out the difference between freshly squeezed and "from concentrate," in this program Jimmy Doherty adapts a lawn mower and a mangle to make his own apple juice. He also investigates what they do to extra-light mayonnaise to cut the calories and how crackers stay crisp, and visits a greenhouse to learn why supermarket cucumbers are never crooked.
Online
2011
7.

Snack Food [electronic resource]

How do potato chips stay crunchy, and what makes ice cream the only food you can eat straight from the freezer? Jimmy Doherty turns his attention to snack foods in this program, visiting one of the biggest ice cream factories and one of the biggest potato chip factories in the world. He also tries to make his own carbonated cola drink.
Online
2010
8.

The Quick Fix [electronic resource]: Convenient Foods

Whether it's because we're time-poor or just disinterested in cooking, statistics show that the demand for convenience foods continues to grow. This program examines the evolution of the convenience food industry, from basic cake mixes to complete heat-and-eat meals. It looks at the impact microwave technology has on the types of food products being made and examines the correct way to use microwave ovens to reheat and cook food. The difference between "meal solutions" and "home meal replacements," or HMRs, is explained. We observe a boutique company catering for customers who want additive-free HMRs freshly made each day. The program explores the reasons behind the popularity of convenience foods and encourages students to question the nutritional and economic value of some of these [...]
Online
2002
9.

Food Therapy [electronic resource]: Functional Foods

With the connection between diet and health well established, food manufacturers have been quick to design products that appeal to the health-conscious consumer. In this program, we explore the boom in so-called "functional foods," such as vitamin-B-enriched breakfast cereals, calcium-enriched milk, and vitamin-enriched fruit juices. We examine functional foods of the past and present, and some potential future products. Comparisons are made between the benefits of eating functional food products and eating a variety of less processed, and often less expensive, foods. The value of nutritional information on food labels is explained, in particular the recommended daily intakes, or RDIs - and we learn about the legal constraints on the way functional foods can be promoted and labeled.
Online
2002
10.

From the Fridge [electronic resource]

Refrigeration keeps eggs and dairy products safe for us to eat, but what other steps are taken to prevent them from spoiling? In this program, Jimmy Doherty visits a cheese factory, makes his own version of reduced-fat spread, follows the journey of eggs from hen to supermarket, and attempts to pasteurize and homogenize milk.
Online
2010
11.

Hot and Cold [electronic resource]

Jimmy Doherty looks at how food factories use extreme temperatures in this program. By turning down the temperature, he makes soft-serve ice cream, then uses a high-pressure crusher to create prawn crackers. Jimmy also discovers what goes into the little extras that take-out places give away for free, and meets a broccoli farmer to see why he's in such a hurry to cool off.
Online
2011
12.

Love or Loathe [electronic resource]

Jimmy Doherty creates foods that provoke extreme reactions in this program. On one end of the scale is yeast extract - the main ingredient in Vegemite - and on the other, chocolate candy. After a trip to a confectioners to learn how they make chocolate appear so glossy, Jimmy visits a farmer who is harvesting a no-cry onion, and tries to make his own chewing gum.
Online
2011
13.

Party Party [electronic resource]

When it comes to making fish sticks for a children's party, a power saw is Jimmy's tool of choice. In this program he finds out what makes frozen fish products taste good and what really goes into marshmallows, then visits a factory that produces fifteen thousand bread rolls an hour, and meets a raspberry grower who wants to reduce his use of pesticides.
Online
2011
14.

Preserving [electronic resource]

Today, people expect even seasonal fare to be available 365 days a year. So how do food companies keep their products safe to eat weeks, months, or even years after it is produced? In this program, Jimmy Doherty looks at methods of food storage and preservation, visiting a manufacturing plant of frozen meals and a canned baked beans factory.
Online
2010
15.

Roast Dinner [electronic resource]

In this program, Jimmy Doherty makes Sunday dinner from scratch, attempting to create the flakes that make instant mashed potatoes and using a fish tank to decaffeinate coffee. He also visits a sheep farm to learn about breeding techniques, and heads off to a factory that makes 30 million perfect Yorkshire puddings every week.
Online
2011
16.

Just Add Water [electronic resource]

Does instant soup contain real tomatoes? How much sea water do you need to make sea-salt? In this episode of Food Factory, Stefan Gates challenges Anton Du Beke and Jodie Prenger to make orange drink.
Online
2012
17.

Frozen [electronic resource]

Why are coffee granules frozen at the factory, and why must peas be frozen fast? In this episode of Food Factory, Stefan Gates challenges Carol Kirkwood and Chris Hollins to make rival multicolored ice pops.
Online
2012
18.

Ready-Made [electronic resource]

Why do some pizzas contain fake cheese? How horrible is dog food? In this episode of Food Factory, Stefan Gates challenges One Show regulars Lucy Seigle and Mike Dilger to make ready-made custard.
Online
2012
19.

Supermarket Sleuth [electronic resource]

We're used to hearing bad news about our food. What's the good news? In this program, host Cherry Healey puts favorite supermarket staples to the test and uncovers the surprising secrets and unexpected powers of the food we take for granted. With the help of members of the public and a team of experts, she investigates how milk can help muscles recover from exercise; what effect the way we brew tea has on its health benefits; why there's more to potato chips than meets the eye; how many eggs we can safely eat; and whether we really can be addicted to chocolate. Using science to sort fact from fiction, she sheds new light on the food we all eat.
Online
2012
20.

The Cooking Process [electronic resource]: How Food Changes

It sounds simple, but scrambling an egg involves more than just heat, a frying pan, and a spatula. Using colorful, nontechnical demonstrations that any aspiring chef can understand and appreciate, this program illustrates important concepts regarding the cooking process and its effect on the basic biochemistry of food. Viewers learn what happens to fats, proteins, and carbohydrates during cooking; why foods taste either salty, sweet, bitter, or sour; how to interpret and make use of the glycemic index; and how the addition or substitution of an ingredient can make a dish unique, exciting, and typical of a certain country or region.
Online
2010