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1.

The Private Life of a Masterpiece: The Complete Seasons 1-5

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This award-winning series reveals the full and fascinating stories behind famous works of art, not just how they came to be created, but also how they influenced others and came to have a life of their own in the modern world. The works of art featured here are both instantly familiar and profoundly mysterious. Revolutionary in their conception, and iconic years after their execution, they each have their own compelling stories. For behind the beautiful canvases and sculptures are tales of political revolution, wartime escapes, massive ego clashes, social scandal, financial wrangling and shocking violence.
DVD
2008
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

Bolero: In Search of Cezanne

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The Bolero is a documentary capturing the essence of an orchestra conducted by Zubin Mehta. In Search of Cezanne explores the life and the legacy of 19th century French painter Paul Cezanne.
DVD
2007; 2002
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

Don't Eat the Pictures: Sesame Street at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

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The whole Sesame Street gang find themselves accidentally locked in the Metropolitan museum overnight. The video aims to entertain while it encourages children and their families to discover the treasures to be found in their local museums.
VHS
1987
Ivy (By Request)
4.

The Classical Ideal [electronic resource]: Imperial Stones of Rome

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Part I traces the origins of humanism and much of Western art to ancient Greece. It also discusses Kouroi and Korai figures and the architecture of the Parthenon. Part II identifies Roman art as inherently political art that concentrated on technical sophistication and detail and traces the decline of humanistic values in the late antique period when classical themes and forms were adapted to serve Christian purposes. Features art experts John Boardman and Richard Brilliant.
Online
1989
5.

A White Garment of Churches [electronic resource]: Romanesque and Gothic

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Part I describes how, with the fall of the Roman Empire, Christianity flourished and the Church became the patron of monumental Romanesque architecture and sculpture. In Part II, the medieval focus on heaven and the afterlife is expressed in works of Gothic architecture. The sculpture, and stained glass at St. Denis and Chartres are seen as architecture typical of High Gothic style and as evidence of a new theology and profound social changes during the twelfth and early thirteenth centuries. The video features conversations with experts Paul Crossley, William Clark, and Anne Prache.
Online
1989
6.

The Early Renaissance [electronic resource]: Italy and Northern Europe

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Part I covers the revival and reinterpretation of the classical tradition in the works of Florentine artists Masaccio, Brunelleschi, Boticelli, and Ghiberti and discusses how these artists exemplify the merging of Christian and humanistic values. Part II: Glowing color, made possible by the new medium of oil paint, and attention to minute detail sets the work of the Flemish masters apart. Examines the realism of Jan van Eyck and the spiritual crisis of northern Europe as revealed in Grüenwald's Isenheim altarpiece. The spirit of the Renaissance as reflected in Albrecht Dürer's work is also a topic of this program which features experts John White and Colin Eisler.
Online
1989
7.

An Age of Reason, an Age of Passion [electronic resource]

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Part I: The playful fantasy and provocative subjects of the Rococo style praticed by Watteau, Fragonard and Boucher, give way to strict Rationalism which insists on morality in art and the purity of classical form. Part II: Striving for individual expression, Romantic painters, Goya, Géricault and Delacroix demostrate a range of styles and subjects. Features experts Pierre Rosenberg and Robin Middleton.
Online
1989
8.

The High Renaissance [electronic resource]

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Part I covers key aspects of the High Renaissance, including the advent of the artist as genius (Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael) and the rise of Rome as a center of artistic vitality. Part II traces the Venetian preoccupation with the quality of light (Giorgione and Titian) and also examines the social turbulence of the late sixteenth century as expressed in this period's reinterpretation of classical architectural principles. Features experts Kathleen Weil-Garris Brandt and Colin Eisler.
Online
1989
9.

A Fresh View [electronic resource]: Impressionism and Post-Impressionism

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Part 1 describes how Courbet, rejected by the official salon, led a group of radical painters who, in turn, rejected the standard academic themes and techniques. Manet shocked Paris with "Luncheon on the Grass," while Impressionists represented the world bathed in changing light and color. Part 2 describes how Seurat, Van Gogh, Gauguin and Cézanne broke new ground with daring and imaginative use of color and approaches to form.
Online
1989
10.

Into the Twentieth Century [electronic resource]

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Part 1 explains how the Modern Age brought new energy and forms in Viennese building as well as painting, as Paris hosted the Fauves, Picasso and Cubism. Explores how Kandinski experimented with color abstraction. Part 2 explores the origin of the abstract and the surreal movements, and how Le Corbusier and Wright applied abstract principles to buidings. Explains that Dadi responded to World War I with nihilism, and the work of surrealists Dali, Magritte and Miró showed Freudian influence. Features commentaries by art experts Christopher Green and Margit Rowell.
Online
1989
11.

Visual Arts [electronic resource]

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Reveals how paintings, sculpture, and other works of visual art express ideals in their own language. Demonstrates how to identify the style, form, and subject matter of appropriate works to help draw out the cultural setting of literary texts.
Online
2003
12.

In Our Own Time [electronic resource]

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Part I tells how the appearance of Abstract Expressionism established New York as a center for the visual arts with a diversity of style represented in works by Pollock, Warhol, and Lichtenstein. The sculpture of Oldenburg, erased the boundary between art and commerce with soup cans, comic books and a Swiss army knife. Part II examines the explosive internationalization of the art world in the 1970s and 1980s, and discusses minimalism, environmental art, earthworks, performance pieces and the recognition of works by women artists. Experts Rosalind Krauss, Germano Celant and Clement Greenberg discuss the future of Modern Art.
Online
1989
13.

Guillermo Gómez-Peña [electronic resource]

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The Mexican performance artist, poet, journalist and activist is filmed in performance at Washington, D.C.'s Corocoran Gallery, the week before the 1996 Presidential election. The theme of his performance, that the United States/Mexican border is a psychological as well as a physical obstacle, is amplified by his explanation of the religious space he created so that people in the audience could reflect on their own racist attitudes toward other cultures, and investigate the complex dynamics that are at the core of the United State's relationship with Mexico and the Mexican people.
Online
1997
14.

Bill Viola [electronic resource]

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One of the world's leading video artists is filmed as he creates a work entitled, "The Greeting," after the theme of a 1528 painting by Jacopo Pontormo. Viola's interest in the Pontormo painting in not so much in its religious subject matter, but in the act of greeting itself, the psychologically "buried secrets" that are exposed in the moment of greeting.
Online
1997
15.

Hung Liu [electronic resource]

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Hung Liu's series of works entitled, "The Last Dynasty," utilizes virtually all the major principles of design and addresses the question of unity and variety in compositional and thematic terms. The artist describes her preparation for an exhibition at the Steinbaum/Krauss Gallery in New York in the autumn of 1995.
Online
1997
16.

Beverly Buchanan [electronic resource]

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As she constructs a pastel oilstick work from beginning to end, Beverly discusses the themes of her photography, painting, drawing and wood and metal sculpture of the rural Southern shack. Through her work she examines the psyche of the people who were once slaves but now live a life of conditional freedom. Transformed by her art, the shack is depicted not merely as habitat, but as aesthetic expression.
Online
1997
17.

June Wayne [electronic resource]

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Follows June Wayne, founder of the famous Tamarind Lithography Workshop, as she makes a new series of prints with master printer, Judith Solodkin in New York City in the fall of 1995. Her interest in scientific theory, space and atomic structure often influence her work and viewers see a prime example of the overlap. These prints focus on the discovery of so-called "knockout" mice by scientists at Johns Hopkins University. Male mice specifically bred to lack a gene essential for the production of nitric oxide are relentlessly aggressive against their fellow males. Wayne is fascinated by the prospect that the lack of this gene might be involved in some percentage of human aggression.
Online
1997
18.

Milton Resnick [electronic resource]

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One of the last living members of the New York School of painters or abstract expressionists, Resnick is filmed as he paints five large canvases.
Online
1997
19.

Judy Baca [electronic resource]

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Known for her mile-long Los Angeles mural depicting Chicano history, Judy Baca creates a mural for the student center at the University of Southern California. She also works on a grouping of large portraits that are a "re-visioning" of Ford Ord, the military base that was the largest single staging area for the Vietnam War. Both projects illustrate Baca's unique process, which is designed to unite the participants in producing a work of public art based on shared discoveries, visions and dreams; a society's perception of itself.
Online
1997
20.

Goat Island [electronic resource]

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Working collectively and collaboratively, Goat Island, a remarkable performance troupe based in Chicago, rehearses the piece, "How Dear to Me the Hour When Daylight Dies," critically acclaimed as one of the most challenging and innovative performance art works of the day. A workshop presented in England, demonstrates the group's typical style of theater, a fusion of visual imagery, music, dance, movement and narration designed to evoke personal responses in individual members of their audiences.
Online
1997