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1.

Kelp Crab

While exploring the intertidal zone at a San Diego beach, Professor Trujillo focuses on the kelp crab.
Online
2018; 2010
2.

Spreading

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk observes that spreading decreases the energy of sound as it travels. Energy loss due to spreading is proportional to the square of the distance from the source.
Online
2015; 2011
3.

Sonar

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about sonar, which stands for sound navigation and ranging, the process by which objects (like submarines, for example) are discovered when sound waves are reflected off of them and then detected.
Online
2015; 2011
4.

Wild Extremes

The most extreme and wild parts of New Zealand are in the South Island, which lies towards Antarctica, in the path of the tempestuous "roaring forties." This is home to some of the most rapidly rising mountains in the world, the Southern Alps. From hyper-intelligent parrots to sinister snails with teeth and magical constellations of glow-worms, this is the story of New Zealand's wildest places and its most resilient pioneers, all of whom must embrace radical solutions to survive.
Online
2017; 2016
5.

Early Evidence of Continental Drift

Geophysicist and geologist Tanya Atwater points to the jig-saw puzzle fit of Africa and South America as the most obvious evidence supporting the theory of continental drift.
Online
2015; 2011
6.

Brown Sea Hare

While exploring the intertidal zone at a San Diego beach, Professor Trujillo focuses on the brown sea hare.
Online
2018; 2010
7.

Antartic Edge: 70 Degrees South

A thrilling journey to one of the world's most perilous environments, Antarctic Edge: 70° South follows a team of scientists as they explore the West Antarctic Peninsula. In the wake of devastating climate events like Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Katrina, oceanographer Oscar Schofield teams up with a group of researchers in a race to understand climate change in the fastest warming place on earth. While navigating through 60-foot waves and dangerous icebergs on a world-class icebreaker, the scientists travel to 70° south — to a rugged and inhospitable island called Charcot — with an arsenal of cutting-edge technology that will revolutionize how climate change is studied.
Online
2017; 2015
8.

Ocean Waves

While exploring the intertidal zone at a San Diego beach, Professor Trujillo focuses on ocean waves.
Online
2018; 2010
9.

Scripps Institution #2

Professor Trujillo interviews Dr. Michael Latz from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography who discusses and demonstrates bioluminescence.
Online
2018; 2010
10.

Brittle Star

While exploring the intertidal zone at a San Diego beach, Professor Trujillo focuses on the brittle star.
Online
2018; 2010
11.

Sea Hare

While exploring the intertidal zone at a San Diego beach, Professor Trujillo focuses on the sea hare.
Online
2018; 2010
12.

Differences Between Oceans and Continents (Part 2)

Geophysicist and geologist Tanya Atwater compares the relatively neat sea floor with continents, which she terms a "mess." She attributes these differences to the predictable and "tidy" process of seafloor spreading, as compared to the crashing together of continental structures.
Online
2015; 2011
13.

Seafloor Spreading: Vine and Matthews

Geophysicist and geologist Tanya Atwater talks about work done by Fred Vine and Drummond Matthews that ultimately provided proof of seafloor spreading by tracking the patterns of magnetic striping on the ocean floor.
Online
2015; 2011
14.

Wegener's Mistakes

Geophysicist and geologist Tanya Atwater talks about mistakes made by Alfred Wegener in formulating his theory of continental drift, some of which created doubt and skepticism among fellow geologists.
Online
2015; 2011
15.

Heard Island Test and Climate Change, the

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about efforts to measure ocean warming through sound in a test done near Heard Island, an area considered unique because sound emanating from that point can theoretically reach every ocean basin on Earth.
Online
2015; 2011
16.

Using Sound to Measure Ocean Warming

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about efforts to measure ocean warming through the use of sound--a process known as dark acoustic thermometry. Professor Munk notes that since the speed of sound increases in the ocean with temperature, the time it takes for a pulse to cross a body of water should diminish as the water gets warmer.
Online
2015; 2011
17.

Wave Prediction and the Normandy Invasion

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about the role wave prediction played in the planning of the Normandy Invasion during World War II. He recalls that the invasion was actually postponed one day because of predictions of unfavorable wave conditions.
Online
2015; 2011
18.

Marine Animals and Sound

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about the use of sound by marine animals. Professor Monk observes that while scientists don't fully understand all the ways marine animals use sound, it is generally believed that animals in the marine environment probably use sound to search for food and mates, as well during the navigation process.
Online
2015; 2011
19.

Seafloor Spreading and Plate Tectonics (Part One)

Geophysicist and geologist Tanya Atwater talks about the role of seafloor spreading and spreading centers in the plate tectonics process.
Online
2015; 2011
20.

Temperature and the Velocity of Sound

Renowned oceanographer and geophysicist Walter Munk talks about the relationship between temperature and the velocity of sound, observing that velocity increases with temperature. Because temperature generally increases anywhere from ten to twenty degrees moving up from one kilometer to the surface, so, too, does the speed of sound generally increase closer to the surface.
Online
2015; 2011