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Applied Mathematics
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1.

Decimals and Exponents [electronic resource]

This video describes how whole numbers and decimals are used in the monetary system, how to calculate costs in foreign currencies, and how to use exponents. Dramatized segments and computer animations focus on ways to determine the international value of U.S. dollars at a currency exchange; select chairs for an interior decorating job while staying within a budget; and calculate interstellar distances using scientific notation-and imagination.
Online
2005; 1995
2.

Measurement [electronic resource]

This video describes how to estimate costs of products and services, determine the circumference of an object and its effect on motion, and calculate area and volume. Dramatized segments and computer animations illustrate ways to use measurements taken from blueprints to estimate construction costs; determine tire sizes, which affect vehicle speed; and calculate a running track's circumference to fairly stagger the start lines.
Online
2005; 1995
3.

Coordinates [electronic resource]

This video describes how to identify points, plot ordered pairs on a graph, use map coordinates to find locations, and apply graphical break-even analysis to linear functions. Dramatized segments and computer animations illustrate ways to describe positions on a game board by using coordinates; program an industrial robot to assemble TVs in a factory; use a road map while traveling; and evaluate the impact of franchise costs and product prices on profit at a frozen yogurt bar company.
Online
2008; 1995
4.

Is God a Number? [electronic resource]: Maths That Mimic the Mind

If mathematics underpins the elegant precision of the macroscopic and microscopic worlds, is there a Master Mathematician as well? This fascinating program examines the computational paradigms being used to model human consciousness and to quantify reality, from Euclidean geometry to fractal transform algorithms. Oxford mathematician Sir Roger Penrose, quantum physicist Reverend John Polkinghorne, compression technology expert Michael Barnsley, and physiologist Horace Barlow seek to understand how the brain functions-and grope for evidence of a guiding force. Outstanding computer graphics enhance this exploration of inner and outer space.
Online
2007; 1998
5.

Introduction to Math in Technology [electronic resource]

Introduction to Math in Technology is an eleven-minute video which is part of the series, Math in Technology. "But why do I need math?" Now, using this series, give students a clear, definitive, and logical answer. Math is necessary to get the job done in most technical fields, including auto mechanics, electricity/electronics, and the building trades. Each video shows real-life problem situations solved by using practical math and actual computations on the screen. Use Introduction to Math in Technology as an overview and then progress to specific topics. At last..a program to help your students succeed in the world of technical math.
Online
2005; 1998
6.

Bows, Arrows, and Aircraft Carriers [electronic resource]: Moving Bodies With Constant Mass

In this program, geometry is combined with approximation to solve relatively complex problems involving shooting an arrow and landing an airplane on the deck of an aircraft carrier. Emphasizing the value of sketching as a visualization tool, the program also explains how the solution of the archery problem, through geometric inversion, can help solve the problem of a plane landing.
Online
2006; 1999
7.

Impulse [electronic resource]: Moving Bodies With Variable Mass

Using Newton's second law and a balloon-powered toy car, this program examines how impulse relates to the change in momentum and how the rate of that change equates to the resultant force. In addition, the exhaust velocity of the jet-propelled car is estimated.
Online
2006; 1999
8.

Modeling Vectors [electronic resource]

Employing diverse examples such as trains and water slides, this program illustrates the use of vectors to represent forces operating in both two and three dimensions. The algebraic manipulation of vectors in modeling problems is featured.
Online
2006; 1999
9.

Kites [electronic resource]: Modeling With Vectors

After defining the basic concepts of vectors, this program uses algebra to determine how the resultant of numerous forces acting on a body can be obtained and then equated to the product of mass and acceleration. Kites are employed to exemplify both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions.
Online
2006; 1999
10.

Doors, Heart Valves, and Flic-Flacs [electronic resource]: Moments

After explaining the principle of moments, this program shows how apparently dissimilar physical phenomena are actually mathematically similar through the examples of a synthetic heart valve, a lock gate, and the gymnastic maneuver known as a flic-flac, or back handspring. The need to make careful approximations during the modeling process is stressed.
Online
2006; 1999
11.

Bikes and Cars [electronic resource]: Centripetal Acceleration

This program considers the idea that circular motion must imply a force or component of a force toward the center of a circle, as in the Newtonian theory of how the Moon orbits the Earth. The reasons why bicyclists lean during turns, why roads are banked, and why car tires react as they do during a turn are investigated.
Online
2006; 1999
12.

Damping [electronic resource]: Simple Harmonic Motion

This program investigates how the mathematical model of simple harmonic motion becomes more complex through the introduction of damping. The application of simple modeling techniques to create homogeneous linear second-order differential equations is illustrated.
Online
2006; 1999
13.

Math in Automotive Technology [electronic resource]

Math in Automotive Technology is an eleven-minute video which is part of the series, Math in Technology. "But why do I need math?" Now, using this series, give students a clear, definitive, and logical answer. Math is necessary to get the job done in most technical fields, including auto mechanics, electricity/electronics, and the building trades. Each video shows real-life problem situations solved by using practical math and actual computations on the screen. Use Introduction to Math in Technology as an overview and then progress to specific topics. At last..a program to help your students succeed in the world of technical math.
Online
2005; 1998
14.

Math in Construction Technology [electronic resource]

In this dramatized program, a contractor trainee prepares an exterior painting estimate for a house that has been vandalized by taking exact measurements, calculating square footage using geometry, adding cost of materials, and multiplying labor costs per hour. Afterward, a group of teens gets ready to build a bike repair shed by reading blueprints, calculating floor area, and squaring the shop's footprint by equalizing the floor's diagonal measurements.
Online
2005; 1998
15.

Math in Electrical Technology [electronic resource]

Math in Electrical Technology is an eleven-minute video which is part of the series, Math in Technology. "But why do I need math?" Now, using this series, give students a clear, definitive, and logical answer. Math is necessary to get the job done in most technical fields, including auto mechanics, electricity/electronics, and the building trades. Each video shows real-life problem situations solved by using practical math and actual computations on the screen. Use Introduction to Math in Technology as an overview and then progress to specific topics. At last..a program to help your students succeed in the world of technical math.
Online
2005; 1998
16.

Parachuting [electronic resource]: Moving Bodies With Constant Mass

This program uses a parachutist to demonstrate the effects of drag on the force of gravity, showing how to make mathematical approximations and how the resultant forces can be equated to the product of mass and acceleration. A first-order differential equation is then used to find the minimum height from which a parachutist can jump without injury.
Online
2006; 1999
17.

Pendulum [electronic resource]: Simple Harmonic Motion

This program introduces the concept of simple harmonic motion through the operation of the pendulum. The findings of Galileo and his contemporaries on the mechanics of the pendulum are presented, along with examples of pendular motion drawn from the modern world.
Online
2006; 1999
18.

Probability [electronic resource]

This video describes how to use statistics to determine risk and how to calculate the likelihood of two and three independent events occurring simultaneously. Dramatized segments and computer animations involve learning how risk factors influence the cost of car insurance; assessing a fire department's request for a new truck and crew; and figuring out the odds of dice combinations.
Online
2005; 1995
19.

Reading a Ruler [electronic resource]: English and Metric Measurements

In the first lesson, the different forms of English measurement are discussed and displayed as they would appear on a ruler. The viewer also learns how to understand fractions when measuring and how to find exact measurements using a ruler. The second lesson deals with the metric system by introducing the meter and other metric measurements. Viewers learn how to read a meter stick, and common abbreviations of metric measurements are discussed. Viewers also learn how to convert measurements using the decimal point.
Online
2005; 1994
20.

Resonance [electronic resource]: Simple Harmonic Motion

In this program, resonance is examined. The value of mathematical models is demonstrated through the physics of applying a time-varying force to a body that fundamentally exhibits simple harmonic motion. Solution techniques for general linear second-order differential equations are featured.
Online
2006; 1999