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African Americans — Interviews
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1.

Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975

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"THE BLACK POWER MIXTAPE 1967-1975 mobilizes a treasure trove of 16mm material shot by Swedish journalists who came to the US drawn by stories of urban unrest and revolution. Gaining access to many of the leaders of the Black Power Movement Stokely Carmichael, Bobby Seale, Angela Davis and Eldridge Cleaver among them the filmmakers captured them in intimate moments and remarkably unguarded interviews. Thirty years later, this lush collection was found languishing in the basement of Swedish Television." Description from mrqe.com.
DVD
2011
2.

The Black Candle

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A documentary that uses Kwanzaa as a vehicle to explore the struggle and triumph of African-American family, community, and culture.
DVD
2008
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

South [electronic resource]: The Black Belt

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Gates travels to Memphis, Birmingham and Atlanta - once the battlegrounds on which civil rights were won for black southerners in the 1950s and 60s. The very cities from which African Americans fled during the era of legal segregation are today drawing them back by the tens of thousands. But how much have these cities really changed since the civil rights era? Interviewees include Morgan Freeman and Maya Angelou.
Online
2005; 2003
4.

Chicago [electronic resource]: Streets of Heaven

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Gates goes inside the notorious housing projects in Chicago's South Side - the Robert Taylor and the Ida B. Wells - to find out from the people who live there what life is like for America's "underclass." "What happened to the city of refuge my father's generation sought in the North; North where 'the streets of Heaven were paved with gold'?" wonders Gates. Caught up in a culture of criminality, poverty and despair, is there any hope for the fifth of black Americans who have been left behind?
Online
2005; 2003
5.

East Coast [electronic resource]: Ebony Towers

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The existence of a small group of African Americans at the heart of the political establishment and at the pinnacle of corporate America is something that, just two decades ago, seemed unimaginable. How did they get there and what is the significance of their success? Beginning at Harvard, Gates travels to Washington, DC, and New York to ask if this new black power elite represents genuine progress for black America as a whole. Interviewees include Colin Powell, Russell Simmons, Vernon Jordan, Franklin Raines and the first African-American chess grandmaster in history, Maurice Ashley.
Online
2005; 2003
6.

Los Angeles [electronic resource]: Black Hollywood

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Does the unprecedented success of African-American actors at the last Oscars signal a genuine shift in the way race operates in the movie business? In the final episode, Gates asks whether Hollywood is institutionally racist or whether it is becoming increasingly color-blind in pursuit of the box office dollar. Interviewees include Chris Tucker, Samuel L. Jackson, Alicia Keys, Quincy Jones, Nia Long, Don Cheadle and John Singleton.
Online
2005; 2003
7.

The Black List: Volume Two

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"In this follow-up to the NAACP Image Award-winning The Black List: Volume One, interviewer Elvis Mitchell and director Timothy Greenfield-Sanders explore 15 new African-American lives on the cusp of this historic moment. Now more than ever, The Black List continues a riveting and singular work of video portraiture." - Container
DVD
2009
Clemons (Stacks)
8.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With Edward Gardner

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Entrepreneur and educator Edward George Gardner was born on February 25, 1925, in Chicago, Illinois. Following service in the U.S. Army during World War II, Gardner returned to Chicago and received his B.A. degree from Chicago Teacher's College and later his M.A. degree from the University of Chicago. During his fourteen years as an instructor and school administrator for the Chicago Public Schools, he worked part time as a black hair care sales representative. Learning of the dissatisfaction of many African American consumers and hair care professionals, he and his wife, Bettiann, launched Soft Sheen Products from the basement of their home in 1964. In 1998, Gardner sold his business to L'Oreal of Paris and passed the day-to-day operation of Soft Sheen on to his children. Gardner al [...]
Online
2016
9.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With William Warfield

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Opera singer and educator William Caesar Warfield was born on January 22, 1920 in West Helena, Arkansas. Warfield attended the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester, where he received his B.A. degree in music studies in 1942. He first acted in the Broadway show Call Me Mister, and was cast in 1948's Set My People Free and 1950's Regina. In 1950, Warfield was cast in the film adaptation of Show Boat and made his New York City Town Hall debut. In 1952, he starred in Porgy and Bess alongside his wife, opera legend Leontyne Price, and later toured internationally with the U.S. Department of State. Warfield also taught music at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Northwestern University. He received a 1984 Grammy Awa [...]
Online
2016
10.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With Tyrone Davis

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R&B singer Tyrone Davis was born on May 4, 1938, in Greenville, Mississippi. In 1952, Davis left the Jim Crow South to join his father in Detroit, Michigan. By 1957, he had settled in Chicago, Illinois and became immersed in the local blues scene. In the late 1960s, having performed in small clubs on Chicago's South Side, Davis began recording original blues tracks for the Four Brothers label. One of those tracks, "Can I Change My Mind?" catapulted him onto the Billboard charts. The song eventually sold more than a million copies and thrust Davis into the limelight. Davis enjoyed a long and successful career as a musician. His work contains more than fifty hit songs including: "Turn Back the Hands of Time", "Turning Pointe", "Give It Up (Turn It Loose)", "Can I Change My Mind?", "In [...]
Online
2016
11.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With Jacoby Dickens

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Entrepreneur Jacoby Dickens was born in 1931, in Panama City, Florida. Early in his childhood, Dickens' family moved to Chicago, Illinois, and lived on the City's South Side. After high school, Dickens served in the U.S. Army before returning to Chicago. His first entrepreneurial success came with his purchase of real estate. He was then invited to join the board of Seaway National Bank, one of the largest African American-owned financial institutions in the nation, where he became chairman in 1983. Dickenss distinguished himself just as much for his philanthropic efforts as for his entrepreneurial successes. In addition to the community outreach programs developed through Seaway Bank, Dickens designed a loan and scholarship program at DePaul University named in his honor. He also do [...]
Online
2016
12.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With Merri Dee

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Media personality Merri Dee was raised in Chicago and New Orleans, where she developed a passion for journalism in school. She began her broadcast career in 1966, as a radio personality, then moved to WGN-TV in 1972. While at the height of her career, Dee and her talk show guest were abducted from the station and nearly killed. The incident led Dee to lobby for the passage of Illinois' first Victims Bill of Rights legislation. Dee became the director of community relations at WGN where she served as a liaison to Chicago's civic community. Additionally, her dedication as an advocate for orphans helped spark a fifty percent increase in the number of adoptions in the State of Illinois. During her broadcast career, Dee hosted the United Negro College Fund Telethon and founded the Chicago [...]
Online
2016
13.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With Dempsey J. Travis

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Author, historian, and real estate entrepreneur Dempsey Jerome Travis was born in Chicago, Illinois on February 25, 1920. Travis attended Roosevelt University, receiving his B.S. degree in 1949. He founded Travis Realty Corporation and Sivart Mortgage Company, establishing himself in the development of Chicago's South Side. In 1960, Travis also founded United Mortgage Bankers of America and the Dempsey Travis Securities and Investment Corporation. He was a coordinator of Dr. Martin Luther King's 1960 March on Chicago and was president of the NAACP's Chicago chapter from 1959 to 1960. Travis also founded the Urban Research Press in 1969. Urban Research Press has published seven nonfiction books by Travis. Travis received several awards in recognition of his accomplishments in business [...]
Online
2016
14.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With Eddie Thomas

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Music promoter Eddie Thomas was born November 5, 1931. He aspired to go to West Point Military Academy, but personal misfortune prevented him from doing so. While Thomas was holding two jobs, his life changed when two vocal groups asked him to manage them, the Roosters and the Impressions. The career of the Impressions skyrocketed with the release of their hit song "For Your Precious Love." Thomas also found and worked with singer Curtis Mayfield, with whom he enjoyed a long association. After having such hits as "Keep on Pushing," "Amen" and "It's All Right," they formed Curtom Records. It was one of the first record labels owned by an African American recording artist. In the mid-1970s, Thomas formed his own successful record promotion business - one of the largest companies in the [...]
Online
2016
15.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With Katherine Dunham

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Choreographer and anthropologist Katherine Dunham was born on June 22, 1909, in Chicago, Illinois. Her father was African American, while Dunham's mother was French-Canadian. Dunham became interested in dance at an early age but she did not seriously pursue a dance career until she was a student at the University of Chicago. Dunham began to study the African roots of dance and, in 1935, traveled to the Caribbean for field research. She returned to the United States in 1936, informed by new methods of movement and expression that she incorporated into techniques that transformed the world of dance. In 1940, she formed the Katherine Dunham Dance Company. Called the "Matriarch of Black Dance," her groundbreaking repertoire combined innovative interpretations of Caribbean dances, traditi [...]
Online
2016
16.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With Earl G. Graves, Sr.

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Publisher Earl Graves was born on January 9, 1935 in Brooklyn, New York, growing up in a household of strong discipline and high expectations. He became an Army Green Beret leaving the rank of captain. Graves received his B.S. degree in economics from Morgan State University in 1958. Following a brief career as a real estate agent, Graves spent three years working with Senator Robert F. Kennedy. In the early 1970s, Graves decided to start a newsletter which would be the precursor to Black Enterprise magazine. Since founding Black Enterprise, Graves helped foster the growth of a vibrant African American business community. In 2006, his son, Earl "Butch" Graves, Jr. succeeded Graves in his post as chief executive officer of Earl Graves, Ltd., the corporation that published Black Enterp [...]
Online
2016
17.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With Marshall Thompson

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Drummer Marshall Thompson was born on December 23, 1940, and grew up on Chicago's South Side. As a child, he played his snare drum on the corner of 47th and St. Lawrence, thus beginning a lifelong love of music. Growing up, Thompson would try to sneak into the Regal Theater only to be thrown out. He persisted, landing a job in 1960 as the house drummer for the Regal Theater. In 1960, he and other musicians formed the Hi-Lites. They soon achieved notoriety with half a dozen singles on the local Dakar and Ja-Wes labels. Because their name conflicted with that of another local group, they changed their name to the Chi-Lites, aligning themselves with Chicago. Their first hit, "Let Me Be The Man My Daddy Was," made the national charts, and hits like "Have You Seen Her" and "Oh, Girl" gain [...]
Online
2016
18.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With Col. William R. Thompson

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Military officer William R. Thompson was born in the Wiley Avenue section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on January 26, 1916. His mother died when he was fourteen days old. Thompson received his B.S. degree in business administration from Hampton University in Virginia. During his senior year, he became a licensed pilot and entered the service in 1940 as one of the first African American aviation cadets admitted to the U.S. Army Air Corps. These cadets were later known as members of the 99th Squadron of the Tuskegee Airmen. As part of the 99th Squadron, Thompson served as an armament officer under the guidance of General Benjamin O. Davis. He served as unofficial photographer for the 99th Squadron and parts of his collection reside in the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C [...]
Online
2016
19.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With Reverend Dr. Angelique Walker-Smith

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Minister and television host Reverend Dr. Angelique Walker-Smith, was born on August 18, 1958 in Cleveland, Ohio. As a child, she spent summers and holidays in rural Alabama with her family. After attending both public and private schools, Walker-Smith went to Kent State University, graduating with her B.S. degree in telecommunications. She decided to follow in her father's footsteps and entered Yale University Divinity School. Completing her M.A. degree in 1983 in divinity, Walker-Smith became the first African American woman to graduate from the Doctor of Ministry Program at Princeton Theological Seminary. Walker-Smith served as the executive director of the Church Federation of Greater Indianapolis. Walker-Smith lived in three African countries and traveled extensively throughout [...]
Online
2016
20.

The HistoryMakers Video Oral History With the Honorable Ann Claire Williams

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Judge Ann Williams was born on August 16, 1949 and raised in Detroit, Michigan. Williams graduated from Wayne State University in 1970 with her B.A degree in elementary education and earned her M.A. degree from the University of Michigan. Williams began her legal career as law clerk with Judge Robert A. Sprecher in the U.S. Court of Appeals. In 1985, President Ronald Reagan appointed Williams as one of the youngest federal judges. In 1993, Williams was appointed the first African American and woman to Chair of the Court Administration and Case Management Committee (CACM). In August 1999, President Bill Clinton nominated Williams to the U.S. Court of Appeals. She was confirmed in November 1999. During her career, Williams was actively involved in many judicial and educational activiti [...]
Online
2016