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African Americans — History
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1.

King: A Filmed Record -- Montgomery to Memphis

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"King ... is the landmark documentary that chronicles the life and non-violent campaigns for civil rights of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., beginning with the Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1957 and culminating with his assassination in Memphis in 1968 ... [C]ombines dramatic readings by Harry Belafonte, James Earl Jones and Paul Newman, among others with newsreel and archival footage to create a powerful and comprehensive record of Dr. Kings legacy and the American Civil Rights movement." -- container
DVD
2012; 1970
Clemons (Stacks)
2.

John Henrik Clarke: A Great and Mighty Walk

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John Henrik Clarke discusses the history of African-Americans, placing it within the context of the history of Africa and its relationship with Greek, Roman, European, Christian, and Islamic civilizations.
DVD
2011; 1996
Clemons (Stacks)
3.

African American Lives

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A compelling combination of storytelling and science, this series uses genealogy, oral histories, family stories and DNA to trace roots of several accomplished African Americans down through American history and back to Africa.
DVD
2006
Clemons (Stacks)
4.

Banished

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Documentary about three communities which forcibly expelled African American residents between the Civil War and the Great Depression. Includes interviews with residents from those communities: Pierce City, Missouri; Harrison, Arkansas; Forsyth County, Georgia.
DVD
2007
Clemons (Stacks)
5.

African American Lives 2; African American Lives Two

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A compelling combination of storytelling and science, this series uses genealogy, oral histories, family stories and DNA to trace roots of several accomplished African Americans down through American history and back to Africa.
DVD
2008
Clemons (Stacks)
6.

John Henrik Clarke: A Great and Mighty Walk

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John Henrik Clarke discusses the history of Afro-Americans, placing it within the context of the history of Africa and Africans and their relationship with non-African civilizations such as Greek, Roman, European, Christian, and Islamic.
VHS
1998
Ivy (By Request)
7.

Where Did You Get That Woman?

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Septuagenarian Joan Williams, washroom attendant in a Chicago bar for twenty years, reminisces about her life from her childhood in Oklahoma to the present. Sepia-toned file photographs evoke the history her life spans and highlight this commentary on human life and spirit.
VHS
1982
Ivy (By Request)
8.

This Far by Faith, African-American Spiritual Journeys: Episode 1 There Is a River [electronic resource]

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There is a river explores the evolution of African-American religious thought, from the beliefs and rituals Africans brought to America to the influence of Christian teachings imposed on slaves in the new world. It charts the growth of independent black churches and attempts by slaves and free blacks to unify the black community. Through the lives of two nineteenth-century black leaders, Sojourner Truth and Denmark Vesey, we see how religion and belief in God provided hope in the face of desperation. -- container.
Online
2005; 2003
9.

This Far by Faith, African-American Spiritual Journeys: Episode 2 God Is a Negro [electronic resource]

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God is a Negro focuses on the role of Henry McNeal Turner, whose efforts to create a sense of self-respect among African-Americans began in the political arena and shifted to the religious realm. His emphasis on a black nationalist philosophy and his rejection of white power alienated him from some leaders, but led to a greater role for the black church in African-American culture. Turner's philosophy and teachings encouraged his followers to find God from within, raising their opinions about themselves and all black people.
Online
2005; 2003
10.

This Far by Faith, African-American Spiritual Journeys: Episode 3 Guide My Feet [electronic resource]

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Guide my feet follows the movement of African-Americans from the South to the promised land of the North, from country to city, from rejection to hope. It is also the story of Cecil Williams and Thomas A. Dorsey, two men a generation apart but united by a vision to take the stark reality of the streets into the church, challenging Christianity to be true to its promise of acceptance. In Chicago, Thomas Dorsey pioneers a different direction for spiritual expression: gospel music. In San Francisco, the Reverend Cecil Williams strives to pull down barriers with his "come as you are" church. Through their efforts, Dorsey, Williams and others create a new faith and a new music.
Online
2005; 2003
11.

This Far by Faith, African-American Spiritual Journeys: Episode 4 Freedom Faith [electronic resource]

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Freedom faith traces the connections between "Freedom faith"--the belief that God intended all people to be equal and free--and the Civil Rights Movement. Faith give black families a way of insulating themselves from the oppression of segregation in the 1940s and 1950s, and provided the seeds for opposition to Jim Crow. Many of the protests of the 1960s are shown from the perspective of Prathia Hall, an eminent black preacher who was born in 1940 and literally grew up with the movement. Hall is one of many voices in the film--voices of ordinary people who, through faith, risk their lives to challenge America to live up to its promise of equality.
Online
2005; 2003
12.

This Far by Faith, African-American Spiritual Journeys: Episode 5 Inheritors of the Faith [electronic resource]

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Inheritors of the faith follows the journeys of African-Americans who seek a spiritual experience in the traditions of Islam and Yoruba. Originating in West Africa and pre-dating Christianity, Yoruba focuses on honoring ancestors, and worshipers gain strength and spirituality from within. Another emerging spiritual direction is the Nation of Islam, led by Elijah Muhammad. When Muhammad's son, Warith Deen, takes over the movement after his father's death, he transforms the organization to more closely follow the practice of orthodox Islam. Louis X. Farrakhan resurrects the ideology of the old Nation of Islam in 1978.
Online
2005; 2003
13.

This Far by Faith, African-American Spiritual Journeys: Episode 6 Rise Up and Call Their Names [electronic resource]

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Rise up and call their names follows 60 people in the Interfaith Pilgrimage of the Middle Passage on a physical and spiritual voyage as they walk from Massachusetts to Florida, than make their way to the Caribbean and ultimately to Africa. Their purpose is to pray for the spirits of their ancestors, and to discover for themselves the spiritual value of such a journey. After months of difficult travel and deep soul-searching, the pilgrims reach Africa with a stronger sense of identity and purpose.
Online
2005; 2003
14.

A Vital Progressivism [electronic resource]

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Professor Martin offers a fresh perspective on Progressivism, arguing that its spirit can be best seen in the daily struggle of ordinary people. In a discussion with Professors Scharff and Miller, the struggles of Native Americans, Asian Americans and African Americans are placed in the context of the traditional white Progressive movement.
Online
2000
15.

Civil Rights [electronic resource]: Demanding Equality

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Examines the guarantees of political and social equality in the U.S. Constitution and the roles that individuals and government have played in expanding these guarantees to African Americans, women, and the disabled. Case studies include the landmark case of Brown vs. the Board of Education, the fight for equal opportunities for women athletes in Michigan, and the history of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.
Online
2003
16.

King: Montgomery to Memphis

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A chronicle of the struggle for racial equality and justice from 1955 to 1968.
VHS
1970
Ivy (By Request)
17.

By River, by Rail [electronic resource]: History of the Black Migration

In the early 20th century, blacks moved north in hope of a better life with little more than a prayer and the shirts on their backs. In this program, poet Maya Angelou, NAACP President Kweisi Mfume, and a host of other African-Americans recount the story of the migration, of separated families, and of the hardships, prejudice, and struggle for acceptance in the North that resulted in disillusionment. Black luminaries include James Cameron, author of A Time of Terror; Jacob Lawrence, artist and creator of The Black Migration series; and Dr. Julius Garvey, son of Marcus Garvey, founder of the Universal Negro Improvement Association and the Back to Africa movement of the 1920s.
Online
2006; 1994
18.

Found Voices [electronic resource]: Slave Narratives

How did it feel to be bought and sold like cattle, only to be liberated with nowhere to go and no one to turn to for help? In this profoundly moving program, Ted Koppel of ABC News presents the African-American slave experience in the voices of those who knew it firsthand. Thanks to tapes-now digitally remastered-from a project undertaken during the 1930s and 40s by John Henry Falke and others, 101-year-old Fountain Hughes, who was born in 1848, and other ex-slaves give their recollections of life before Emancipation and during Reconstruction.
Online
2006; 1999
19.

Duke Ellington's Washington [electronic resource]: Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of a Neighborhood

During the early 20th century, Washington, D.C., was the cultural capital of black America. Prefiguring Harlem in the 1920s, D.C.'s Uptown area nurtured dynamic figures such as Duke Ellington, Langston Hughes, Mary Church Terrell, Justice Thurgood Marshall, and Dr. Charles Drew. In this program, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Hedrick Smith tells the often-overlooked story of the heyday, decline, and renewal of Uptown. Combined with rare photographs and archival footage, sparkling interviews with jazz pianist Billy Taylor, Ellington biographer John Hasse, historians James Horton and Edward Smith, and others describe the community's halcyon days, the post-desegregation exodus that opened the door to urban decay, and efforts that are reclaiming and renewing the neighborhood.
Online
2006; 1999
20.

Presenting Mr. Frederick Douglass [electronic resource]: Lesson of Hour

The great abolitionist Frederick Douglass comes back to life in this acclaimed theatrical performance featuring Fred Morsell, as he dramatically re-creates Douglass's famous speech on slavery and human rights. With an eloquence and intelligence rarely matched, Frederick Douglass became a giant in the struggle against racial injustice. He called upon all Americans of every color to work to fulfill the vision of a just society that was proclaimed in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. This program was filmed at the Metropolitan A.M.E. Church in Washington, D.C., where Douglass delivered his celebrated last speech, "The Lesson of the Hour," over a century ago. A Bill Moyers special.
Online
2005; 1989