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161.

Clarendon County (S.C.) Locations September 21, 1987.

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Disc 213. Journalist John Norton describes the education situation in Clarendon County, South Carolina. At 7:18, footage of Clarendon County, South Carolina, including rural roads, Liberty Hill Church, cotton gin. Disc 214. Footage of Clarendon County, South Carolina, including cotton picking. Disc 215. Footage of Clarendon County, South Carolina, including cotton picking, cemetery and church, sunset.
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
162.

Interview With James Duren September 20, 1987.

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Disc 203. James Duren explains how he became an activist for education in Clarendon County, South Carolina, by uncovering corruption in Clarendon School District One. He formed a parents group that grew into 200 members to fight the misuse of money by the district. Other parents describe how they became involved and actions they took to try to change the situation. Summmerton in Clarendon County, South Carolina, was the district involved in Briggs v. Elliott, one of the cases in Brown v. Board of Education. Disc 204. Clarendon County business people and parents of students in Clarendon School District One describe the fraud, mismanagement and extremely low educational standards of the district. Disc 205. Similar content to Disc 204. Disc 206. Clarendon County business people and pare [...]
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
163.

Interview With Jeff Brown September 21, 1987.

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Disc 216. Footage of Chester High School band and football team, Chester, South Carolina. Discs 217 to 220. Principal Jeff Brown gives a tour of Chester High School, Chester, South Carolina. Disc 220. At 19:20, Mr. Brown attends a Chester Rotary Club meeting. Then more footage at high school. Disc 221. Footage of students at Chester High School. At 7:20, interview with Principal Jeff Brown. Mr. Brown recalls what schools were like when he began his career in education. Disc 222. Principal Jeff Brown recounts the early days of his education career in Chester, South Carolina. He describes the separate but equal doctrine and how the community imposed certain strictures on black teachers. He also talks about the changes brought by integration. Disc 223. Interview with Principal Jeff Brow [...]
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
164.

South Carolina Locations September 23, 1987.

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Disc 227. Footage of Clinton College and Friendship College in South Carolina. Disc 228. Footage of road in South Carolina. At 15:04 footage of South Carolina State Capitol in Columbia. Disc 229. Footage of South Carolina State Capitol in Columbia.
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
165.

Monticello Locations October 25, 1987.

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Disc 234. Footage of Pennsylvania Avenue moving toward the Capitol. At 9:42, footage of Monticello interiors. Disc 235. Footage of Monticello interiors. Disc 237. Footage of Monticello interiors and exterior.
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
166.

Interview With Louis T. Rader October 25, 1987.

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Disc 239. Historian William H. Harbaugh describes the irony of John W. Davis defending the separate but equal doctrine in Brown v. the Board of Education and explains why Davis took the case as its appellate lawyer. Harbaugh also comments on Thurgood Marshall's opinion of Davis. At 9:20 interview with engineer and business professor Louis T. Rader begins. Mr. Rader talks about his life and career, as well as his support of public education in the promotion of a successful business climate. During Massive Resistance, he protested closing Virginia public schools using the argument that businesses don't want to operate in a community with poor schooling. Disc 240. Mr. Rader recalls his support of public schooling in Virginia during Massive Resistance in order to sustain economic develop [...]
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
167.

Interview With George R. Ferguson October 25, 1985.

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Disc 240. Mr. Rader recalls his support of public schooling in Virginia during Massive Resistance in order to sustain economic development within the commonwealth. At 5:30, interview with George R. Ferguson begins. Mr. Ferguson recounts the lawsuit brought by the Charlottesville NAACP to desegregate schools immediately following the Brown v. Board of Education decision in 1954. Court proceedings continued into 1958, when the judge assigned several black children to attend otherwise white schools in Charlottesville. The commonwealth then closed schools in Charlottesville under the policy of Massive Resistance. Mr. Ferguson describes how the Boatwright committee of the Virginia General Assembly harassed Charlottesville NAACP members.
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
168.

Interview With Oliver W. Hill and Samuel Wilbert Tucker October 26, 1985.

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Disc 246. Civil rights attorneys Oliver Hill and S.W. Tucker discuss the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, including the meaning of "with all deliberate speed." They remark upon how long it took to desegregate schools. They comment on the policies of Senator Harry Byrd and President Dwight Eisenhower. Mr. Hill talks about his service in the military during World War II. Mr. Tucker also served, and he relates stories about how Jim Crow worked in the military. Discs 247 to 250. Mr. Tucker and Mr. Hill recount stories of life under Jim Crow, including experiences with seating on trains and other forms of transportation, service at restaurants, taking the bar exam, race riots, and trying to reserve a bridal suite on a honeymoon. They also tell the story of Dr. Charles Drew. Disc [...]
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
169.

North Philadelphia Locations October 25, 1985.

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Disc 264 and 265. Footage of North Philadelphia.
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)
170.

America in the 20th Century: The Sixties

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"In the 1960's, Americans embraced the liberal promises and programs of two presidents: John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Baines Johnson. Kennedy, the East Coast blue blood, and Johnson, the rough and tumble Texan, could not have been more different. Yet each embracedthe legacy of Franklin Roosevelt and sought to reshape his 'New Deal' into their own world vision. For Kennedy it was the 'New Fontier.' For Johnson, the 'Great Society.' Each had its triumphs and failures, but together they redefined the role of the federal government in American life and culture."--Original container.
Online
2009
171.

A More Perfect Union [electronic resource]: (1968-2013)

After 1968, African Americans set out to build a bright future on the foundation of the civil rights movement's victories, but a growing class disparity threatened to split the black community. As African Americans won political office across the country and the black middle class made progress, larger economic and political forces isolated the black urban poor. When Barack Obama was elected president in 2008, many hoped that America had finally transcended racism. By the time of his second victory, however, it was clear that many issues, including true racial equality, remain to be resolved?
Online
2014; 2013
172.

Mighty Times: The Children's March

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In May of 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. asked black people of Birmingham, Alabama to go to jail in the cause of racial equality. The adults were afraid to go to jail and so the school children marched and over 5000 of them were arrested. This lead President Kennedy to sponsor the 1964 Civil Rights Act which eventually to the march on Washington. Contains vintage film footage, re-stagings of some activities and interviews with some of the protesters.
DVD
2005
Law (Klaus Reading Room) Map
173.

Eyes on the Prize II [Videorecording]: America at the Racial Crossroads

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Offers a comprehensive reappraisal of the leaders and events that brought the civil rights movement from the South to the rest of the United States from 1965 through the 1980s.
Laserdisc
1993; 1990
Ivy (By Request)
174.

The Road to Brown: The Untold Story of "The Man Who Killed Jim Crow"

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The story of segregation and the brilliant legal campaign against it which helped to launch the Civil Rights movement. Also a moving and long- overdue tribute to a daring but little known Black lawyer, Charles Hamilton Houston - "the man who killed Jim Crow". Charles Houston, Dean of Howard University Law School, realized that an attack on the legal basis of segregated education would undermine Jim Crow. In a taut constitutional detective story, the video untangles the cases that led to the landmark 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education decision. Finally, the video revisits the "New South" of integrated schools and black elected officials. Though much has changed, America still has far to go along the road to equality and social justice.
VHS
1990
Law (Reserve Stacks) Map
175.

Interview With Alice Jackson Stuart December 7, 1987.

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Disc 259. Alice Jackson Stuart recounts her experiences as the first African American student to apply to the University of Virginia. When Donald Gaines Murray applied to University of Maryland School of Law, Ms. Stuart (who already had a bachelor's degree from Virginia Union University in 1933) spoke with family friend and Murray's lawyer Charles Hamilton Houston about helping to advance integration of higher education by provoking a legal case via her application to the University of Virginia graduate school of education. Disc 260. Ms. Stuart recalls different events that occurred during litigation of her case during 1935 and 1936. She explains that when the Virginia General Assembly passed a bill awarding scholarships and living expenses to minority students to attend out-of-state [...]
DVD
2006
Ivy (By Request)