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1.

Australia: The Flying Doctors

Australia, a country the size of a continent, is 14 times larger than France but has nearly three times fewer inhabitants. Given the great distances in the country, how can everybody receive medical care and treatment in the event of an emergency? Today, the flying doctor plays a leading role in Australia. Bernard Fontanille sets out to discover one of these organizations, Careflight. Bernard discovers the vast contrasts in Australia through farmers, surfers, and fishermen of the Sunshine Coast, and through rural hospitals that look as though they are part of a Western movie set. He attends training sessions, witnesses operations in the Bush, and shares a few very intense days with Mike the doctor, Paul the pilot, and Anthony the paramedic.
Online
2016; 2015
2.

Bolivia: The Kallawaya, Healer People

The Kallawaya, itinerant healers of the Andes, live in the mountains of Apolobamba. They are doctors, pharmacists, traders and gatherers, and know how to concoct remedies; the Kallawaya have an unequalled knowledge of Andean plants. In the village of Chajaya, emergency doctor Bernard Fontanille meets Mario Portugal who has in-depth knowledge of nearly 300 plant species. The men travel to the Antiplano to treat an ailing patient.
Online
2016; 2013
3.

Brazil: The Doctors of Xingu

Dr. Douglas Rodrigues created Projeto Xingu, a training course given by the Federal University of São Paulo to provide those in the field with the tools to understand Indian customs and beliefs. Emergency doctor Bernard Fontanille meets one of his former students, Vânia Rabelo. For three years, she has been living among the Kaiabis, in the Xingu river basin, gathering experiences linked to culture shock.
Online
2016; 2013
4.

Cambodia I: The Tônlé Sap Clinic

Not far from the temples of Angkor, the inhabitants of the Tonlé Sap Lake adapted their lifestyle to the vagaries of the waters. Floods and droughts occur as the Mekong River swells. Resting atop the water are a church, a police station, a Buddhist temple, and a medical team, which has been operating for four years. Emergency doctor Bernard Fontanille joins them for a medical round like no other.
Online
2016; 2013
5.

Cambodia II: The Last of the Kru

In villages on the high plains along the Vietnamese border in northwest Cambodia lives the Bunong ethnic group. Cambodian medicine, marked by the influence of doctrines borrowed from Buddhist, Ayurvedic, and Chinese medicines, varies according to the region. The Bunongs developed ancestral medicinal expertise based on plants that is practiced by secret caregivers, the Krus.
Online
2016; 2013
6.

Cameroon: The Pain Killing Tree

In late 2013, a Franco-Cameroonian team discovered a painkiller, which man has claimed to have invented, but exists in a natural state in a common African tree, the African peach. Bernard Fontanille travels to a village of the Tikar people. Traditional healer Gaston Amoa knows the African peach well, and calls it the "Ntwo'o." For the Tikars and their neighbors the Pygmies, the plant is critical and its numerous properties help them get through their day-to-day lives.
Online
2016; 2014
7.

Canada: Haida Gwaii, Island of the People

Bernard Fontanille travels to the archipelago of Haida Gwaii, located on the western point of Canada. Formerly known as the Queen Charlotte Islands, the territory acquired its new name in 2010, in reference to the people that have lived there for thousands of years. Despite their distance from the mainland, the Haida have not been spared by history. These "First Nation People" account for 4% of Canadians and face the challenge of reviving vast swathes of memory. This reconstruction of identity also includes medicine.
Online
2016; 2014
8.

Chile: The Mapuche Healers

The Mapuche are the largest native minority within the Chilean State, and account for 9% of the population. Mapuche communities can count on the Machis, healers that treat body and spirit. Bernard Fontanille travels to the region of Araucania to discover the ways in which traditional Mapuche medicine is practiced in relation to its traditions and environment, and the country's modern health system. With Rosa Barbosa, a Machi, he immerses himself in a medicine whose curative energy comes from the elements.
Online
2016; 2014
9.

China I: The Medical Arts of the Warrior Monks

The Shaolin monks are famous for Kung-Fu, but are equally respected in China for their teachings of traditional medicine, which combines knowledge of the body with medicinal plants and massages. A few old masters, the guardians of this ancestral knowledge, still live in the remote mountains of Shaolin. Bernard Fontanille embarks on a journey into a forgotten China and meets Master Xingzhen.
Online
2016; 2013
10.

China II: One-Hundred-Plant Medicine

In China, caregivers turn to nature as a source of healing remedies. Emergency doctor Bernard Fontanille travels to Baisha, in the province of Yunnan, to meet Doctor Ho. This reputed practitioner opened a clinic that attracts patients from all over China and the rest of the world.
Online
2016; 2013
11.

Iceland: Deep in the Polar Night

Located in close proximity to the Polar Circle, Iceland experiences extreme winters. Cold weather and darkness invade the daily lives of the 300,000 Icelanders, but the rates of Seasonal Affective Disorder are lower than those in the other countries on the same latitudes. Bernard Fontanille travels to the Island of Fire and Ice to understand how its inhabitants adapted to their extreme environment. Remedies include: hydrotherapy, light therapy, social connection, and the consumption of cod liver oil.
Online
2016; 2014
12.

India I: The Healers Warriors

Varma kalai, the art of vital points, is a Tamil martial arts discipline that draws on Siddha science and medicines. The particularity of the practice involves an in-depth knowledge of the vulnerable parts of the body, from the joints to the vital organs. In the village of Kovalam, emergency doctor Bernard Fontanille meets a master of this unique form of combat. Young disciples learn to detect and manipulate body parts for fighting and healing purposes. In India, varma kalai siddhars have a reputation for prolonging or ending life as they please.
Online
2016; 2013
13.

India II: The Angels of Maharashtra

Like everywhere in India, overpopulation and the caste system make access to care very difficult in the village of Jawalke. Recently, a few untouchable women who did not know how to read or write were trained in health care. Emergency doctor Bernard Fontanille follows one of these women on her daily rounds.
Online
2016; 2013
14.

Indonesia I: The Lontar Men

Along the coast of Rote Island, the southern-most tip of the Indonesian archipelago, a barrier of palm trees points skywards. These Lontars constitute the island's wealth. They are used for food, clothing, housing, recreation, and medicinal purposes. The island's two healers, Joseph and Jonas guide emergency doctor Bernard Fontanille as he discovers their unique therapeutic practice.
Online
2016; 2013
15.

Indonesia II: Bali - the Island of the Balians

In Bali, Bernard Fontanille meets Mangku Tambun, a guardian of the Gunung Agung- "House of the Gods." Tambun is one of the last Balinese to receive the title "Balian" (healer). This priest-doctor plays the role of intermediary between man and the Hindu gods.
Online
2016; 2013
16.

Japan: Okinawa's Last Hundred-Year-Olds

Bernard Fontanille travels to Okinawa, a Japanese island that cultivates the art of ageing via social bonds, physical activity, and personal fulfilment. He talks with 91-year-old Mrs. Toyama to understand the secrets of her longevity. For her, it is very important to have Ikigai: "the belief that life is worth living.
Online
2016; 2013
17.

Japan: Sumo Secrets

Sumo wrestlers have a proverb: "Wounds sustained on the dohyô (the ring) are cured on the dohyô." Sumo is a sport of self-sacrifice in which wrestlers learn to master their bodies; medicine occupies a highly ambivalent position in their world. Bernard Fontanille has permission to examine daily life in a "heya," a sumo training stable. He meets Inui Tomoyuki, a man who uses Chinese medicine and osteopathy to treat Sumos in a unique way.
Online
2016; 2015
18.

Kenya: Of Men and Volcanoes

Approximately two thirds of the daily calories the Massaï ingest come from animal fat, yet they have few health problems. The knowledge of the Massaï herbalists enables these nomadic tribes to take advantage of the surrounding nature.
Online
2016; 2013
19.

Ladakh: The Last Nomads

In 2002, Dr. Dekue established a Tibetan medical team for nomadic livestock farmers in the Ladakh region. The mobile clinic travels across the Changtang Plateau, treating the Drokpa with traditional forms of medicine; Dekey helps connect the nomads to their Tibetan culture. Emergency doctor Bernard Fontanille accompanies the team as they administer treatment at an altitude of over 5,000 meters.
Online
2016; 2013
20.

Madagascar: The Spirit of Plants

Madagascar's variety of climate and relief gives the "Red Island" one of the world's richest floras. The island's healers can identify hundreds of plants and contribute to scientific research. In the town of Anantsono, Bernard Fontanille meets Folo Boataky; she describes herself as a therapist. With help from the spirits of ancestors, Folo Boataky uses precious trees, her hands, and her mastery trance to heal.
Online
2016; 2014