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Wild West Tech
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1.

Biggest Machines in the West

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Online
2004
2.

Civil War in the West

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Online
2005
3.

Law & Order Tech

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Online
2005
4.

Native American Tech

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"Examines the lives of leaders including Geronimo, Crazy Horse, Red Cloud and Sitting Bull. Describes the decimation of Custer's 7th Cavalry at Little Big Horn and the Cheyenne sacking of Julesburg. Explore how medicine men and surgeons tended to the tribes and their warriors."--Catalog description.
Online
2004
5.

Alamo Tech

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Online
2004
6.

Shootout Tech

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Online
2005
7.

Cowboy Tech

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Online
2004
8.

Brothel Tech

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Online
2004
9.

Hunting Tech

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Online
2004
10.

Military Tech

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Describes how the 7th Calvary came to the aid of settlers in the West who came under attack by the Native Americans, and how they were able to win the battles with the Native Americans with better weapons, strategy, and tactics.
Online
2004
11.

Western Towns

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Period photos, first-person accounts, and visits to surviving ghost towns offer a window into the world of the Old West.
Online
2008; 2004
12.

Disaster Tech

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See how man's folly, pride, and stupidity led to some of the Wild West's worst catastrophes.
Online
2008; 2004
13.

Revenge Tech

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"It's said revenge is a dish best served cold, but in the Wild West, it was also ladled out with surprising invention and cruelty. From a liver-eating madman bent on avenging the death of a loved one to a teenage girl who switched her gender to exact vengeance on her husband's murderer, technology made a uniquely brutal form of frontier justice possible"--The History Channel website.
Online
2005
14.

Massacres II

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Heavily armed, surrounded by a vast and unknown wilderness, and subject to attack from the people who had lived there for centuries, Western settlers often found themselves fighting for their lives ... examines four of the most brutal such episodes: the Camp Grant Massacre in Tucson, Arizona in April 1871, when 140 Apache men, women and children were slain in their sleep; the 1836 Goliad Massacre in Texas, when Mexican soldiers killed over 300 Texans; the Council House Massacre in San Antonio, where Comanches succumbed to a deadly volley of gunfire; and the Dragoon Springs Massacre in 1858 which saw stage company workers killed for unknown reasons.
Online
2005
15.

Grim Reaper

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"Examines how settlers met their deaths. Technology, in particular, played a hand. The reaper, for example, was responsible for the passing of many. As it sped up harvesting, it increased the speed at which farm workers were maimed--or worse. Then there were trains, wild animals, and "friendly" innkeepers, who in the end, weren't so nice"--The History Channel website.
Online
2005
16.

Saloons

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Belly up to the bar for a shot of rough-and-tumble history as we reawaken the spirit of the Old West's one stop shops of sin.
Online
2005
17.

Train Tech

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Explores the history of railroads and trains in the western United States.
Online
2004
18.

Execution Tech

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Host Keith Carradine describes the methods of executing criminals on the frontier. Discusses the 6 man gallows built at the Fort Smith courthouse, the proper way to tie a hangman's knot and the "drop distance table" for effective hanging. The "twitchup" gallows, the infamous El Paso "double header" with two men hung on one rope, the Julian gallows which worked without a hangman, as well as firing squads and the automatic "execution machine" are covered. Also described is the first electrocution by electric chair.
Online
2004
19.

Deadwood Tech

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Stroll down the main street of the legendary gold-rush town and relive some of its infamous incidents.
Online
2004
20.

Road West

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"During the 1800s, the road west was a dangerous path into the unknown. As pioneers headed toward a new life, they faced unpredictable weather, uneven trails, and sometimes unforgiving Native Americans. Remarkable feats of engineering, such as blasting mile-long tunnels or building a bridge to span 300 feet across a mighty river, helped tame the frontier. Host David Carradine discovers the amazing advances made by settlers and the technology they used to help them on their journey into the vast wilderness."--A & E website.
Online
2005