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Vietnam : A Television History
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81.

Interview With Ray Snyder, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Vietnam veteran Col. Ray Snyder recalls August 1965 where he was stationed around Da Nang air base complex. He discusses protecting the airfield and the associated cantonment. Snyder also talks about helping with the reconstruction after the surrounding region had been attacked previously. Snyder discusses being well received by the Vietnamese civilians during the reconstruction. Snyder also discusses the mood of his men while working in the villages and how they helped civilians with such tasks as harvesting rice and obtaining food and school supplies.
Online
1983
82.

Interview With Raymond K. (Raymond Kissam) Price, 1982 [electronic resource]

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Raymond K. Price, Jr. was an assistant to and speechwriter for President Nixon. He speaks about the 1968 campaign, focusing primarily on Hubert Humphrey and the role that Vietnam played in Nixon's victory. He details Nixon's reaction to the demonstrations and the administration's strategy for dealing with public opinion while taking a hard line approach to North Vietnam. Mr. Price concludes with commentary about the abolishment of the draft system and the effects of the Watergate scandal on the outcomes of the Vietnam War.
Online
1983
83.

Interview With Richard C. Holbrooke [2], 1982 [electronic resource]

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Between 1963-1966 Richard Holbrooke completed diplomatic service first as a provincial representative for the Agency for International Development (AID), then as Staff Assistant to Ambassadors Maxwell Taylor and Henry Cabot Lodge. Holbrooke talks about his work in Vietnam, the assessments he had to complete and how the information he gathered while on the ground in Vietnam differed from that which we received from the United States Government. He refers to this as the "Credibility Gap;" the making of decisions by the US Government on incorrect information. Holbrooke also states that the most tragic mistake made by the United States Government was that it could "bleed an Asian communist enemy into the point of fading away." He then begins to recall when his perceptions about Vietnam b [...]
Online
1983
84.

Interview With Richard M. Moose, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Richard Moose was on the staff of the United States Senate Foreign Relations Committee from 1969 - 1975. He describes his mission in Vietnam after the ceasefire in 1974 to assess the situation of how the South Vietnamese were positioned in terms of military equipment provided by the Americans and the possibilities of South Vietnam's survival. He mentions that the strategies in Vietnam and Cambodia were doomed to failure and that by the 1970s it was clear that the end was near. Mr. Moose details his report that led to the evacuation of Saigon, and reflects upon the meanings of the Vietnam War.
Online
1983
85.

Interview With Robinson Risner, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Robinson Risner was an Air Force pilot who was shot down over North Vietnam and captured by the North Vietnamese. He was held for over seven years and was repeatedly tortured. He relates his story of being shot down and captured by the North Vietnamese, and then the ordeal of his imprisonment and torture in the "Hanoi Hilton" prison camp. General Risner recalls his feelings during the "Christmas Bombing" and upon hearing of the peace negotiations, and toward the anti-war protesters in the United States.
Online
1983
86.

Interview With Roger Hilsman, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Roger Hilsman worked in the Kennedy Administration, first as director of the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research and then as the Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs. He was criticized for drafting a cable on behalf of President Kennedy to the American Ambassador to South Vietnam instructing the Ambassador to give direct support to the opponents of President Ngo Dinh Diem. He describes the Kennedy White House as youthful and confident but shaken when Soviet Premier Khrushchev announced his support for insurgencies around the world. He says this announcement paved the way for the US counterinsurgency operations in Vietnam. Hilsman says he tried to convince Kennedy that the way to fight guerillas was with guerillas themselves. He also recounts Kennedy [...]
Online
1983
87.

Interview With Scott Camil, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Scott Camil served in Vietnam from 1965 to 1967. He describes his own negativity towards the Vietnamese during his tour, and the camaraderie among his group of Marines. He recounts in detail his first battle and his involvement in search and destroy missions during "Operation Stone" in 1967. Camil discusses the mood of American soldiers during the war and how it may have fed certain atrocities committed against Vietnamese civilians. Camil would later become an anti-war activist. He describes his personal transformation and his anger towards the US government upon his return from Vietnam.
Online
1983
88.

Interview With Thich Minh Chau, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Thich Minh Chau discusses the history of Buddhism in Vietnam. He describes the effect of numerous colonizations and divisions of Vietnam on Vietnamese Buddhism, and specifically comments on the damaging effects of American culture.
Online
1983
89.

Interview With Thomas H. Moorer, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Thomas H. Moorer was an Admiral in the United States Navy. During the Vietnam War, he was the Chief of Naval Operations from 1967 - 1970, and served as the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 1970 - 1974. Admiral Moorer begins by talking about the events surrounding the Tonkin Gulf Incidents, and his belief that there was in fact two separate incidents. He then discusses the incursions into Cambodia to search for the COSVN headquarters, and the debate within the Defense Department over whether or not the US should push into Cambodia. He also briefly describes the failed attempt to destroy the Ho Chi Minh Trail in Laos, the 1972 Spring Offensive, and the decision to mine Hai Phong harbor, despite worries of drawing the Soviets into the war. Admiral Moorer then details the 1972 [...]
Online
1983
90.

Interview With Tom Lyons [electronic resource]

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Tom Lyons joined the Marines in 1967 shortly after graduating high school in Boston. Lyons recalls there was a tradition of joining the armed forces in his area of town and that at that time the anti-war movement had yet to reach its peak. Lyons discusses that he was not too concerned about draft dodgers as he was just looking out for himself. While in Vietnam four of his childhood friends were killed. Lyon describes his feelings about his friends' death and how their absence did not hit him until after he came home from Vietnam. Lyons also talks about building a memorial for the fallen in his hometown of South Boston so that the families would have a place to gather and the soldiers would not be forgotten.
Online
1983
91.

Interview With Ton-That Thien, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Dr. Ton-That Thien served under Bao Dai and Ngo Dinh Diem. Here he describes his 1968 capture and interrogation by Communist forces, and his escape during the Battle of Hue with the help of American marines. He discusses the role of the American press in Vietnam and recalls a clash of opinion with Madame Nhu.
Online
1983
92.

Interview With U. Alexis (Ural Alexis) Johnson, 1982 [electronic resource]

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Deputy Ambassador to the Republic of Vietnam, Alexis Johnson recalls the 1954 Geneva Conference when the French were pressuring the United States to send additional assistance to their battle in Vietnam in the form of air raids. Johnson recalls trying to form a pact with the other countries at the Conference regarding collective action against communist aggression in Vietnam. Johnson recalls the US view of the Vietnamese conflict as a fluid one in which the French were the major players. Johnson relates the eventual agreement between the French and the Viet Minh to draw a line at the seventeenth parallel, dividing Vietnam into north and south sections. The United States, while not fully satisfied with the agreement, decided to uphold it and avoid the use of force to upset it.
Online
1983
93.

Interview With W. Averell (William Averell) Harriman, 1979 [electronic resource]

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Averrell Harriman was a long-serving U.S. ambassador who acted as the chief U.S. negotiator of the Paris Peace Accord. Harriman discusses the seeds of U.S. policy toward Indochina following World War Two, with Roosevelt and Stalin being in agreement that it would be best if the French did not return there. He expresses his displeasure that France was using Marshall Fund money to support its military in Vietnam. He describes U.S. presidents' different stances toward Vietnam and his experience at the Paris Peace Accord negotiations. He goes into great detail accounting for the various reasons for the U.S. being in Vietnam, including the two countries' postures toward the Soviet Union and China. He offers his impressions of Diem and other Vietnamese leaders.
Online
1983
94.

Interview With W.W. (Walt Whitman) Rostow, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Walt Rostow served as Special Assistant for National Security Affairs for Presidents Kennedy and Johnson. In this capacity, he played a significant role in shaping U.S. policy in Southeast Asia. He discusses his optimism for the war through 1967, and even more so after the Tet Offensive. Mr. Rostow describes the positions of fellow administration insiders such as Clark Clifford, Dean Rusk, and the Wise Men. He reflects on Lyndon Johnson's decision not to seek reelection, and the decisions to pursue peace talks and to halt bombings in Vietnam. He gives his opinions of what ultimately went wrong in Vietnam, and the impact that the Vietnam War has had on the United States.
Online
1983
95.

Interview With Wayne Smith, 1982 [electronic resource]

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Wayne Smith was a combat medic during Vietnam. Smith recalls his Cambodian operations that consisted of search and destroy missions. He discusses his role as a medic, to be as quick as possible to get to the wounded and make sure that they were evacuated. He talks about the waning public support during his time in Vietnam and the morale of the troops in Cambodia. Smith also recalls the news of the pullout in 1970 and how that affected the ongoing military operations.
Online
1983
96.

Interview With William C. (William Childs) Westmoreland, 1981 [electronic resource]

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General William C. Westmoreland directed the American military presence on the ground in Vietnam from 1964 to 1968. Here he discusses the situation in Vietnam in 1964 and various events during the War, including the Marine landing at Da Nang in 1965, Operation Rolling Thunder, and the Tet Offensive. He describes the successes and failures of American military efforts in Vietnam and the strengths of various units. Finally, he reflects on the Johnson Administration's 1968 decision not to pursue a war-winning strategy.
Online
1983
97.

Interview With William E. Le Gro, 1981 [electronic resource]

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William E. Le Gro was a colonel in Vietnam and author of "Vietnam from Cease-Fire to Capitulation." Le Gro reports that he felt the Paris Peace Accord was doomed from the start, at least in terms of maintaining a cease fire, but that its purpose for the United States - to disengage the US from Vietnam and to ensure the return of American prisoners of war - was a success. Le Gro says the United States did not back up its Paris promises to assist South Vietnam in the event of an incursion by the North. Despite the indication of its bombing of Cambodia, the US did not promise military action in good faith. He cites the US drawdown in materiel support to Vietnam as a cause of the South's fall but disputes the role corruption among officials played, dismissing it as an easy excuse some Am [...]
Online
1983
98.

Interview With William Egan Colby, 1981 [electronic resource]

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William Colby was a high-ranking CIA officer during the Vietnam War. He would later direct the Agency. Here he recalls the CIA's assessment of the Vietnam War in 1965 and the failure of the US to anticipate the Tet Offensive. He discusses the Phoenix Program, which he directed, describing its impact on the War. Finally, he recounts events surrounding the Fall of Saigon and the end of the War, and reflects on the success or failure of US strategy in Vietnam.
Online
1983
99.

Interview With William H. (William Healy) Sullivan, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Former Ambassador William H. Sullivan recounts the negotiations leading up to the Paris Peace Accords. He recalls discovering secret talks between Henry Kissinger and Lê Đúc Thọ and discusses the strategy and points of contention during the peace talks. Finally, he recalls the decision to notify President Nixon that the negotiations were stalling, and he compares the peace process in Vietnam with that of Laos.
Online
1983
100.

Interview With William P. Bundy, 1981 [electronic resource]

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William Bundy, brother of McGeorge Bundy, served in the CIA and later as an Assistant Secretary of State under Lyndon Johnson. He recalls Johnson's early actions towards the South Vietnamese government and his hesitancy to bomb North Vietnam in 1964. Bundy reviews the Tonkin Gulf Incident and the administration's resulting actions. In addition, he discusses Johnson's overall strategies in Vietnam and comments on his character as President.
Online
1983