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Vietnam : A Television History
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Nonfiction Television Programs
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81.

Interview With Frederick Nolting, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Frederick Nolting was Ambassador to South Vietnam from 1961 -- 1963. Appointed by President Kennedy, he became closely associated with Ngo Dinh Diem. As the United States sought to distance itself from Diem, Nolting was replaced by Henry Cabot Lodge. Mr. Nolting describes the early days of his assignment, including the visit from Vice-President Johnson and the Taylor-Rostow mission. He defends Diem from some of the criticisms that were made of him, and offers opinions of Ngo Dinh Nhu and his wife, Madame Nhu. Mr. Nolting then recalls the debates in the United States regarding Diem, and his own view that the support for Diem should continue.
Online
1983
82.

Interview With Jack Keegan, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Father Jack Keegan was a classmate of Ngo Dinh Diem's at the Maryknoll Seminary. He recalls Diem as someone not of great importance, but rather as simply another student. He describes Diem as having a Chaplinesque walk and being very enigmatic. Keegan remembers that Diem was fluent in French yet spoke stilted English. Diem, according to Father Keegan, was very studious, taking his Catholic studies seriously.
Online
1983
83.

Interview With Henry Cabot Lodge, 1979 [electronic resource]

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Henry Cabot Lodge was a United States Senator from Massachusetts, and Ambassador to South Vietnam from 1963 -1964. He viewed South Vietnam's president Ngo Dinh Diem as an ineffective leader, and tacitly supported the coup that overthrew him. Mr. Lodge discusses the circumstances of his appointment as Ambassador, and his impressions of Vietnam prior to going. He recounts the advice and instruction he received from other advisers, especially regarding Diem, and details his role in the events surrounding the coup. He describes Diem's personality and his own view of the war after the coup.
Online
1983
84.

Interview With Lucien Conein, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Lucien Conein was an OSS officer in Vietnam in the early 1960s. He recalls the events leading up to the coup d'etat on November, 1963, which resulted in the overthrow of Ngo Dinh Diem's government. Conein reported plans of the coup to Ambassador Lodge and recalls the US government made it clear to the planners, ahead of time, that the US would neither support nor thwart Diem's overthrow.
Online
1983
85.

Interview With Lucien Bodard, 1981 [electronic resource]

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French reporter and writer Lucien Bodard recalls life in Saigon during 1954 and the rise of the Binh Xuyen, the Vietnamese paramilitary crime organization. Bodard also discusses the relationship between the United States and France and their relationships with the culture and people of Vietnam.
Online
1983
86.

Interview With Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu, 1982 [electronic resource]

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As the sister-in-law of President Diem, Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu was considered the first lady of South Vietnam in the late 1950s through the early 1960s. Here she argues that the Diem government was the only legitimate government in South Vietnam, that they were undermined by the United States and that the United States, therefore, paid a price. She discusses the Buddhist Crisis of 1963 and the results of the Paris Peace Accords. She reflects on Ngo Dinh Nhu and President Diem's characters and her own reputation as the "Dragon Lady" of Vietnam. Finally, she describes the diplomatic efforts of Ngo Dinh Nhu towards North Vietnam and the arrogance of the United States in intervening.
Online
1983
87.

Interview With Thich Minh Chau, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Thich Minh Chau discusses the history of Buddhism in Vietnam. He describes the effect of numerous colonizations and divisions of Vietnam on Vietnamese Buddhism, and specifically comments on the damaging effects of American culture.
Online
1983
88.

Interview With Nguyen Cao Ky, 1981 [electronic resource]

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Nguyen Cao Ky served as Prime Minister of South Vietnam from 1965 until 1967 and then Vice President unti 1971. Nguyen Cao Ky recalls wanting to move the war north as a way to stop the Communists from infilitrating South Vietnam. As much as Nguyen Cao Ky wanted to see a unified Vietnam, he knew that was not possible and that the higher priority was to stop the spread of communism. Nguyen Cao Ky also talks about the Buddhist unrest in 1964 and his arrangement for the departure of Nguyen Khnah.
Online
1983
89.

Interview With Pham Duy, 1982 [electronic resource]

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Pham Duy is a Vietnamese musician who fought in the Viet Minh against the French, but later became disenchanted with Communism and left Vietnam to live in the United States. He briefly describes the hardships under French rule, and why he was moved to write songs for the resistance. He sings some of his more famous songs, and explains the lyrical meanings contained in them. He finally explains why he could not support the Communists despite his association with the Viet Minh.
Online
1983
90.

Interview With Elbridge Durbrow, 1979 [electronic resource]

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United States Ambassador to South Vietnam from 1957 to 1961, Elbridge Durbrow describes his first impressions of Saigon, comparing it to a southern French provincial town. Durbrow talks about his first meeting with Ngo Dinh Diem and the differences in personality between Diem and his brother Nhu. Durbrow supported the idea that the US should stand behind Diem and continues on to describe the 1960 attempted coup against Diem. Durbrow also recalls the role the Chinese played in the Vietnam conflict and the lessons learned from Vietnam.
Online
1983