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1.

Baseball: First Inning Our Game [electronic resource]

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Tells the story of the origins of the game as a barehanded game played by men and boys in cities, usually in the vicinity of a saloon. Meet the first baseball magnate Albert Goodwill Spalding, explore the game's first gambling scandal, and see the attempts by women to play the game in the 1860s.
Online
2005; 1994
2.

Baseball: Second Inning Something Like a War [electronic resource]

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Major league baseball enters the twentieth century in trouble, beset by declining attendance, rowdyism, unhappy players, and feuding, greedy club owners. Then it divides itself in two and succeeds beyond anyone's wildest dreams. Early giants of the game who are featured in this episode include Christy Mathewson, a college educated pitcher, known to schoolchildren as "the Christian Gentleman," and John McGraw, the manager of the New York Giants.
Online
2005; 1994
3.

Baseball: Third Inning the Faith of Fifty Million People [electronic resource]

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In 1910, William Howard Taft becomes the first president ever to attend opening day. As players from small-town America and immigrant men from the mines and factories fill the rosters of the teams, baseball moves into bright new stadiums in Boston and Brooklyn. Featured in this episode is the memorable 1912 World Series in which Fred Snodgrass' field error gave the championship to the Red Sox and the rise of the upstart Federal League.
Online
2005; 1994
4.

Baseball: Fourth Inning a National Heirloom [electronic resource]

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The early twenties see baseball transformed into a game of power hitters. None was more important to baseball and American life than Babe Ruth, the turbulent son of a Baltimore saloon keeper. In 1921, radio station KDKA in Pittsburgh broadcasts the first major league game. Pitcher Andrew "Rube" Foster forms the Negro National League, whose eight teams, by 1923, draw over 400,000 black fans.
Online
2005; 1994
5.

Baseball: Fifth Inning Shadow Ball [electronic resource]

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As baseball struggles through the Depression, owners struggle to adapt, introducing night baseball, the first All-Star game and the Hall of Fame to help fill their stadiums, but nothing seems to work. In one of the most hotly debated moments in baseball history, Babe Ruth, at the plate in the 1932 World Series, waves his arm and then hits a homer, seemingly in the direction he pointed. Negro leagues thrive in the shadlow of the all-white major leagues, like a parallel world filled with gifted athletes like Josh Gibson, "Cool Papa" Bell and Satchel Paige.
Online
2005; 1994
6.

Baseball: Sixth Inning National Pastime [electronic resource]

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This episode focuses on the season of 1941, one of the most exciting of all time, when Joe DiMaggio hit in 56 straight games (the longest streak before or since), Ted Williams became the last man to bat .400, and the Brooklyn Dodgers won their first pendant in 20 years. Then World War II intervenes and baseball's best players become soldiers.
Online
2005; 1994
7.

Baseball: Seventh Inning the Capital of Baseball [electronic resource]

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Focuses on the glorious heyday of New York City baseball, where for 10 straight years, a local team always played in the World Series and almost always won. Rare newsreel footage and interviews illuminate some of baseball's most memorable moments, including the "shot heard round the world," Bobby Thomson's home run off Ralph Branca in 1951, Willie Mays' incredible catch in the 1954 World Series and the switch-hitting slugger Mickey Mantle.
Online
2005; 1994
8.

Baseball: Eighth Inning a Whole New Ballgame [electronic resource]

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Signaling the beginning of the end of New York Yankee's dynasty, Pittsburgh's Bill Mazeroski wins the 1960 World Series with a home run in the last inning of the last game. In the following season, Roger Maris breaks Babe Ruth's record by hitting 61 home runs. Sandy Koufax, the shy untouchable pitcher, dominates most of the decade, and Casey Stengel manages the New York Mets, a motley mix of veterans and newcomers renowned for their ineptitude. The worse they play, the better New York fans seem to like them.
Online
2005; 1994
9.

Baseball: Ninth Inning Home [electronic resource]

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By 1970, the national pastime is in trouble in spite of great performances by Brooks Robinson, Roberto Clemente, and Hank Aaron, who breaks Babe Ruth's lifetime record of 714 home runs. Attendance figures lag in ball parks across the country, but game six of the 1975 World Series -- thought by many to be the greatest game every played -- reawakens a whole country's love for the game.
Online
2005; 1994