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41.

John Brown's Holy War [electronic resource]

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John Brown, considered the father of American terrorism, was an inspiration to the Civil Rights movement. He was a farmer, a warrior, a family man and an avenging angel. More than 150 years after his execution, questions swirl around John Brown: was he a madman or a martyr? A bloodthirsty fanatic or a great American hero? Dramatic reenactments trace John Brown's obsessive battle against human bondage.
Online
2005; 2000
42.

Jimmy Carter: Part 2 Hostage [electronic resource]

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Examines the life and political career of President Jimmy Carter. Part 1 covers his life to his election to the presidency. Part 2 covers the subsequent years, including his presidency, the Iran hostage crisis, post-presidential years, and winning the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002.
Online
2005; 2002
43.

The Johnstown Flood [electronic resource]

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Examines the 1889 flood in western Pennsylvania that resulted in more than 2000 deaths. Explores the cause of the flood, a faulty dam constructed to provide a resort area for the wealthy residents of Pittsburg; the lives of people at the resort in the mountain; and the people who lived in Johnstown.
Online
2005; 1991
44.

Journey to America [electronic resource]

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Documentary using archival photographs and films, made as a tribute to the over 12 million people who journeyed to the U.S. from their homelands through Ellis Island between 1890 and 1920.
Online
2005; 1989
45.
LBJ

LBJ: Part 1 Beautiful Texas [electronic resource]

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Lyndon Baines Johnson was a poor boy from the Texas hill country who ascended to the pinnacle of world power as the 36th president of the United States. LBJ's career started in 1938 when he was elected a congressman, one of the youngest ever. He was elected to the Senate in 1948 under a cloud of suspicion. LBJ won by only 87 votes. In 1954, when the Democrats took over the Senate, LBJ became the youngest majority leader ever at age 46. In 1957, LBJ engineered passage of the first civil rights bill since Reconstruction--but the bill had too many compromises and no teeth. By 1960, LBJ felt he was ready for the presidency, but John Kennedy got there first--and then picked LBJ as his vice president. Hear how LBJ's career got started from the people who were there: John Connally, Bobby Ba [...]
Online
2005; 1991
46.
LBJ

LBJ: Part 2 My Fellow Americans [electronic resource]

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After JFK's assassination, LBJ first calmed the country, then he threw the power of the presidency behind a civil rights bill. As LBJ said, "I'm going to be the president who finishes what Lincoln began." With some old-fashioned arm twisting, LBJ hammered the 1964 Civil Rights Act through Congress. Next he launched the War on Poverty. He envisioned a "Great Society" for all Americans. LBJ was determined to be the greatest president ever. Vietnam would prove to be his undoing. By the time LBJ took office, Truman, Eisenhower, and JFK had all sent advisors to Vietnam. LBJ was not about to look soft on Communism. In August 1964, he rammed the Gulf of Tonkin resolution through Congress. After his landslide victory over Goldwater in November 1964, LBJ felt on top of the world, but it was a [...]
Online
2005; 1991
47.
LBJ

LBJ: Part 3 We Shall Overcome [electronic resource]

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After the triumph of the 1964 election, LBJ felt there was no problem the U.S. couldn't solve. New programs and agencies were created: Head Start, Urban Renewal, Public Television, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was passed. In March 1965, the first U.S. troops were sent to Vietnam. Only George Ball challenged the conventional wisdom. By July 1965, LBJ had escalated the number of troops from 75,000 to 125,000. The growing quagmire in Vietnam was changing LBJ's presidency.
Online
2005; 1991
48.
LBJ

LBJ: Part 4 the Last Believer [electronic resource]

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At his daughter's wedding in 1966, LBJ was the proud papa. But in 1966 and 1967 race riots in Watts, Detroit, and elsewhere shook the country. In Detroit, 43 people died and 7,000 were arrested. LBJ's Great Society was coming unraveled. Vietnam would do it in. By the end of 1967, a sense of siege came over the White House. The 1968 Tet offensive shattered the illusion of any progress in Vietnam. CBS anchor Walter Cronkite came out against the war. By March 1968, 500,000 American troops were in Vietnam. Bobby Kennedy announced he would run for president. On March 31, 1968, LBJ made the announcement that shocked the country--he would not run for another term.
Online
2005; 1991
49.

MacArthur: Part 1 Destiny [electronic resource]

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No soldier has ever captured the American imagination like Douglas MacArthur. He led Americans into battle for a half-century, through glorious victories and soul-numbing defeats. Courageous and supremely egotistical, he battled anyone who dared question his military judgment, even the President of the United States.
Online
2005; 1999
50.

MacArthur: Part 2 the Politics of War [electronic resource]

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No soldier has ever captured the American imagination like Douglas MacArthur. He led Americans into battle for a half-century, through glorious victories and soul-numbing defeats. Courageous and supremely egotistical, he battled anyone who dared question his military judgment, even the President of the United States.
Online
2005; 1999
51.

Marcus Garvey [electronic resource]: Look for Me in the Whirlwind

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Uses a wealth of archival film, photographs and documents to uncover the story of this Jamaican immigrant who between 1916 and 1921 built the largest black mass movement in world history.
Online
2005; 2001
52.

Mount Rushmore [electronic resource]

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Chronicles the story of the massive public works project, which took place in the midst of an economic depression, and relates the story of dozens of ordinary Americans who suddenly found themselves suspended high on a cliff face with drills and hammers, and examines the hyperactive, temperamental Danish artist whose talent and determination propelled the project.
Online
2005; 2002
53.

Meltdown at Three Mile Island [electronic resource]

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Discusses the events of March 28, 1979, when a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, overheated. Employs news footage and first-person interviews in relating the efforts made to avoid a catastrophic meltdown.
Online
2005; 1999
54.

One Woman, One Vote [electronic resource]

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Documents the 70-year struggle for women's suffrage which culminated in the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. It illuminates the alliances, infighting, betrayals and defeats that paved the way for victory in the battle for women's right to vote. Historical footage is enhanced with vocal performances, and interviews with historians provide the viewer with both current and historical perspectives.
Online
2005; 1995
55.

The Murder of Emmett Till [electronic resource]

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The shameful, sadistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Although Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and proceeded to sell their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began.
Online
2005; 2003
56.

The Orphan Trains [electronic resource]

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An examination of the results of the work of the Children's Aid Society in New York. From from 1853 to 1929, the Society sent over 100,000 homeless and orphaned children from the city to homes in rural America.
Online
2005; 1995
57.

Public Enemy #1 [electronic resource]

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Chronicles the life of John Dillinger, from his first youthful brush with the law to his death a decade later in a hail of bullets. It explores how, at a time of great hardship, Americans felt more admiration for a daring criminal than their seemingly ineffectual institutions of government.
Online
2005; 2002
58.

Race for the Superbomb: Part 1 [electronic resource]

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At the end of World War II the United States is the sole nation with the atomic bomb. The Soviet Union, seeing the bomb as a threat to their national safety, develop an atomic program of their own. Tensions between the U.S. and Soviet Union increase as Russia blocks road and rail access to Berlin. The Strategic Air Command is formed as a means of fighting a nuclear air war with Russia. Fearing the Soviets may develop an H-bomb before the U.S., President Truman reluctantly approves development of the super bomb. Russia responds in kind. After nearly three years of theoretical problem solving, the U.S. explodes its first thermonuclear device in the fall of 1952--an explosion with 800 times the power of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan
Online
2005; 1999
59.

Race for the Superbomb: Part 2 [electronic resource]

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In the political struggles following Stalin's death in 1953, Nikita Khrushchev takes over the leadership of the Soviet Union. The Soviets test their first H-bomb, but it is much less powerful than the U.S. version. Newly elected U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower implements nuclear deterrence as the primary strategy for the nuclear age. Criticism of the government's nuclear plans create rifts in the American nuclear scientific community. First the U.S. and then the Soviets develop new, much more powerful H-bombs, causing the scientists, military, political leaders and ultimately their nation's citizens to understand the futility of a global nuclear war. However, the strategy of building a strong nuclear deterrence causes both nations to embark on a nuclear arms escalation whose effects [...]
Online
2005; 1999
60.

Reconstruction: The Second Civil War: Part 2 Retreat [electronic resource]

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Reconstruction was fitfully under way in 1867. The Radical Republican plan had just been implemented. New state constitutions were drafted, black freedmen voted in and were elected to southern legislatures, and white southerners struggled to regain control of their land in the new South. Southerners who initially accepted Northerners in their region now looked on them with suspicion and coined the term "carpetbagger" to describe them. The 1868 Presidential Election was a referendum on Reconstruction. Though many agreed with the Democrats openly-white supremacist platform, more were soothed by the "Let Us Have Peace" theme of Ulysses S. Grant's campaign.
Online
2005; 2004