You searched for:

Series
:
VIVA PBS Streaming Video Collection
x
Source
:
Library Catalog
x
Genre
:
Music/Musical
x
25 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Broadway, the American Musical: Part 2 Syncopated City (1919-1933) [electronic resource]

Loading...
Gossip columnist Walter Winchell gave Broadway a nickname that becomes synonymous with all of New York: "It is the Big Apple, the goal of all ambitions, the pot of gold at the end of a drab and somewhat colorless rainbow." With the advent of Prohibition and the Jazz Age, America convulsed with energy and change, and nowhere was the riotous mix of classes and cultures more dramatically on display than Broadway. "There was this period in which everybody was leaping across borders and boundaries," says director/producer George C. Wolfe. "There was this incredible cross-fertilization, cultural appropriation." While brash American women flapped their way to newfound freedoms, heroines of Broadway like Marilyn Miller became a testament to pluck and luck. It was the age of "Whoopee" and the [...]
Online
2005; 2004
2.

Broadway, the American Musical: Part 1 Give My Regards to Broadway (1893-1927) [electronic resource]

Loading...
When Florenz Ziegfeld Jr. first hit New York in 1893, the intersection of Broadway and 42nd was nobody's idea of "the crossroads of the world." But by 1913, "'The Ziegfeld Follies' really were an amalgamation of everything that was happening in America, in New York, at that time," says writer Philip Furia. "Flo Ziegfeld was like the Broadway equivalent of the melting pot itself." Ziegfeld's story introduces many of the era's key figures: Irving Berlin, a Russian immigrant who became the voice of assimilated America; entertainers like Jewish comedienne Fanny Brice and African American Bert Williams, who became America's first "crossover" artists; and the brash Irish American George M. Cohan, whose song-and-dance routines embodied the energy of Broadway. This is also the story of the o [...]
Online
2005; 2004
3.

Broadway, the American Musical: Part 3 I Got Plenty of Nuttin' (1929-1942) [electronic resource]

Loading...
The Great Depression proved to be a dynamic period of creative growth on Broadway, and a dichotomy in the musical theater emerged. Productions like Cole Porter's "Anything Goes" offered glamour and high times as an escape, while others -- such as "Of Thee I Sing," which satirized the American political system, and the remarkable WPA production of "The Cradle Will Rock," about a steel strike -- dealt directly with the era's social and political concerns. When Bing Crosby recorded "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime," the doleful Broadway ballad took the hit parade by surprise.
Online
2005; 2004
4.

Broadway, the American Musical: Part 5 Tradition (1957-1979) [electronic resource]

Loading...
West Side Story" not only brought untraditional subject matter to the musical stage, it ushered in a new breed of director/choreographer who insisted on performers who could dance, sing and act. But by the time Jerome Robbins' last original musical, "Fiddler on the Roof," closed after a record run of 3,242 performances in 1972, the world of Broadway had changed forever. Rock 'n' roll, civil rights, and the Vietnam War ushered in new talents, many trained by the retiring masters, taking musical theater in daring new directions with innovative productions like "Hair," the first Broadway musical with an entire score of rock music.
Online
2005; 2004
5.

Broadway, the American Musical: Part 4 Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin' (1943-1960) [electronic resource]

Loading...
The new partnership of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II changed the face of Broadway forever, beginning with the record-breaking "Oklahoma!" in 1943, featuring a landmark ballet by Agnes de Mille. "Carousel" and "South Pacific" then set the standard for decades to come by pioneering a musical where story is all-important. For challenging the country to confront its deep-seated racial bigotry, "South Pacific" won the Pulitzer Prize. In "On the Town," an exuberant team of novices -- Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden, Adolph Green, and Jerome Robbins -- captured the energy, humor, and pathos of New York City during World War II. Irving Berlin triumphed again with "Annie Get Your Gun," featuring Ethel Merman and the unofficial anthem of the American musical theater, "There's No Bus [...]
Online
2005; 2004
6.

Broadway, the American Musical: Part 6 Putting It Together (1980-Present) [electronic resource]

Loading...
Legendary as the "Abominable Showman," notorious producer David Merrick reconquered Broadway in 1980 with a smash adaptation of the movie musical "42nd Street." But soon the biggest hits were arriving from an unexpected source -- London. Producer Cameron Mackintosh redefined the business of show business as "Cats," "Les Misřables," "The Phantom of the Opera," and "Miss Saigon" became international blockbusters.
Online
2005; 2004
7.

I'll Make Me a World: Vol. 1 Lift Every Voice [electronic resource]

Loading...
The video looks at the trials and triumphs of the first generation of African-American artists born to freedom.
Online
2005; 1999
8.

I'll Make Me a World: Vol. 2 Without Fear or Shame [electronic resource]

Loading...
This video focuses on the years of the Harlem Renaissance. Female blues singers bring their southern sounds north and a flourishing African-American arts scene in New York City creates widespread interest in black culture.
Online
2005; 1999
9.

I'll Make Me a World: Vol. 3 Bright Like a Sun [electronic resource]

Loading...
The Great Depression and World War II challenged African-American artists to revise, adapt and expand their visions and dreams.
Online
2005; 1999
10.

I'll Make Me a World: Vol. 5 Not a Rhyme Time [electronic resource]

Loading...
Between 1963 and 1986, a cultural revolution began as black artists challenged mainstream aesthetics, identity and power, and ultimately defied the very notion of a mainstream.
Online
2005; 1999
11.

I'll Make Me a World: Vol. 6 the Freedom You Will Take [electronic resource]

Loading...
In reaction to the narrow depiction of African Americans, the contemporary culture landscape has been transformed by the power of African-American film, dance, rap-music and spoken-word scene.
Online
2005; 1999
12.

Jazz: Episode 1 Gumbo [electronic resource]

Loading...
Jazz is born in New Orleans at the turn of the century emerging from several forms of music including ragtime, marching bands, work songs, spirituals, creole music, funeral parade music and above all, the blues. Musicians profiled here who advanced early jazz are Buddy Bolden, Jelly Roll Morton, Sidney Bechet, Freddie Keppard, and musicians of the Original Dixieland Jazz Band.
Online
2005; 2000
13.

Jazz: Episode 2 the Gift [electronic resource]

Loading...
Second of 10 episodes tracing the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans to the present day, this video features Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington and describesthe beginning of the Jazz Age in New York and Chicago during the early 1920's.
Online
2005; 2000
14.

Jazz: Episode 3 Our Language [electronic resource]

Loading...
The third of 10 episodes tracing the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans to its heights and continuing presence, this video includes the artists Bessie Smith, Bix Biederbecke, Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw.
Online
2005; 2000
15.

Jazz: Episode 4 the True Welcome [electronic resource]

Loading...
Fourth of 10 episodes tracing the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans, this video is set during the 1930's. Mired in the Great Depression, jazz is called upon to the lift the spirits of a frightened country. Features artists Benny Goodman, Louis Armstrong, and Duke Ellington.
Online
2005; 2000
16.

Jazz: Episode 5 Swing, Pure Pleasure [electronic resource]

Loading...
Fifth of 10 episodes tracing the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans, this video is set in the mid 1930's. The Great Depression stubbornly refuses to lift and jazz comes as close as ever to being America's most popular music. Its new name is Swing, and Benny Goodman finds himself with a host of rivals, including Tommy Dorsey and Glen Miller. Billy Holiday emerges to begin her career as the greatest of all female jazz singers.
Online
2005; 2000
17.

Jazz: Episode 6 Swing, the Velocity of Celebration [electronic resource]

Loading...
Sixth of 10 episodes tracing the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans, this video is set in the late 1930's. Swing is still a national craze that keeps on growing despite the Depression.
Online
2005; 2000
18.

Jazz: Episode 7 Dedicated to Chaos [electronic resource]

Loading...
Seventh of 10 episodes tracing the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans, this video is set in the early 1940's. When America enters World War II in 1941, jazz music goes to war too, and swing becomes a symbol of democracy. Glenn Miller and Artie Shaw take their music to the men and women of the armed forces overseas.
Online
2005; 2000
19.

Jazz: Episode 8 Risk [electronic resource]

Loading...
Eighth of 10 episodes tracing the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans. Despite the escalation of the Cold War, America's musical tastes turn to sentimental singers and rhythm and blues. New gifted musicians emerge including Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck, Gerry Mulligan and John Lewis.
Online
2005; 2000
20.

Jazz: Episode 9 Adventure [electronic resource]

Loading...
Ninth of 10 episodes tracing the history of Jazz from its roots in the African-American community of New Orleans. In the 1950's post-war prosperity continues but beneath its placid surface is a growing demand for civil rights. Louis Armstrong speaks out and Miles Davis becomes an icon for an entire generation of Americans. Saxophonists Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane and Ornette Coleman make their debut and introduce a new jazz movement -- the avant garde.
Online
2005; 2000