You searched for:

Series
:
Treasures of the World: North America and the Caribbean Sea
x
26 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Palenque, Mexico: Ruined City of the Maya

A prime example of a Mayan sanctuary of the classical period, Palenque was at its height between 500 and 700 A.D. and had a great influence in the entire basin of the Usumacinta River. The elegance and craftsmanship of the construction, as well as the lightness of the sculpted reliefs illustrating Mayan mythology, attest to the creative genius of this civilization.
Online
2017; 1996
2.

Chichén Itzá, Mexico: The Mystery of the Decline of the Maya

This site is one of the most impressive testimonies to the Mayan-Toltec civilization of the Yucatán (10th to 15th centuries). It contains some of the most outstanding examples of Central American architecture, combining Mayan construction techniques and Toltec sculpted decoration.
Online
2017; 2002
3.

The Rocky Mountains, Canada: A Journey Back to the Ice Age

Studded with mountain peaks, glaciers, lakes, waterfalls, canyons and limestone caves, the contiguous national parks of Banff, Jasper, Kootenay and Yoho, as well as the Mount Robson, Mount Assiniboine and Hamber provincial parks, form a striking mountain landscape. The Burgess Shale fossil site, well known for its fossil remains of soft-bodied marine animals, is also found there.
Online
2017; 2001
4.

Anthony Island, Canada: Home of the Haida

With its houses and its 32 totem and mortuary poles, the village of Ninstints, on Anthony Island, which was abandoned towards the end of the 19th century, offers a unique view of the activity of the indigenous Indian hunters and fishermen who once lived on the North Pacific coast.
Online
2017; 1998
5.

Oaxaca and Monte Alban, Mexico: The White Mountain

Inhabited over a period of 1,500 years by a succession of peoples—Olmecs, Zapotecs and Mixtecs—the terraces, dams, canals, pyramids and artificial mounds of Monte Alban were literally carved out of the mountain and are the symbols of a sacred topography. Nearby, the checkerboard design of Oaxaca is a good example of Spanish colonial architecture.
Online
2017; 2000
6.

The Statue of Liberty, United States: Symbol of Freedom

Made in Paris by the French sculptor Bartholdi, with help on the metalwork from Gustave Eiffel, this symbolic monument to liberty was a gift from France on the centenary of American independence. Standing at the entrance of New York Harbor, it has welcomed millions of immigrants to the United States of America since it was inaugurated in 1886.
Online
2017; 1999
7.

Santiago de Cuba, Cuba

Commercial and political rivalries in the Caribbean region in the 17th century resulted in the construction of this massive series of fortifications on a rocky promontory, built to protect the important port of Santiago. This intricate complex of forts, magazines, bastions and batteries is the most complete, best-preserved example of Spanish-American military architecture, based on Italian and Renaissance design principles.
Online
2017; 2001
8.

Independence Hall, United States: The Sound of Liberty

The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were signed in this hall in the heart of Philadelphia in 1776 and 1787, respectively. Since then, the universal principles set forth in these two documents of fundamental importance to American history have continued to guide lawmakers all over the world.
Online
2017; 2002
9.

Monticello and the University of Virginia, United States

The mansion of Monticello and the "academical village" of the University of Virginia reflect the design of their architect, Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), who was strongly influenced by the Enlightenment. They are excellent examples of Neoclassicism, seen in the relationship of the buildings with nature and the blending of functionalism and symbolism.
Online
2017; 2000
10.

Quebec, Canada: The French Heart of North America

Founded by the French explorer Champlain in the early 17th century, the former capital of Nouvelle-France came under English rule from the middle of the 18th century until the middle of the 19th century. Its upper town, built on the cliff, has remained the religious and administrative center with its churches, convents and other monuments such as the Citadel, the Parliament and Chateau Frontenac. Together with the lower town and its ancient quarters, it forms an urban ensemble which is one of the best examples of a fortified colonial town.
Online
2017; 1999
11.

Trinidad and the Valle de los Ingenios, Cuba: Bitter Sugar

Founded in the early 16th century in honor of the Holy Trinity, the city was a bridgehead for the conquest of the American continent. Its 18th- and 19th-century buildings, such as the Palacio Brunet and the Palacio Cantero, were built in its days of prosperity from the sugar trade.
Online
2017; 2001
12.

Head-Smashed-in Buffalo Jump, Canada: The Bison Precipice

In southwest Alberta, the remains of marked trails and an aboriginal camp and a tumulus where vast quantities of buffalo (American bison) skeletons can still be found are evidence of a custom practiced by indigenous peoples of the North American plains for nearly 6,000 years. Using their excellent knowledge of the topography and of buffalo behavior, they killed their prey by chasing them over a precipice; the carcasses were later carved up in the camp below.
Online
2017; 2003
13.

San Juan de Puerto Rico, United States: Spain’s Bulwark in the Caribbean

Between the 15th and 19th centuries, a series of defensive structures was built at this strategic point in the Caribbean Sea to protect the city and the Bay of San Juan. They represent a fine display of European military architecture adapted to harbor sites in the Western Hemisphere.
Online
2017; 2001
14.

Yellowstone National Park, United States

The vast natural forest of Yellowstone National Park covers more than 3,400 square miles; 96% of the park lies in Wyoming, 3% in Montana and 1% in Idaho. Yellowstone contains half of all the world's known geothermal features, with more than 10,000 examples. It also has the world's largest concentration of geysers (more than 300, or two-thirds of all those on the planet). Established in 1872, Yellowstone is equally known for its wildlife, such as grizzly bears, wolves, bison and wapitis.
Online
2017; 2000
15.

Puebla, Mexico: City of Churches and Beetles

About 60 miles east of Mexico City, at the foot of Popocatépetl volcano, Puebla was founded ex nihilo in 1531. The great religious buildings of Puebla such as the cathedral (16th and 17th centuries), superb palaces like the old Archbishop's Palace, as well as a host of houses whose walls are covered in tiles (azulejos) have been preserved.
Online
2017; 2003
16.

Grand Canyon National Park, United States: A Cross-Section of the Ages

Carved out by the Colorado River, the Grand Canyon—nearly 5,000 feet deep—is the most spectacular gorge in the world. Located in the state of Arizona, it cuts across the Grand Canyon National Park. Its horizontal strata retrace the geological history of the past 2 billion years. Prehistoric traces also remain of human adaptation to a particularly harsh environment.
Online
2017; 2000
17.

Taos Pueblo, United States: Native American Culture on the Rio Grande

Situated in the valley of a small tributary of the Rio Grande, this adobe settlement consists of dwellings and ceremonial buildings representing the culture of the Pueblo Indians of Arizona and New Mexico.
Online
2017; 2002
18.

Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic: City of Christopher Columbus

After the discovery of the island in 1492 by Christopher Columbus, Santo Domingo became the site of the first cathedral, hospital, customs house and university in the Americas. This colonial town, which was founded in 1498, was laid out on a grid pattern, which became the model for almost all town-planners in the New World.
Online
2017; 1996
19.

The Rideau Canal, Canada: A Romance Between Nature and Technology

The Rideau Canal—a monumental early-19th-century construction covering 202 km of the Rideau and Cataraqui Rivers, from Ottawa south to Kingston Harbor, on Lake Ontario—was built primarily for strategic military purposes at a time when Great Britain and the United States vied for control of the region. The site, one of the first canals to be designed specifically for steam-powered vessels, also features an ensemble of fortifications. It is the best-preserved example of a slackwater canal in North America, demonstrating the use of this European technology on a large scale. It is the only canal dating from the great North American canal-building era of the early 19th century to remain operational along its original line with most of its structures intact.
Online
2017; 2010
20.

Hawaii, United States: Home of Pele, Goddess of Fire

This site contains two of the most active volcanoes in the world: Mauna Loa (13,681 feet high) and Kilauea (4,101 feet high), both of which tower over the Pacific Ocean. Volcanic eruptions have created a constantly changing landscape, and the lava flows reveal surprising geological formations. Rare birds and native species can be found there, as well as forests of giant ferns.
Online
2017; 2006