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1.

Diet and Disease in Modern Society [electronic resource]

What's so bad about saturated fat, and what makes fiber so good? In a society where convenience foods rule and obesity is a national epidemic, it's time to find out. This video investigates the relationship between diet and a number of frequently interrelated diseases and conditions, including heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure, hardening of the arteries, obesity, Type 2 diabetes, and cancer. Topics include high- and low-density lipoproteins; saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats; soluble and insoluble fiber; electrolyte minerals; antioxidants and free radicals; the effects of smoking and alcohol consumption; Disability-Adjusted Life Years; and the Body Mass Index. "You are what you eat!" isn't a cliche; it's a fact of life-and of good health. Correlates to Nati [...]
Online
2005; 2004
2.

Nutrients [electronic resource]: Their Interactions

If taste were a reliable guide to a nutritious diet, candy and soda would be two food groups vital to good health-but it's not. That's why this video takes a scientific look at dietary nutrients, explaining what they are, why the body needs them, and how they work with each other to produce energy, stimulate growth, repair and maintain hard and soft tissues, and regulate bodily processes. Metabolism, energy yield from different food types, the composition and role of blood, key vitamins and minerals, dietary fiber, and recommended daily allowances are only a few of the topics covered in this detailed overview of the biochemistry of nutrition. The impact of nutritional deficiencies on short- and long-term health is also discussed. Correlates to National Science Education Standards and [...]
Online
2005; 2004
3.

Teens Dealing With Death [electronic resource]

Maybe it's hearing about friends, driving home from a dance, who get into a car wreck that no one survives. Or a fellow student - the one who wears a bandanna to hide what chemotherapy has done to her hair - one day fails to show up for homeroom. Or an announcement over the school's PA system: "There will be a memorial service this afternoon..." For many young people, this will be their first exposure to death. How can teachers and school administrators help guide them through the experience? This program features Camp Comfort Zone, in Virginia, where viewers meet teens who have come to spend a weekend of talking, enjoying the outdoors, and sharing their grief over someone they've lost. The stories range from suicide, to sudden death, to terminal illness, and as the camp weekend prog [...]
Online
2005; 2004
4.

Nourishing Earth [electronic resource]: Natural Systems Agriculture and Ecological Technologies

Could the prairie, which runs on sunlight and rain, be the model for the perfect farm? This program explores natural systems agriculture, or perennial polyculture, an alternative to industrial agriculture and agroforestry that combines cutting-edge science with nature itself. Dr. Wes Jackson, a MacArthur Fellow and founder of the Land Institute, illustrates these concepts in action, discussing the environmental and economic advantages of perennials-rather than annuals-grown in a mixture that mimics the prairie ecosystem. John Todd, a designer of ecological technologies, leads a tour of one of his "living machines" used to clean sewage water.
Online
2005; 2003
5.

Alice Walker [electronic resource]: Everyday Use

Maggie sees the old family quilt-an heirloom already promised to her-as something with practical utility as well as tradition. Her educated, social activist sister wants to hang it on the wall as folk art. With whom will their mother side? A study in class differences and the reclamation of Black history, Alice Walker's short story "Everyday Use" is beautifully realized in this dramatization.
Online
2005; 2003
6.

Liberty and Security in an Age of Terrorism [electronic resource]

The U.S. is on orange alert, and the citizens of Midburgh are on the lookout for "suspicious activity." What should they do when circumstantial evidence indicating a potential terrorist plot points to two people of Arab ethnicity? This Fred Friendly Seminar, produced as part of Columbia University's 250th Anniversary, explores the balance between national security and civil liberties in the post-9/11 world. Is one price of vigilance suspicion among neighbors? Do the demands of security now require broader government power to investigate and to detain? Using a hypothetical scenario, moderator Professor Michael Dorf of Columbia Law School pushes the panelists to confront these issues. Panelists include Viet Dinh, a principal architect of the USA PATRIOT Act; Congressman Barney Frank (D [...]
Online
2005; 2003
7.

Let's Do Lunch [electronic resource]

Who has time? "I don't need the calories." "A double bacon cheeseburger, fries.now that's a good lunch!" Sound familiar? Grab your students' attention with Let's Do Lunch and show them why that second meal of the day is vital to their health and academic performance. Covers childhood obesity and related conditions, the basics of balanced nutrition, good and bad cholesterol and different types of fat, and how to start making healthier food choices. Dieticians and an athletic trainer add their stamp of authority, while savvy teens offer quick, easy, healthy, and delicious lunch and snack ideas. Break the fast food, junk food, no food habit! Correlates to the National Health Education Standards and the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education.
Online
2005; 2004
8.

Walt Whitman [electronic resource]

A self-styled sketch runs, "Walt Whitman, an American, one of the roughs, a kosmos." He could have added journalist, carpenter, nurse, and one of the greatest poets in English. This program presents a unique literary biography, tracing Whitman's childhood, various careers, and the evolution of the masterpiece that proved his lifelong work, Leaves of Grass. A collage of photos, paintings, and manuscripts accompanies excerpts of letters from Whitman and Ralph Waldo Emerson, as well as readings from sections of Leaves of Grass, such as "Song of Myself," "I Sing the Body Electric," and "Native Moments.
Online
2005; 2004
9.

Emily Dickinson [electronic resource]

While many of her literary peers achieved notoriety, "the woman in white" remained virtually unknown-by choice. The self-imposed obscurity of Emily Dickinson is just one of many aspects of her life that this program explores. Blending daguerreotypes, paintings, manuscripts, excerpts from Dickinson's letters, and readings from nearly a dozen of her poems, this program presents the biography of one of America's most unique and influential voices in poetry.
Online
2005; 2004
10.

The Concepts of Equilibrium [electronic resource]

Starting with a definition of reversible reactions, this program covers the basic concepts of chemical equilibrium and the equilibrium law. The concept of equilibrium is illustrated by comparison to the movement of cars in and out of a parking lot, the motion of a person walking the opposite way on a moving walkway, and the movement of people on and off paddleboats. The video concludes by considering what an equilibrium constant indicates about a reaction in terms of the relative quantities of reactants and products present at equilibrium. Carbon monoxide in the bloodstream is used to illustrate that point.
Online
2005; 2003
11.

The Amazing Mole [electronic resource]

The discovery of the mole and its relationship to mass, volume, concentration, and number of particles revolutionized science in its day. With stunning graphics and visual metaphors, this program introduces students to this fundamental concept in chemistry, explaining in a step-by-step way the scale of atomic particles, Avogadro's number, moles in reactions, molar mass, and mole formulas. The program is conveniently divided into chapters to facilitate stopping for reviews and exercises.
Online
2005; 2003
12.

Work It Out! [electronic resource]: Strategies for Resolving Conflict

Last year's Spring Fling at Jefferson High School was a total disaster-and this year's student committee doesn't want it to happen again! But can the group put aside the past and work together constructively to create a successful dance? This video uses scenario analysis to model four key conflict resolution strategies: taking the person out of the problem; focusing on issues, not egos; being objective; and creating win-win solutions. Show your students that differences are a part of who we are-and that while we may not get along with each other all the time, we do have to find positive ways to work out our disagreements.
Online
2005
13.

The Unelected [electronic resource]: Lobbies

In America, a shadow government wields incredible influence over what gets done inside the Beltway-and who reaps the benefits. In this program, correspondent Hedrick Smith spotlights the powerful influence of the nation's special interest lobbies during the Clinton years. Majority Whip Tom DeLay; Charles Blixt, of R. J. Reynolds; Mike Pertschuk, of the Advocacy Institute; members of Congress; lobbyists; and others scrutinize how UPS paralyzed OSHA's efforts to improve worker safety and how the medical insurance lobby's "Harry and Louise" ads helped sink the Clinton healthcare reform bill. In-depth reporting reveals the stealth tactics used by the tobacco industry in its ongoing fight against federal legislation.
Online
2005; 1996
14.

Using Samples [electronic resource]

This program begins with an explanation of the difference between a Population and a Sample, and the reasons why samples are so important in estimating data relating to populations too large or too impractical to be measured in their entirety. The program emphasizes the need for random samples, explains how several random samples of the same size will vary, and then looks at ways of dealing with this variability, calculating the Standard Error of the Mean, and how to estimate the "95% Confidence Interval. The program goes on to show how, when dealing with quantitative data, you can calculate the size of the sample that is needed in order to achieve the precision required.
Online
2005; 1996
15.

Wuthering Heights [electronic resource]: Critical Guide

Imagery and narrative style are examined in this critical analysis of Emily Bronte's classic novel of passion and death on the Yorkshire moors. Imagery in the novel springs directly from the wild landscape of Haworth-Bronte's birthplace. "The eternal rocks beneath" are compared to Catherine's love for Heathcliff; moths on the heather and flowering harebells reflect Catherine's peaceful resting place in "heaven. "Barrier" images of windows, doors, and gates convey the geographical, spiritual, and emotional isolation of the characters-their rising passion accompanied by narrative descriptions of wild streams and windy cliffs. An interesting segment explains Bronte's use of double narrators to move back and forth in time.
Online
2005; 1992
16.

A Gift for Math [electronic resource]

Endowed with an elementary representation mechanism, the human brain is naturally predisposed toward mathematics. This program seeks to understand the biological basis of humankind's "gift for math"-and why, beyond that baseline computational ability, some people are capable of scaling the highest peaks of mathematical comprehension. Experiments with animals, studies of very young children, cases involving patients with brain injuries, and analysis of brain imaging data are included.
Online
2005; 2000
17.

Atoms and Molecules [electronic resource]

In this concise and logically formatted program, students discover the fundamental building blocks of the universe: the elements. Lively computer animation makes the atom and its constituent parts-the proton, neutron, and electron-easy to understand. The Bohr Model and the Quantum Mechanical Model of the atom are clearly differentiated. Working from these concepts, students can then make sense of the Periodic Table with its arrangement according to Atomic Mass. The program also explains the concept of the mole and the different chemical bonds within molecules and compounds. A valuable summary at the end of the video reinforces all the concepts. Correlates to Project 2061 Benchmarks for Science Literacy from the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Online
2005; 2001
18.

Your Immune System [electronic resource]

Every day is a new battle for the human body as microscopic intruders try to muscle their way in. What specialized cells and organs are there to resist them? This program clearly and concisely maps out the complicated human immune system, explaining both how it keeps the body healthy and what happens to the body if it malfunctions - or, even worse, if it shuts down completely. Beginning with the body's nonspecific defenses, composed of the skin, tears, mucus, saliva, and stomach acid, the program then digs into the details of the specific defenses: the lymphatic system, the thymus gland, the spleen, and bone marrow. Three distinct types of white blood cells are classified, and the complexities of the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses are carefully sorted out. The program als [...]
Online
2005; 2001
19.

Amending the Constitution [electronic resource]

This program is an indispensable tool for helping students to understand the constitutional amendment process and to see its importance in their own lives. It defines what an amendment is, explains why amendments have been needed down through the centuries, and describes the process for proposing and ratifying an amendment. Amendments used as illustrations of the process of changing the Constitution have been carefully selected for their interest value to today's students. Correlates to National Standards for United States History Education.
Online
2005; 2002
20.

Bullies [electronic resource]

In the U.S., an estimated 1.6 million students in grades six through ten are bullied one or more times per week-and as many as 150,000 victims cut classes each day just to avoid it. In this program, Dr. James Shaw, author of Jack and Jill: Why They Kill, explains how to confront and counter bullying in the nation's schools. Candid interviews with bullied students including Evan Ramsey, convicted of killing his school's principal and a classmate, as well as with two reformed bullies-one male, one female-provide a wide-ranging peer perspective on school violence. Students also share their successes as part of anti-bullying and peer mediation programs in their schools.
Online
2005; 2002