You searched for:

Series
:
South-Western Introduction to Business DOD Collection (50)
x
39 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Supply and Demand [electronic resource]: Christmas, a Case Study

In the industrialized world, Christmas means megabucks to the businesses that can create a fad or spot a trend. Filmed from a U.K. perspective, this program illustrates the annual scramble of key holiday-related industries-toys, video games, music CDs, luxury items, Christmas trees, and holiday foods-to catch the seasonal wave and ride it to high profits. But which products within each category will capture shoppers' attention? The dynamics of-and glitches in-the global supply and demand cycle are thoroughly covered, factoring in the effects of brands, product licensing, advertising, research and development, and offshore manufacturing.
Online
2005; 2001
2.

Name Brand Counterfeiting [electronic resource]: Global Economic Crisis

Cheap lookalikes of popular goods are flooding the world's markets, depriving legitimate manufacturers of hundreds of billions of dollars each year. This eye-opening expose follows the anti-counterfeit investigators of Cartier and BIC from their headquarters to New York and Nigeria and then on to China as they hurry to trace and stop the flow of illegal goods at the source. But bringing injunctions and carrying out raids against the many vendors, Internet merchants, and wholesalers require time, which is not on their side. Every day, inferior fakes are siphoning off sales while tarnishing their products' reputations for high quality.
Online
2006; 2002
3.

Fair Trade, Fair Profit [electronic resource]: Making Green Enterprise Work

All over the world, green enterprise is growing. This program focuses on the catalyst that is transforming Earth-friendly businesses into paying ventures: a thing that economists call externalities. In Mexico, coffee growers use collective bargaining to create a more secure market. In Tanzania, where malaria is rampant, a mosquito net manufacturer makes good by marketing social change. In Brazil, babassu nut farmers preserve their traditional business by finding markets for their nut by-products. And in Uganda, impoverished entrepreneurs rebuild their community with startup money from a nontraditional venture capital fund called C3.
Online
2005; 2002
4.

Richard Branson [electronic resource]: My Life

He made his first million at eighteen. Today, Sir Richard Branson heads an empire of international businesses that includes airlines, railroads, mobile phones, and cosmetics. In this intimate, dynamic portrait of his life, Branson talks about his upbringing, his entrepreneurial philosophy, and the story of his many successful ventures. In settings as diverse as his home in Oxford, a limo in New York, or aboard his new bullet train, Branson discusses the concept of a brand and how over 200 different Virgin brands mean different things to different people in different countries.
Online
2006; 2003
5.

The Value of Brand Names [electronic resource]

In the consumer goods industry, branding is crucial to market penetration. Using Alessi's superlative line of home furnishings and Nestle's well-known Nescafe coffee as examples, modules one and two of this program seek to understand the cachet that surrounds brand names, which gives the products associated with them an added appeal. Module three goes inside the U.K. offices of advertising giant Young & Rubicam to investigate how brands are developed and maintained.
Online
2005; 1999
6.

Your Computer, Your Way [electronic resource]: Dell and the Direct Sales Model

At Dell Computers, four hours is all it takes to build, test, and ship a custom PC. In this program, NewsHour correspondent Tom Bearden investigates Dell Computers' direct sales model and its impact on retailers and manufacturers. Visionary Michael Dell and top industry executives from Compaq, Gateway, and Circuit City stress the vital importance of improving supply chain management, providing single-point accountability, and leveraging efficiencies. But as Gateway and Circuit City scramble to exploit the trend toward customization, are computer manufacturers gearing up to eliminate retail altogether?
Online
2005; 1999
7.

Trade [electronic resource]: Dollar Speaks English

Filmed in China, India, South Africa, and the U.S., this program demonstrates how the evolution of international trade has made English an indispensable business partner all around the world. Case studies spotlighting Coca-Cola, Bloomberg Television, Virgin Atlantic, Mahindra BT, and the British School of Language emphasize the importance of seamless communication across time zones, geographical boundaries, and cultural divides. Featured personalities include David Crystal, author of The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language, and the Harvard Business School's Rosabeth Moss Kanter.
Online
2005; 2001
8.

Why We Buy [electronic resource]

This program places consumers under a microscope to quantify the psychological spectrum of buying, from everyday habits that typically steer Americans through their supermarkets and malls to a clinical disorder in which the high of making a purchase becomes the goal of shopping. James Twitchell, author of ADCULT USA; psychologist David Lewis, author of The Soul of the New Consumer; Brian Wansink, director of the University of Illinois' Food and Brand Lab; brand strategist Robin Lauffer; and others focus on a variety of topics, including the biochemistry of shopping, the intersection of branding and lifestyle, consumerism as a way of life, and compulsive shopping disorder.
Online
2005; 2001
9.

Major League Entrepreneurs [electronic resource]

Filmed at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, this program teams up Mark Cuban, billionaire owner of the Dallas Mavericks and cofounder of Broadcast.com, and Daniel Snyder, owner of the Washington Redskins, who made his team one of the most valuable franchises in sports history. Together they discuss being an entrepreneur in the world of professional sports, while MBA students and faculty ask questions about management styles, the lure of owning a sports team, and the impact of salary caps.
Online
2005; 2000
10.

The Built-to-Order Revolution [electronic resource]

One pioneered the built-to-order method of mail-order. The other set the standard for just-in-time delivery. Together, they have changed the way the world does business. In this program, Michael Dell, chairman and CEO of Dell Computer Corporation, and Frederick Smith, chairman, president, and CEO of FedEx Corporation, discuss their business models. In addition, MBA students and faculty from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin ask questions about crisis management, successfully growing a company, and balancing work with personal time.
Online
2005; 2001
11.

Production Planning and Cost Management [electronic resource]

Global competition has made business optimization more important than ever. In module one of this program, Ernst & Young describes the concept of process-oriented cost accounting. Module two focuses on lean production, as demonstrated by "smart factory" technology and tight manufacturer/supplier cooperation, while module three concentrates on how Electrolux Hungary makes decisions concerning outsourcing and the optimal investment of scarce funds.
Online
2005; 1999
12.

Pull Marketing Techniques [electronic resource]

Because the Internet is a dynamic environment, pull marketing is an ideal tool for directing traffic to particular Web sites. This program presents the benefits of opt-in e-mail; niche communities built around Web portals, newsletters, and ad networks; and Webcasts-powerful attention-grabbing techniques that can be incorporated into virtually any online pull marketing strategy. In addition, P.R. disasters that can stem from trampling a Netizen's right to privacy by spamming and covertly collecting demographic, user path, and purchase information are addressed.
Online
2005; 2000
13.

Push Marketing Techniques [electronic resource]

Push marketing, the essence of traditional advertising, easily translates to the Internet. This program explores a smorgasbord of online push marketing options, from staples including search engine optimization, banner ads, and interstitials to delicacies such as promotions, affiliations, sponsorships, and even rich media. The difference between directory- and spidering-based search engines is spelled out, and the value of reinforcing an online presence with offline advertising and guerilla marketing is also considered.
Online
2005; 2000
14.

The Deep Dive [electronic resource]: One Company's Secret Weapon for Innovation

Numbering Nike, Apple, and Procter & Gamble among its many big-name clients, it looks as if IDEO, one of the most influential product development firms in the world, is on to something. In this program, ABC News anchor Ted Koppel and correspondent Jack Smith visit IDEO to see the company demonstrate its highly effective form of brainstorming called the "deep dive. An enemy of planning done by a lone genius behind closed doors, this company uses its deep dive technique-a form of focused chaos-to creatively redesign a shopping cart through what it refers to as a process of enlightened trial and error.
Online
2006; 1999
15.

The Industry Leaders and Online Strategy [electronic resource]

Just as in the bricks-and-mortar world, a marketing plan is a must in cyberspace. In this program, leaders in the field of online marketing cut through the confusion to lay out the principles of driving traffic, branding, and targeting on the Internet. Executives from companies including 24/7 Media, Renegade Marketing Group, Beyond Interactive, and Media Metrix offer keen insights into a wide range of topics, such as the value of online linking, how to effectively integrate offline and online brands, and the use of focus groups and site registration to gather demographic information on niche communities.
Online
2005; 2000
16.

Microsoft vs. The Justice Department [electronic resource]: Playing Monopoly

Microsoft has allegedly made predatory use of its monopoly power to stifle competition, integrated its own browser software into Windows' core code, and manufactured Internet Explorer with embedded Microsoft-oriented hyperlinks. This Emmy Award-winning NewsHour program, which combines footage of top Microsoft executives and their opponents with a hands-on examination of the Windows operating system, neatly presents the root causes of the long-running and acrimonious Microsoft anti-trust trial-in plain English.
Online
2005; 1998
17.

Technological Development in Business [electronic resource]

Without adopting new technological developments, a company's profits will lag; with them, they can soar. This program uses two case studies-Ford and Australia Post-as they introduce very different types of technology in their respective organizations. Can these companies hope to maintain sales, market share, and profit if they are not in a position to exploit the latest technological advancements?
Online
2006; 2003
18.

Arsenic and Old Lace [electronic resource]: Study in Turnaround Management

Sometimes transforming a failing enterprise takes the surgeon's knife. Renowned business consultant Gerry Robinson prefers the axe. In this behind-the-scenes case study, Robinson applies his business acumen to The Vernon Road Bleaching and Dyeing Company, a British lace dyeing operation bought in bankruptcy by the father/son team of Henry and Richard Chaplin. Taking Richard to task for, among other things, disastrous inconsistency in decision-making and poor communication with employees, Robinson suggests re-motivating workers by building bridges of trust and respect-and, failing that, by the exit of the boss himself.
Online
2006; 2003
19.

Mexico City [electronic resource]: Largest City

This program defines Mexico City's globalization in terms of winners and losers, examining how, in the world's largest metropolis, immigration challenges are linked to poverty and population influx from surrounding rural areas. Contrasting the city's high-tech facilities and fashionable neighborhoods with its sprawling slums and their struggling inhabitants, the program outlines the relationship between foreign investment and the worldwide need for cheap labor, which Mexico and its indigenous peoples readily supply. Glimpses into a tech-savvy youth culture and the persistent Zapatista movement reinforce the capital's nickname: City of Contrasts.
Online
2006; 2004
20.

Globalization Is Good [electronic resource]

Controversial writer Johan Norberg argues forcefully for one side of the globalization debate. In this program he examines three developing countries and how they fit into that debate, building a case for deregulation, the abolishment of subsidies and tariffs, and a long-term view of industrialization. He frankly defends the use of sweatshop labor, through which Taiwan has cultivated a vigorous, targeted manufacturing sector and transformed agrarian poverty into affluence. Praising Vietnam for following the same path and criticizing Kenya as an unfortunate example of isolationism, Norberg's assertions compose a powerful catalyst for classroom discussion.
Online
2006; 2003