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Science Core Curriculum Video Library
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1.

Nourishing Earth [electronic resource]: Natural Systems Agriculture and Ecological Technologies

Could the prairie, which runs on sunlight and rain, be the model for the perfect farm? This program explores natural systems agriculture, or perennial polyculture, an alternative to industrial agriculture and agroforestry that combines cutting-edge science with nature itself. Dr. Wes Jackson, a MacArthur Fellow and founder of the Land Institute, illustrates these concepts in action, discussing the environmental and economic advantages of perennials-rather than annuals-grown in a mixture that mimics the prairie ecosystem. John Todd, a designer of ecological technologies, leads a tour of one of his "living machines" used to clean sewage water.
Online
2005; 2003
2.

The Concepts of Equilibrium [electronic resource]

Starting with a definition of reversible reactions, this program covers the basic concepts of chemical equilibrium and the equilibrium law. The concept of equilibrium is illustrated by comparison to the movement of cars in and out of a parking lot, the motion of a person walking the opposite way on a moving walkway, and the movement of people on and off paddleboats. The video concludes by considering what an equilibrium constant indicates about a reaction in terms of the relative quantities of reactants and products present at equilibrium. Carbon monoxide in the bloodstream is used to illustrate that point.
Online
2005; 2003
3.

The Amazing Mole [electronic resource]

The discovery of the mole and its relationship to mass, volume, concentration, and number of particles revolutionized science in its day. With stunning graphics and visual metaphors, this program introduces students to this fundamental concept in chemistry, explaining in a step-by-step way the scale of atomic particles, Avogadro's number, moles in reactions, molar mass, and mole formulas. The program is conveniently divided into chapters to facilitate stopping for reviews and exercises.
Online
2005; 2003
4.

Atoms and Molecules [electronic resource]

In this concise and logically formatted program, students discover the fundamental building blocks of the universe: the elements. Lively computer animation makes the atom and its constituent parts-the proton, neutron, and electron-easy to understand. The Bohr Model and the Quantum Mechanical Model of the atom are clearly differentiated. Working from these concepts, students can then make sense of the Periodic Table with its arrangement according to Atomic Mass. The program also explains the concept of the mole and the different chemical bonds within molecules and compounds. A valuable summary at the end of the video reinforces all the concepts. Correlates to Project 2061 Benchmarks for Science Literacy from the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Online
2005; 2001
5.

Your Immune System [electronic resource]

Every day is a new battle for the human body as microscopic intruders try to muscle their way in. What specialized cells and organs are there to resist them? This program clearly and concisely maps out the complicated human immune system, explaining both how it keeps the body healthy and what happens to the body if it malfunctions - or, even worse, if it shuts down completely. Beginning with the body's nonspecific defenses, composed of the skin, tears, mucus, saliva, and stomach acid, the program then digs into the details of the specific defenses: the lymphatic system, the thymus gland, the spleen, and bone marrow. Three distinct types of white blood cells are classified, and the complexities of the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses are carefully sorted out. The program als [...]
Online
2005; 2001
6.

The Impact of Global Warming [electronic resource]

Earth's temperature is on the rise-and so are incidents of severe weather and heat-related health problems. This program travels the world to observe how global warming, accelerated and exacerbated by air pollution, is affecting society. Coastal erosion in Florida, the destruction of Alaskan forests by the spruce beetle, the depletion of Montana's glaciers, the decline in North Pacific salmon, rising sea levels that threaten to engulf the world's small islands, increases in smog-related asthma, and the spread of malaria into the highlands of Africa, Madagascar, Pakistan, and Peru are all being chalked up to significant changes in ocean and air temperatures.
Online
2005; 2000
7.

Einstein [electronic resource]: Shedding Light on the Universe

This clever animated biography of Albert Einstein incorporates photos and quotes into a lively overview of the physicist's life and ideas. Careful attention is given to how Einstein reconciled conventional velocity addition with the constant speed of light and how he arrived at his special and general theories of relativity. His most famous equation, E=mc2, is derived in four simple steps. The tapping of matter's energy through fission and fusion is also addressed. As entertaining as it is informative, this program is a must for any introduction to atomic physics and Einstein's contributions to 20th-century science.
Online
2005; 2002
8.

Scientific Method [electronic resource]

This program examines the basic elements of the scientific method: defining and researching the problem, forming a hypothesis, gathering information through experimentation and observation, analyzing the data, forming a conclusion, and communicating the results. Practical applications of the scientific method, such as testing new medicines and analyzing the performance of sporting goods, are included as well. Correlates to the National Science Education Standards developed by the National Academies of Science and Project 2061 Benchmarks for Science Literacy from the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Online
2005; 1999
9.

Introduction to Life Science [electronic resource]

Launch a unit on life science with this video! It addresses central topics in biology-evolution, cellular structure, and hierarchical organization, to name only three; explains the process of scientific inquiry; and spotlights the contributions of key researchers in the life sciences, from Aristotle to Watson and Crick. The video also provides students with a bird's-eye view of many exciting biological fields, including biochemistry, ecology, genetics, marine biology, molecular biology, neuroscience, paleontology, and more. Correlates to National Academy of Sciences National Science Education Standards and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Benchmarks for Science Literacy.
Online
2005
10.

Organization and Diversity [electronic resource]

Planet Earth is teeming with life. Help your students make sense of it all by starting them at the bottom of the biosphere-home to bacteria, microbes, fungi, and insects. Organization and Diversity defines key terms, classifies the kingdoms and domains of life, outlines the Linnean hierarchical system, contrasts evolutionary taxonomy with cladistic analysis, and provides powerful DNA evidence supporting the unity of life. Also, the fascinating contributions of molecular taxonomy are showcased. Correlates to National Academy of Sciences National Science Education Standards and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Benchmarks for Science Literacy.
Online
2005
11.

Our Planet Earth [electronic resource]

If Earth's entire history could be compressed into a single year, modern humans would've appeared just 23 minutes ago! Use this video to introduce your students to the concept of geological time (also called deep time); relative age dating of rock via the principles of stratigraphic superposition, original horizontality, and cross-cutting; absolute age dating by radioactive decay; the chemical elements, heavy and light, that make up the planet; and Earth's three main layers: crust, mantle, and core.
Online
2006
12.

Plate Tectonics [electronic resource]

Studies of our planet's crust, or lithosphere, suggest that it's not a single solid layer at all. This video illustrates the process of scientific inquiry by studying the evolution of our understanding of plate tectonics, the dynamics of those ever-shifting slabs of earth we call solid ground. Beginning with Alfred Wegener's hypothesis of continental drift, the program discusses major and minor plates, types of plate boundaries, and the concepts of spreading and subduction. Earthquakes and volcanoes are also addressed.
Online
2006
13.

Atmosphere, Climate, and Weather [electronic resource]

People everywhere are interested in the weather, but how does it all work? Beginning with Earth's atmosphere-its evolution, its gaseous composition, and its four regions-this video takes a close look at how conditions combine to create climate and weather. Topics include the Koppen Climate Classification System; weather prediction; types of clouds and precipitation; thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes; and weather patterns such as El Nino and La Nina.
Online
2006
14.

Energy and Resources [electronic resource]

As the Earth's fossil fuel reserves decline, what forms of energy will come next? After discussing the formation, uses, and consequences of burning coal, oil, and natural gas, this video explores the development of alternative resources that may someday completely replace them: nuclear power, solar energy, biomass, geothermal energy, hydroelectric power, and wind power. Benefits, costs, and environmental impacts are considered.
Online
2006
15.

The Planets [electronic resource]

Any study of the universe requires a solid understanding of the solar system-home sweet home and the launching pad for intergalactic exploration. This video explains how the solar system formed and offers plenty of detailed information on the inner and outer planets. The minimum requirements for planetary life as we know it and the specifics of the Sun, asteroids, comets, and the planets' many moons are also given.
Online
2006
16.

Chemical Equations and Atomic and Molecular Mass [electronic resource]

Can a barbershop quartet introduce the subject of stoichiometry? They do in this program, which in section one presents the Law of Conservation of Mass and how to balance equations. Section two explains the difference between the mass number and atomic mass, what an isotope is, and how to work with atomic mass units to find the average atomic mass.
Online
2005; 2000
17.

Linear Momentum and Newton's Laws of Motion [electronic resource]

In section one of this program, colliding basketball players demonstrate the Principle of Conservation of Momentum, while section two debuts all three of Newton's Laws of Motion, as illustrated by moving a large bookcase, hanging from a rope, and pushing against a wall. Newtonian concepts of inertia, force, mass, weight, equilibrium, tension, and momentum, plus free-body diagramming, are also covered. "Live the laws, love the laws, be one with the laws.
Online
2005; 1999
18.

Inside Cells [electronic resource]: Cells and Their Organelles

Take your biology students on a tour of an unusual art museum-the "Cell Gallery." Using electron microscope images and entertaining graphics, this program walks viewers through the basic components of a cell. The tour looks in detail at the structure and function of cellular organelles, including cell membranes, nuclei, mitochondria, chloroplasts, smooth and rough endoplasmic reticula, ribosomes, lysosomes, vacuoles, cytoplasm, cytosol and cytoskeleton, microtubules and microfilaments, and the Golgi complex. The program also covers the importance of internal cellular membranes and compares the relative sizes of the different organelles.
Online
2005; 2002