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1.

Sarajevo Diaries [electronic resource]

At the beginning of the siege of Sarajevo in April 1992, SaGA became a place of assembly of intellectuals, film professionals, artists and students, who, despite the war, stayed in Sarajevo to preserve their way of life. From the start of the war, SaGa's teams were shooting everyday life in the streets of Sarajevo. During the siege of Sarajevo, there were more than 60 documentaries made. This episode takes a look at some of the videos The New York Times has called "part news, part horror movie" as well as a video report on musicians gathering in Sarajevo to bring attention to the Bosnian crisis. Also featured are reports on Prague's neo-Nazi skinheads; environmental protection in Haiti and Brazil; the distribution of cameras to human rights activists; and on Kosovo.
Online
1993
2.

Kosovo [electronic resource]: The Next Bosnia?

Albanians had coexisted within the Ottoman Empire for centuries while the Serbians in the region emigrated to areas under control of the Habsburgs. Upon the dissolution of the empire, the country of Albania was formed, but over two million Albanians resided throughout the rest of the Balkans. Kosovo had the largest portion of Albanians, and the area was finally granted broad autonomy by the former Yugoslavia in 1974. The rise of Serbian nationalism in the late 1980s, bolstered by expounded propaganda about Albanian oppression of Serbs in Kosovo, led to the annexation of Kosovo by Serbia in 1989. This episode surveys the resistance by ethnic Albanians against Serbian occupation. Also included are reports on Haitian prisoners held by the U.S. in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; U.S. immigration p [...]
Online
1993
3.

Norgono/Serbia [electronic resource]

Featuring American journalist and NPR and PBS foreign correspondent, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, this classic program examines human rights in the Norgono region of the South Caucasus and in Serbia.
Online
1993
4.

El Salvador [electronic resource]

Featuring American journalist and NPR and PBS foreign correspondent, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, this classic program examines human rights in El Salvador.
Online
1993
5.

Sarajevo Part 1 [electronic resource]: Ground Zero

During the siege of Sarajevo, everyday life was not just challenging, it became deadly for far too many residents. Mass killings from mortar fire occurred while people stood in line for water, attended a football game, or shopped at the market. City streets became known as "Sniper Alleys." SaGA (Sarajevo Group for Artists) had film crews throughout the city to record life in a city under siege. This episode features highlights from the more than 60 documentaries that were made during the height of the horror. Director Ademir Kenoic offers a chilling look at what life was like during that time.
Online
1993
6.

Human Rights in Northern Ireland [electronic resource]

In 1921 the six counties of Northern Ireland were partitioned from the twenty-six counties of the south. A Protestant, unionist dominated parliament was established in 1922. Its policies in the areas of housing, employment, and voting rights, discriminated against the Catholic population. Subsequent protests and preemptively violent responses from the local security eventually led to the murder of thirteen demonstrators in the incident known as Bloody Sunday. This episode examines the continuing conflict and its social and economic impacts. Andrew Tyndall reports on why the media are more interested in the troubles of the British Royals than "The Troubles" in Northern Ireland. New York Times reporter John Burns also features an interview with Irish politician and activist Bernadette [...]
Online
1994
7.

Africa Part One [electronic resource]: The Uncovered Continent

Throughout history, humanitarian military interventions have had mixed results. Colonial powers used the cover of humanitarian intervention to subjugate "savage" or "barbaric" cultures and "civilize" these countries through occupation. This episode examines the interventions in Somalia, Sudan, Liberia, and Rwanda, and their impacts on human rights. Also, reports from Tajikistan, Iraq, and South Africa look at the lasting affects of intervention. Finally, a report on a human rights activist in Zaire (now Democratic Republic of Congo), and his NGO's work to end decades of dictatorial rule.
Online
1993
8.

Ethnic Fault Lines in Europe [electronic resource]: Voices of Human Rights

Since the fall of the Austro-Hungarian empire after World War I, Hungary has had to deal with fascist hate groups. Siding with the Axis powers during World War II legitimized the pogroms against the Roma and Jewish populations during that time. The collapse of the Hungarian communist system in the early 1990s, and the ensuing social and economic instability, has led to the rise of these groups yet again. This episode examines their actions against the Jews and Gypsies of Hungary. Philanthropist George Soros discusses his human rights work in Hungary and throughout Eastern Europe. Also featured are reports on anti-war activists in Belgrade, Serbia; medical relief for Cuba; human rights heroes being honored in Washington, D.C.; and excerpts from films shown at the Human Rights Watch Fi [...]
Online
1993
9.

The First Hundred Days of the Clinton Administration [electronic resource]

When President Bill Clinton was inaugurated in January 1993, he inherited a humanitarian mission in Somalia that had U.S. troops protecting food aid and supplies; a simmering conflict in the Balkans that included charges of ethnic cleansing against the Muslim population in Bosnia-Herzegovina, as well as other human rights emergencies. His decision to enact "Don't Ask, Don't Tell' was seen as anti-gay at the time. This episode includes an interview with former President Jimmy Carter that examines the handling of these issues during the first 100 days of the Clinton administration. Also featured are reports from Sarajevo, Sri Lanka, and Mumbai.
Online
1993
10.

Rape as a Weapon of War [electronic resource]

Since 1949, Article 27 of the Fourth Geneva Convention explicitly prohibits wartime rape and enforced prostitution. Yet sexual assault of both men and women is used as a weapon to this day and has very rarely been prosecuted. This episode examines the use of rape during the conflicts in Bosnia, Kashmir, and Iraq. Charlotte Bunch, founder of the Center for Women's Global Leadership, explains her continuing fight to have the international community view women's rights as a human rights issue. Further reports on Tibetan refugees in India, on Guatemala, and on Joan Baez's visit to Sarajevo; as well as a music video about women's rights by Sweet Honey in the Rocks.
Online
1993
11.

China and Human Rights [electronic resource]

In June 1989, Zhang Boli was in Tianamen Square as one of the leaders of the pro-democracy movement. Following the bloody crackdown by China's communist leaders, Boli was able to flee the country before he was captured. This episode tells the story of his two-year trek through northern China, Russia, and finally to America, and examines Boli's secretly filmed profile. Also featured is a discussion on the controversy over China's Most Favored Nation Status as a U.S. trading partner.
Online
1993
12.

UN Human Rights Conference Preview [electronic resource]

The World Conference on Human Rights was held by the United Nations in Vienna, Austria, in 1993. With representatives of 171 nations, and some 7,000 participants overall, it was largest gathering ever on human rights. The conference did have an expansive view of human rights, with the normal political and economic rights being explicitly augmented by women's rights, indigenous peoples' rights, minority rights, and more. This episode looks at the problems, priorities, and players at the conference. UN Secretary-General Boutros-Boutros Ghali, discusses the limitations, universality, the current status, and the future of the United Nations. Also featured are reports on Cambodia's move toward democracy; a human rights advocate becomes president in Guatemala; and families of murder victim [...]
Online
1993
13.

Female Circumcision [electronic resource]

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines female circumcision, also known as female genital mutilation, as "all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons." WHO estimates that 140 million women and girls around the world have experienced it, including 101 million in Africa. This episode explores the efforts to treat female circumcision as a human rights abuse. Pulitzer prize-winning author Alice Walker discusses her novel, Possessing the Secret Joy, about the response of an African woman to this cultural tradition. Also featured, "Diary from Hell" is a documentary about Manila's Smokey Mountain garbage dump, making the link between the environment and human rights; and a Sa [...]
Online
1993
14.

Somalia [electronic resource]

Featuring American journalist and NPR and PBS foreign correspondent, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, this classic program examines human rights in the African nation of Somalia.
Online
1993
15.

Ethnic Fault Lines Revisited [electronic resource]

Although internationally recognized as part of Azerbaijan, Nogorno-Karabakh is a de facto, but unrecognized, state in the South Caucasus. In February 1988, the parliament voted to secede from Azerbaijan and unite with Armenia, igniting armed conflict. Charges of ethnic cleansing have been leveled on both sides. This episode details the events and their impact on the population. Also included are reports on Cambodia, Guatemala, and a large Muslim enclave in Serbia that has been spared the horrors of ethnic cleansing - until now. Finally, a music video of Luis de la Guerra performing "El Costa de la Vida" is highlighted.
Online
1993
16.

Panama [electronic resource]

Featuring American journalist and NPR and PBS foreign correspondent, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, this classic program examines human rights in the nation of Panama.
Online
1993
17.

North/South [electronic resource]

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between Canada, the United States, and Mexico was supposed to protect the environment, create high-wage U.S. jobs, and raise the living standards of all three countries. The downside is the loss of over half a million U.S. jobs when companies moved jobs to cheaper labor markets, and the near destruction of the Mexican farming industry due to government subsidized produce from the U.S. entering the Mexican market, and a dysfunctional public administration in Canada. This episode looks at the costs of the agreement on the environment, civil liberties, labor and health. Also featured is a Sarajevo "Video Diary," a report on the Tamil Tiger rebels in Sri Lanka, and human rights abuses against illegal immigrants at the U.S./Mexico border.
Online
1993
18.

Whatever Happened to the War Crimes Tribunal? [electronic resource]

In May of 1993, the United Nations Security Council voted unanimously to convene a war crimes tribunal to investigate crimes against humanity in Bosnia/Herzegovina and other former Yugoslav republics. Known as the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia or ICTY, and year after being formed there have been no investigations. This episode asks 'Why?' U.S. human rights expert Mort Halperin attempts to answer that question. Further reporting includes compelling video footage from the frontline in Angola; Andrew Tyndall explains why the media has ignored Mexico in their coverage of the NAFTA debate; and an interview with film director Jim Sheridan about his film "In the Name of the Father.
Online
1994
19.

South Africa [electronic resource]: A Human Rights Success Story

After years of political violence by both the African National Congress (ANC) and the white minority government, leaders realized that they were locked in a mutually harmful stalemate. A negotiated settlement was the only way to prevent more bloodshed. Negotiations for a transition to majority rule opened in 1990 and, unfortunately, led to an increase in political violence. This episode explores how this violence threatened the transition to a multi-racial democracy. Judge Richard Goldstone discusses the conspiracy at senior levels of the South African security forces to sabotage the transition to majority rule. Also featured are excerpts from Bethany Yaarrow's film "Mama Awethu" about women in South Africa. Also, "Freedom Charter," a song about the struggle to end apartheid is perfo [...]
Online
1994
20.

The United Nations and Human Rights [electronic resource]

The UN Charter gives the Security Council primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security. In fulfilling this responsibility, the Council can establish a UN peacekeeping operation. This episode examines the UN's human rights mandate in light of its peacekeeping operations in Bosnia, Somalia, and El Salvador. Kofi Annan, then Undersecretary-General of UN Peacekeeping Operations, is interviewed about these missions. Also featured are reports on Hungary's nationalist movement; on the black and Afro-Caribbean experience in the United Kingdom; and an interview with Anna Deavere Smith - writer, performer, social commentator, and star of her own one-woman show, Twilight: Los Angeles 1992.
Online
1994