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Rights & Wrongs: Human Rights Television
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1.

Sarajevo Diaries [electronic resource]

At the beginning of the siege of Sarajevo in April 1992, SaGA became a place of assembly of intellectuals, film professionals, artists and students, who, despite the war, stayed in Sarajevo to preserve their way of life. From the start of the war, SaGa's teams were shooting everyday life in the streets of Sarajevo. During the siege of Sarajevo, there were more than 60 documentaries made. This episode takes a look at some of the videos The New York Times has called "part news, part horror movie" as well as a video report on musicians gathering in Sarajevo to bring attention to the Bosnian crisis. Also featured are reports on Prague's neo-Nazi skinheads; environmental protection in Haiti and Brazil; the distribution of cameras to human rights activists; and on Kosovo.
Online
1993
2.

Sarajevo Part 1 [electronic resource]: Ground Zero

During the siege of Sarajevo, everyday life was not just challenging, it became deadly for far too many residents. Mass killings from mortar fire occurred while people stood in line for water, attended a football game, or shopped at the market. City streets became known as "Sniper Alleys." SaGA (Sarajevo Group for Artists) had film crews throughout the city to record life in a city under siege. This episode features highlights from the more than 60 documentaries that were made during the height of the horror. Director Ademir Kenoic offers a chilling look at what life was like during that time.
Online
1993
3.

Human Rights in Northern Ireland [electronic resource]

In 1921 the six counties of Northern Ireland were partitioned from the twenty-six counties of the south. A Protestant, unionist dominated parliament was established in 1922. Its policies in the areas of housing, employment, and voting rights, discriminated against the Catholic population. Subsequent protests and preemptively violent responses from the local security eventually led to the murder of thirteen demonstrators in the incident known as Bloody Sunday. This episode examines the continuing conflict and its social and economic impacts. Andrew Tyndall reports on why the media are more interested in the troubles of the British Royals than "The Troubles" in Northern Ireland. New York Times reporter John Burns also features an interview with Irish politician and activist Bernadette [...]
Online
1994
4.

Ethnic Fault Lines in Europe [electronic resource]: Voices of Human Rights

Since the fall of the Austro-Hungarian empire after World War I, Hungary has had to deal with fascist hate groups. Siding with the Axis powers during World War II legitimized the pogroms against the Roma and Jewish populations during that time. The collapse of the Hungarian communist system in the early 1990s, and the ensuing social and economic instability, has led to the rise of these groups yet again. This episode examines their actions against the Jews and Gypsies of Hungary. Philanthropist George Soros discusses his human rights work in Hungary and throughout Eastern Europe. Also featured are reports on anti-war activists in Belgrade, Serbia; medical relief for Cuba; human rights heroes being honored in Washington, D.C.; and excerpts from films shown at the Human Rights Watch Fi [...]
Online
1993
5.

UN Human Rights Conference Preview [electronic resource]

The World Conference on Human Rights was held by the United Nations in Vienna, Austria, in 1993. With representatives of 171 nations, and some 7,000 participants overall, it was largest gathering ever on human rights. The conference did have an expansive view of human rights, with the normal political and economic rights being explicitly augmented by women's rights, indigenous peoples' rights, minority rights, and more. This episode looks at the problems, priorities, and players at the conference. UN Secretary-General Boutros-Boutros Ghali, discusses the limitations, universality, the current status, and the future of the United Nations. Also featured are reports on Cambodia's move toward democracy; a human rights advocate becomes president in Guatemala; and families of murder victim [...]
Online
1993
6.

Female Circumcision [electronic resource]

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines female circumcision, also known as female genital mutilation, as "all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons." WHO estimates that 140 million women and girls around the world have experienced it, including 101 million in Africa. This episode explores the efforts to treat female circumcision as a human rights abuse. Pulitzer prize-winning author Alice Walker discusses her novel, Possessing the Secret Joy, about the response of an African woman to this cultural tradition. Also featured, "Diary from Hell" is a documentary about Manila's Smokey Mountain garbage dump, making the link between the environment and human rights; and a Sa [...]
Online
1993
7.

Ethnic Fault Lines Revisited [electronic resource]

Although internationally recognized as part of Azerbaijan, Nogorno-Karabakh is a de facto, but unrecognized, state in the South Caucasus. In February 1988, the parliament voted to secede from Azerbaijan and unite with Armenia, igniting armed conflict. Charges of ethnic cleansing have been leveled on both sides. This episode details the events and their impact on the population. Also included are reports on Cambodia, Guatemala, and a large Muslim enclave in Serbia that has been spared the horrors of ethnic cleansing - until now. Finally, a music video of Luis de la Guerra performing "El Costa de la Vida" is highlighted.
Online
1993
8.

Whatever Happened to the War Crimes Tribunal? [electronic resource]

In May of 1993, the United Nations Security Council voted unanimously to convene a war crimes tribunal to investigate crimes against humanity in Bosnia/Herzegovina and other former Yugoslav republics. Known as the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia or ICTY, and year after being formed there have been no investigations. This episode asks 'Why?' U.S. human rights expert Mort Halperin attempts to answer that question. Further reporting includes compelling video footage from the frontline in Angola; Andrew Tyndall explains why the media has ignored Mexico in their coverage of the NAFTA debate; and an interview with film director Jim Sheridan about his film "In the Name of the Father.
Online
1994
9.

The United Nations and Human Rights [electronic resource]

The UN Charter gives the Security Council primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security. In fulfilling this responsibility, the Council can establish a UN peacekeeping operation. This episode examines the UN's human rights mandate in light of its peacekeeping operations in Bosnia, Somalia, and El Salvador. Kofi Annan, then Undersecretary-General of UN Peacekeeping Operations, is interviewed about these missions. Also featured are reports on Hungary's nationalist movement; on the black and Afro-Caribbean experience in the United Kingdom; and an interview with Anna Deavere Smith - writer, performer, social commentator, and star of her own one-woman show, Twilight: Los Angeles 1992.
Online
1994
10.

Myanmar [electronic resource]: The "Keep Quiet" Regime

In Myanmar (Burma), the State Law and Order Reconciliation Council, (SLORC) was formed after a military junta took power in 1988. Since then, human rights have been regarded as among the worst in the world. International human rights organizations including Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International have repeatedly documented and condemned widespread human rights violations there. This episode reviews the human rights record in the country since the junta came to power. Also featured, an interview with Kenneth Roth of Human Rights Watch on ethnic warfare; linking trade and human rights and how the Clinton administration is viewed by human rights activists; then New York City's "El Puente Academy of Peace and Justice;" and finally Romanian musicians sing about revolution.
Online
1994
11.

Human Rights in the Occupied Territories [electronic resource]

The Oslo Accords provided for the creation of a Palestinian interim self-government, the Palestinian National Authority (PNA). The Palestinian Authority would have responsibility for the administration of the territory under its control. The Accords also called for the withdrawal of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) from parts of the Gaza Strip and West Bank. This episode examines the efforts of field workers from two different but complementary human rights groups - one Palestinian, the other Israeli - in making this a reality. Hanan Ashrawi, a one-time Palestinian peace negotiator and head of a Palestinian human rights group is interviewed. Also featured are Allen Ginsberg's new poem "Peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina" read by the author himself, and a performance by the predominantly Aust [...]
Online
1994
12.

The Media and Human Rights [electronic resource]

A drop in popularity of the Hungarian conservative political party Fidesz led to charges of liberal bias on the part of the media there. The media became a scapegoat for the defeat of the party in the 1994 parliamentary elections. This episode explores the lack of media independence in post-communist Hungary and the neo-conservative's attempt to control public television and radio. Andrew Tyndall reports on how the media covers itself. Also featured are reports on the growing number of journalists who are killed while on assignment and a profile of Belgrade's B-92, a radio station that mixes music with anti-war activism in Serbia's capital.
Online
1994
13.

Human Rights and Cuba [electronic resource]

Human Rights Watch has accused the Cuban government of systematic human rights abuses, including torture, arbitrary imprisonment, unfair trials, and extrajudicial executions. Cuban law limits freedom of expression, association, assembly, movement, and the press. This episode explores the state of human rights in Cuba. Interviews with U.S. Undersecretary of State Peter Tarnoff, and Edgardo Valdes, a Cuban government official to the UN, highlight the nature of U.S./Cuban relations. Cuban-Americans, Frank Calzon and Sam Farber, debate the continuing U.S. embargo of Cuba. Also featured is a report by filmmaker John Alpert on the relations between Cubans and Cuban-Americans from the vantage point of ordinary Cubans.
Online
1995
14.

Chechnya [electronic resource]

Sergei Kovalev was serving as Boris Yeltsin's human rights advisor when he publicly opposed Russia's military involvement in Chechnya. He cooperated with the rebels and urged Russian soldiers to give up. In this episode, he discusses the ongoing conflict along with Ludmilla Thorne of Freedom House. Also featured are a video diary from Tomas Goltz on the town of Samashki and its efforts to defend itself from the Russian army's assault, and an exclusive interview with Fred Cuny. The disaster relief specialist and human rights hero traveled to Chechnya in 1995 where he disappeared and is presumed dead.
Online
1996
15.

Global Institutions and Human Rights [electronic resource]

Global institutions - also known as intergovernmental organizations - helped promote political, economic, and legal stability in the midst of the Cold War. This episode examines the United Nations, World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and NATO, and their roles in a post-Cold War world. The roles of the World Bank and the IMF have been particularly controversial for the impact their actions have on the live of ordinary citizens such as in Mexico, and that situation is examined. Also featured is an interview with UN Assistant Secretary General Alvaro De Soto.
Online
1996
16.

Safe Havens: Part 1 [electronic resource]

In April 1993, the United Nations declared the besieged enclave of Srebrenica a safe area under UN protection. In spite of its status the town was surrounded and fell to the Bosnian Serb army in July, 1995. What followed was the worst crime on European soil since World War II. Eight thousand people - mostly men and boys - were massacred, while women, children, and the elderly were forced to leave their homes and were sent to Tuzla. This episode examines the fall of the town and whether UN officials were complicit in the slaughter and displacement of thousands of innocent civilians.
Online
1996
17.

Voices of Human Rights [electronic resource]

Adopted in response to the atrocities committed during World War II, the United Nation Declaration of Human Rights expressed the rights to which all human beings are inherently entitled. More than fifty years later, human rights activists still work to insure that these rights are respected, and shine a spotlight when they are not. This episode explores the work done by these activists. Rights Reel looks at Haitian refugees held by the U.S. government at the military base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; a video diary from the Palestinian occupied territories; and the witness program of the Lawyers Committee, which distributes video cameras to human rights activists around the world. Also included is a report on the UN Truth Commission on El Salvador and an interview with Eliot Abrams, a Sta [...]
Online
1993
18.

When Will War Crimes Be Punished? [electronic resource]

This episode focuses on the establishment of the International War Crimes Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Cherif Bassiouni, DePaul University law professor heading the UN War Crimes Commission, speaks about the character of the Tribunal. Statements by Clyde Snow (forensic anthropologist), Aryeh Neier (executive director, Human Rights Watch), Madeleine Albright, Elie Wiesel, Lawrence Eagleberger, Feryal Gharahi (Equality Now), Zeljko Raznjatovic "Arkan" and Radovan Karadzic are included. Also included are brief reports on other human rights issues in the world and a segment on a Croatian musician, Nenad Bach. Footage of prison camps, massacres, and the Nuremberg trials, is shown. Some content may be objectionable?
Online
1993
19.

Vienna Conference on Human Rights [electronic resource]

The 1993 UN Vienna Conference on Human Rights included representatives from 171 nations. The key result of the conference was the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action which states: "The promotion and protection of human rights is a matter of priority for the international community, and that the Conference affords a unique opportunity to carry out a comprehensive analysis of the international human rights system and of the machinery for the protection of human rights, in order to enhance and thus promote a fuller observance of those rights, in a just and balanced manner." This episode features interviews with conference attendees, including John Shattuck, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights. Also featured are reports on Liberia, Egypt, Angola, and a musical salut [...]
Online
1993
20.

Trade and Human Rights [electronic resource]

After years of working to end apartheid in South Africa, including 27 years in jail, Nelson Mandela and the ANC are now in power. In this episode, the new South African president discusses his plan to forge a 'government of national unity' in South Africa. Also featured is a discussion on the controversial linking of trade and human rights, including China's "Most Favored Nation" status, with Henry Kissinger, Lane Kirkland, the Dalai Lama, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights John Shattuck, and former Chinese political prisoner Wang Juntao. And finally, a look at the film "Satya: A Prayer for the Enemy" which explores the spiritual resistance of Tibetan nuns persecuted by their Chinese occupiers?
Online
1994