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Palettes (Film for the Humanities (Firm))
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21.

Fragonard [1732-1806]

In The Lock, A young man and a young woman stand between a bed and a door. Jean-Honoré Fragonard tells a story of sensual love. Each detail has a subtle meaning that reflects the traditions of pictorial science. Learn its history and legacy on this episode of Palettes.
Online
2016; 1992
22.

Gauguin [1848-1903]

Paul Gauguin painted Arearea or Joyousness during his first stay in Tahiti. The painting currently resides in the Musee d' Orsay. Learn about Gauguin's life, inspirations, and influences.
Online
2016; 2001
23.

Gericault [1791-1824]

Théodore Géricault read about the shipwreck and subsequent scandal of the Medusa, he felt compelled to re-create it on canvas. He worked obsessively on the project, executing studies, life-size sketches, painting portraits of the principal figures, and borrowed body parts from a local hospital to paint. Learn about Géricault's life, inspirations, the steps he undertook, and its legacy.
Online
2016; 1998
24.

Goya [1746-1828]

The Young Ones and The Old Ones are two painting with the same dimensions painted by Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes. Scholars hypothesize they were companion pieces but debate the true meaning behind the artwork. Learn about the artist, the paintings, and the political upheaval of the time period.
Online
2016; 1991
25.

Ingres [1780-1867]

Having arrived at the end of his life, Ingres assembled 25 nude women in a lovingly prepared canvas for The Turkish Bath. Learn about the artist's inspirations, artwork, and legacy.
Online
2016; 1989
26.

Klein [1928-1962]

Anthropometry of the Blue Epoch, #82 was purchased by the Musée national d'art moderne, Centre Georges-Pompidou, Paris in 1984. Yves Klein pioneered New Realism and created International Klein Blue. This program in the Palette series explores the artist's universe, use of the color blue, inspirations, and legacy.
Online
2016; 1996
27.

Caravaggio [1571-1610]

In 1599, Caravaggio was hired to paint the two side walls of the Church of San Luigi dei Frances. In The Calling of St. Matthew, seven men are in a dimly-lit room without depth - a scene from the Gospels in modern dress. The Martyrdom of St. Matthew depicts St. Matthew lying before the executioner. After completing the first two works, he was commissioned to paint a third. Learn about Caravaggio's history, influences, technique, and changes he implemented.
Online
2016; 1989
28.

Lorrain [~ 1602-1682]

Claude Gellée, who was nicknamed Lorrain, is considered one of the greatest landscapist of the 17th Century. He first depicted the sun on a canvas, while creating an authentic skyline. Seaport at Sunset was sold with Landscape with Rural Dance as companion pieces. Learn about the artists influences, training, legacy, and life.
Online
2016; 1989
29.

Manet [1832-1883]

When Edouard Manet exhibited Olympia, a modern re-working of Titian's Venus of Urbino, critics declared it obscene for its provocative pose and modern attributes. The model, Victorine Meurent, posed for four paintings of Manet's, including: Olympia, Le Déjeuner sur l'herbe, Woman with Parrot, and The Railroad. Seven years after Manet's death, Claude Monet started a fund to buy the picture and donate it to the state. Learn about the painting, the artist's inspirations, influences, and legacy.
Online
2016; 1996
30.

Matisse [1869-1954]

Painted in Nice, The Sorrows of the King is considered one of Henri Matisse's last masterpieces. The painter, immobilized by illness, cut out forms of paper that had previously been covered with gouache and guided an assistant to pin them on a wall. The technique, colors, composition, and genesis of the work are analyzed.
Online
2016; 1993
31.

The Frescoes of the Villa of the Mysteries, Pompeii [1st Century A.D.]

In 1909, archeologists unearthed a room at a villa outside Pompeii with frescoes painted upon the walls. Historians and archeologists have interpreted the meaning behind the murals- some believe it to describe an initiation ritual into a Dionysian cult, while others suggest it is a secular wedding ceremony. Learn about the frescoes, historians interpretations, and Pompeii.
Online
2016; 2000
32.

Poussin [1594-1665]

Duke de Richileu commissioned Nicholas Poussin to create a series depicting the seasons. The Four Seasons was completed a year before the artist's death. Learn the author's inspirations, influences, technique, and legacy.
Online
2016; 1992
33.

Raphael [1483-1520]

Raphael's Portrait of Baldassare Castiglione inspired many painters including: Rembrandt, Rubens, and Matisse. The portrait reveals the friendship between the artist and model, but also philosophy of the Renaissance and proclivities of Castiglione. Learn about the artist's technique, inspirations, influences, and legacy.
Online
2016; 1992
34.

Sassetta [1392-1450]

Franciscan monks commissioned Sassetta to create a polyptych to fit over the high alter. In 1578, the polyptych is disassembled and then sold in 1810. Today 26 fragments of the altarpiece are dispersed throughout ten museums worldwide, but many pieces have been lost. Learn the history of the polyptych, why historians believe these panels are linked, and how they were created.
Online
2016; 1989
35.

Shitao [1630-1707]

When Zhu Ruoji was three years old, Manchurian soldiers killed his family. When he grew older, he changed his name Shitao and apprenticed with Zhu Da in calligraphy. Jingting Mountains in Autumn incorporates Taoist philosophy with Shitao's roots in Buddhism. Learn about the painter's techniques, composition, and interpretations.
Online
2016; 1998
36.

Van Gogh [1853-1890]

In October 1888, Vincent Van Gogh, who had lived for eight months at Arles, painted his bedroom. A year later, when he found himself shut up in the asylum of Saint-Paul de Mausole near Saint-Rémy, he made two inexact paintings, varying colors, objects, and perspectives. Learn about the artist's inspirations, technique, and methodology.
Online
2016; 1992
37.

Veronese [1528-1588]

After the inquisition ordered him to change features in The Last Supper, Paolo Veronese decided against making any alterations and changed its name to The Feast of the House of Levi. When a fire destroyed the convent, a monk cut it into thirds and escaped with it out a window. Learn the history of the painting, the technique, its composition, and its legacy.
Online
2016; 1989
38.

Watteau [1684-1721]

Pilgrimage to Cythera was painted in 1717 by Jean-Antoine Watteau. Two years later, he created a slightly altered copy for his benefactor Jean de Jullienne. Historians still argue over interpretations of both paintings. Learn about its technique, interpretations, inspirations, and legacy.
Online
2016; 1996