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1.

The Seasons and the Symphony [electronic resource]

This program covers Vivaldi's musical celebration of the seasons and the Italian countryside; Gluck's transformation of opera into a dramatic as well as a musical experience; new ideas for symphonic composition at Mannheim; and Haydn, father of the symphony. Performers include the Bach Orchestra and Choir of St. Paul's, Academy of Ancient Music, Takacs Quartet, Mannheim Orchestra. Contents include excerpts from: Vivaldi's L'Estro Armonico, The Four Seasons; Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice; J.C. Bach's Overture No. 2; Stamitz's Symphony in D Major; Haydn's String Quartet Op. 77, Piano Trio, Symphony No. 100 ('The Military'), Lord Nelson Mass, "Emperor" Quartet, "Farewell" Symphony.
Online
1982
2.

Vibrations and Pagan Rites [electronic resource]

James Galway takes us backward through time to demonstrate how ageless and universal the human impulse is to make music. Working chronologically backward from Ligeti to Gregorian chant, Galway outlines the development of Western music. The impishness in his smile and tone are quickly submerged in the depth of his commitment to music and his enthusiastic conviction that knowledge of musical history is a prerequisite to understanding and that understanding precedes appreciation. Contents include excerpts from: Ligeti's Melodien, Messiaen's Messe de la Pentecôte, Britten's War Requiem, Gershwin's An American in Paris, Stravinsky's Rite of Spring, Mahler's Symphony No. 10, Schoenberg's Verklärte Nacht, Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6, back through Wagner, Chopin, Schubert, Beethoven, Mozart [...]
Online
1982
3.

Luther and the Reformation [electronic resource]

This program covers the impact of the Reformation on the history of music; the work of Johann Sebastian Bach; the importance of church organs and chorale singing. Music of Buxtehude and Bach is performed by James Galway, Peter Hurford, the Vienna Boys' Choir, Salvation Army Band, Hellmuth Rilling and the Stuttgart Orchestra. Contents include excerpts from: Luther's Ein' Feste Burg; Isaac's Innsbruck, ich muss dich lassen; Schutz's The Lord Jesus Christ, the same night He was betrayed; Buxtehude's Toccata and Fugue in F; Bach's O Welt, ich muss dich lassen, In Dulci Jubilo, Fugue in G minor, Air for the G string from the 3rd Orchestral Suite, Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, Bist du bei mir, Gigue from Partita for Harpsichord, A Musical Offering, St. Matthew Passion, The Passion Chorale.
Online
1982
4.

The Golden Age [electronic resource]

This program covers the wealth of music during the age of Elizabeth I in England and its spread from the Church and the courts to the middle classes; the emergence of opera in Italy and France; the celebration of St. Cecilia; Elizabethan madrigals. Music of Byrd, Purcell, Monteverdi, and Lully is performed by Anthony Rooley and the Consort of Musicke, the Taverners Choir, London, and the Zurich Opera. Contents include excerpts from: Morley's Fire, Fire, My Heart; Marenzio's Dolorous Mournful Cares; Weelkes' As Vesta Was From Latmos Hill Descending; Holburn's The Honeysuckle; Dowland's Mistress Winter's Jump, I Saw My Lady Weep, Sleep Wayward Thoughts, Fine Knacks for Ladies; Byrd's Gaudeamus Omnes; John Bull's Galliard; Gibbons' What Is Our Life, The Silver Swan; Caccini's Amarille M [...]
Online
1982
5.

The Advent of Fashion [electronic resource]

Music written for public performance in concert halls and theaters required composers to keep abreast of popular styles. Music of Handel, Couperin, Scarlatti, and Rameau is performed by the English Bach Festival, Huddersfield Choral Society, American Boychoir, Academy of Ancient Music, and Wexford Opera Festival. Contents include excerpts from: Handel's Zadok the Priest, Music for the Royal Fireworks, Concerto for Organ in D Minor, Orlando, Messiah; Rameau's Nais; Couperin's Deuxieme Ordre; Telemann's Sonata in E Minor; Scarlatti's Sonata in B-Flat Major; John Gay's The Beggar's Opera.
Online
1982
6.

Vienna [electronic resource]

This program covers Mozart in Salzburg; Mozart in Vienna; Mozart's operas examined by Sir Peter Hall; the great Mozart symphonies and the Requiem Mass; and Schubert, his piano works, chamber music, and Lieder. Performers include James Galway, the Vienna Boys' Choir, Jorg Demus, and the Amadeus Quartet. Contents include excerpts from: Mozart's Dies Irae and Lachrymosa from the Requiem, Andante in C Major, Piano Concerto K414, Haffner Serenade, Piano Concerto in F, Don Giovanni, Symphony No. 38 in D ('Prague'), Cosi Fan Tutte (Finale, Act I); Schubert's Seeligkeit, Fruhlingslaube, German Dances, Impromptus and First Waltzes, Quartet in C Minor, and An die Musik.
Online
1982
7.

The Revolutionary [electronic resource]

This program covers Beethoven, the man who changed the course of music and aligned himself with the forces that changed the course of history. Movements or extracts from the Third, Sixth, and Ninth Symphonies, Quartets Opus 18 and 135, Fidelio, the Appassionata are performed by the Los Angeles, Berlin, and Vienna Philharmonics under Giulini, von Karajan, and Bohm. Contents include excerpts from: Quartet Opus 18 No. 1, Symphony No. 3, Fidelio, Symphony No. 6, Quartet Opus 135, Symphony No. 9.
Online
1982
8.

The Romantics [electronic resource]

The Romantic movement-a reaction against the orderliness of 18th-century classicism and 19th-century industrialization-strove above all for self-expression. The Romantics composed for themselves and the new bourgeois audiences that now frequented concert halls and were acquiring pianos for their living rooms. Chopin's A-Flat Polonaise is performed in Chopin's house outside Warsaw, Mendelssohn's Elijah and Brahms' Requiem in the halls where they had their premiere performances. Contents include excerpts from: Chopin's Polonaise in A-Flat, Prelude; Mendelssohn's "Italian" Symphony (Finale), Octet, "He watching over Israel" from Elijah; Schumann's "In the heavenly month of May," Symphony No. 3 ('Rhenish'); Brahms' Lullaby, Symphony No. 2, Ein Deutsches Requiem, Clarinet Quintet; Bruckne [...]
Online
1982
9.

The Mighty Fistful [electronic resource]

Until the 19th century, fashionable Russian audiences preferred Western music. Then came Glinka, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Borodin, Scriabin, and Tchaikovsky. This program covers the distance from folk tradition to the founding of the Russian style of music by Glinka. Performers include James Galway, Osipov's Balalaika Orchestra, and the Kirov, Bolshoi, and Royal Ballets. Contents include excerpts from: Glinka's Russlan and Ludmilla Overture; Tcheshnikov's Let Us Give Prayer; Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov, Coronation Scene; Borodin's Quartet No. 2 in D Major; Rimsky-Korsakov's Flight of the Bumblebee, A Bride for the Czar; Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto, Swan Lake, Symphony No. 6 ('Pathetique'); Scriabin's Prometheus; Stravinsky's The Firebird.
Online
1982
10.

Nationalism and Revolution [electronic resource]

The French Revolution ushered in a century of nationalism and political change throughout Europe; composers identified with causes and expressed them in music. Performances include Berlioz' Requiem, conducted by Leonard Bernstein; Wagner's Meistersinger with the Bayreuth Festival Orchestra; Verdi's Requiem with the La Scala Opera Company. Contents include excerpts from: Berlioz' Requiem; Liszt's Legend, Fantasia on Hungarian Folk Themes; Verdi's "Va pensiero" from Nabucco, "Celeste Aida" and other Aida excerpts, Requiem; Wagner's Tannhauser, Siegfried Idyll, Prelude to Tristan und Isolde, Die Meistersinger.
Online
1982
11.

Land of Our Fathers [electronic resource]

Nationalism soon led to a recognition of the classical value of folksong, and an attempt to express in music the language, landscape, and musical traditions of the composer's own country. Contents include excerpts from: Smetana's Ma Vlast; Dvorak's String Quartet in E-Flat, Symphony No. 9 ('The New World'); Ives' Three Places in New England; Janacek's Katya Kabanova; Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite; de Falla's Homage at the Tomb of Debussy; Vaughan Williams' London Symphony; Kodaly's Hary Janos Suite; Sibelius' Finlandia, Symphony No. 2.
Online
1982
12.

The Turn of the Century [electronic resource]

As we move into the 20th century, music is in transition from Romanticism to Modernism, from self-expression to Realism-or to the attempt to escape from reality to bygone eras. Performers include James Galway and the Vienna Philharmonic under Bernstein, Bohm, and von Karajan. Contents include excerpts from: Puccini's Madama Butterfly; Debussy's Syrinx, La Mer; Mahler's Das Lied von der Erde; Schoenberg's Verklarte Nacht; Wagner's Prelude to Tristan und Isolde; Berg's String Quartet; Richard Strauss' Til Eulenspiegel, Salome; Mahler's Symphony No. 10.
Online
1982
13.

War and Peace [electronic resource]

In the period between the two World Wars, composers sought to express in music the jarring and discordant sense that civilization was giving way to barbarism. During the same time, jazz burst upon the international musical scene. Performers include the Moscow Classical Ballet Company, Maxim Shostakovich conducting his father's Symphony No. 7, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Sir Peter Pears and Galina Vishnevskaya in Britten's War Requiem, and an electric performance of An American in Paris by Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic. Contents include excerpts from: Stravinsky's Rite of Spring, Ragtime; Elgar's Cello Concerto; Satie's Three Waltzes of the Fastidious Dandy; Joplin's Maple Leaf Rag; Hindemith's 1922 Suite for Piano; Milhaud's La Création du monde; Prokofiev's Quintet in G mino [...]
Online
1982
14.

Today and Tomorrow [electronic resource]

Music of our time is harder to assess; we should remember that today's war-horses were in their own time shockingly modern, and that contemporary audiences often spurned those whom we most venerate today. This program presents a broad cross-section of modern music and musical trends, leaving to listeners the guess as to which will be tomorrow's classics. Contents include excerpts from: Lennon and McCartney's When I'm 64; Varese's Ionization; Stravinsky's The Firebird, Rite of Spring, Symphony in C; Copland's El Salon Mexico; Tippett's Double String Concerto; Messiaen's Pentecostal Mass; Stockhausen's Kontakte; Boulez' Le Marteau sans maitre; Berio's A-Ronne; Ligeti's Melodien; Nono's La Fabbrica Illuminata; Henze's El Cimarron; Cage's Improvisations from "Songbooks.
Online
2012
15.

The Renaissance [electronic resource]

This program covers the patronage of the Dukes of Burgundy and the Kings of France, and the continued influence of the Church. It shows how music, like philosophy, moved away from the elaborate formality of the Gothic and, like architecture, sought new and purer forms. Music of Binchois, Ockeghem, Josquin des Pres, Palestrina, de Lassus, Tromboncino, and Gabrieli is performed by the Schutz Choir, Emma Kirkby and the New London Consort. Includes excerpts from: Dufay's Ce Moys de Mai; Binchois' Deuill Angoisseurs; Ockeghem's Requiem Mass; Josquin's Nymphe des Bois, Je Ne Me Puis, and Scaramella; Taverner's Oh Wilhelme, Pastor Bone; Andrea Gabrieli's Ricercare; Palestrina's Aeterna Christi Muneri and Sicut Cervus; Victoria's Domine Non Sum Dignus; two Milan pieces for vihuela; Trombonci [...]
Online
1982
16.

The First Secular Music [electronic resource]

This program proceeds from the early music of the Eastern churches to the establishment of music as part of the Christian liturgy; the influence of Pope Gregory and the first composers for the Church; Notre-Dame de Paris and other religious centers; Leonin, Perotin, Guillaume de Machaut; the birth of secular song; Walther von der Vogelweide, Landini, Dunstable, and Dufay. Includes excerpts from: Traditional Gregorian, Hebrew, and Greek chants; Leonin's Rejoice, O Virgin Mary; Estampie from the Manuscript du Roi; Perotin's Viderunt Omnes; Tempus est iocundum from Carmina Burana; Walther von der Vogelweide, Palestinalied; Machaut, Il m'est avis, Quant je suis mis, Gloria from Notre-Dame Mass; Landini's Questa Fanciulla Amor and L'Alma Mia Piange; Dunstable's Veni Sancte Spiritu; and Du [...]
Online
1982
17.

The Advent of Fashion

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Flutist James Galway discusses how writing music for public performance in concert halls and theatres required composers to keep abreast of popular styles. This is best illustrated by the work of Handel: Zadok the Priest, Concerts for Organ and Orchestra in G minor, Royal Fireworks Music, extracts from Messiah and selections from Couperin, Scarlatti and Rameau.
VHS
1990; 1982
Ivy (By Request)
18.

Vibrations and Pagan Rites

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Flutist James Galway takes the viewer backward through time to demonstrate how ageless and universal is the human impulse to make music, and how logical and natural has been the development of Western music.
VHS
1990; 1982
Ivy (By Request)
19.

The First Secular Music

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Flutist James Galway discusses the development of music from the early music of the Eastern churches to the birth of the secular song. Several individual performers and musical groups present examples.
VHS
1990; 1982
Ivy (By Request)
20.

The Renaissance

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Flutist James Galway discusses the importance of wealthy nobles, kings, and the church as patrons of music. He shows how music moved away from the elaborate formality of the Gothic and found newer and purer forms. Several individual performers and musical groups present examples.
VHS
1990; 1982
Ivy (By Request)