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1.

Jazz and the Art of Teaching

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Teaching has important parallels to improvisational jazz performance. Jazz musicians on the bandstand both play in the moment and communicate constantly with one another and their audience. Like jazz musicians, teachers must know where they are going in a class, but the pathway to that place is never the same, and they need to stay centered in the present moment and be inventively responsive to learners' unique reactions. In this program, celebrated physician-educator Dr. Paul Haidet explores the jazz concept of voice and translates this to the teaching environment. As teachers (of medicine or other subjects), how can we best shape our own voices, deftly deliver the material, communicate in the moment with diverse learners, and carry a class and its themes through to a satifying and [...]
DVD
2015
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
2.

Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

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New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast's new graphic memoir, Can't we talk about something more pleasant? explores universal themes even as it tells the very personal story of her parents' final years. This prizewinning book chronicles in poignant detail the suthor's experience of her elderly parents' journey from independence to dependence and through to their final days. In this Medical Center Hour, Roz Chast presents this sober tale of elder and end-of-life care through her cartoons, but all is lightened and made more comfortable, even comforting, by her inimitable humor.
DVD
2015
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
3.

Unquiet Mind: Living With Bipolar Illness, the Consequences of Public Disclosure of Mental Illness

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Memoir writing is interesting for the process involved as well as for the predictable and not so predictable consequences of the public exposure that follows. Writing a memoir about madness, especially if one is a professor of psychiatry, has additional consequences. Responses to one example, Kay Redfield Jamison's An unquiet mind, published in 1997, were many, varied, and complicated. Some colleagues offered compassion and encouragement, while others were critical or silent. Students and young doctors with their own mental health experience expressed concern about the consequences of seeking treatment or speaking openly with supervisors or professors. Public response ranged from appreciative support to religious and political tirades. In this presentation, Kay Jamison considers the [...]
DVD
2015
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
4.

LBJ's (Not So) Great Society After 50 Years: A (Poor) Health Legacy

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Fifty years ago President Lyndon B. Johnson envisioned a Great Society, an America free from poverty and racial injustice and full of equality of opportunity and social mobility for all. Many legislative planks of his Great society platform--civil and voting rights, educational opportunity, fair housing practices, urban planning, mass transit, and health care --represent what we today consider "social determinants of health." This Medical center hour with bioethicist Erika Blacksher reviews how Americans are faring today in relation to key aspirations of LBJ's Great Society, especially those that bear on health. Americans generally live shorter, less healthy lives than their counterparts in peer nations, and within the U.S. health varies dramatically among social and economic groups [...]
DVD
2015
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
5.

Here One Day: A Film About Mental Illness, Suicide, and Family

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When documentary filmmaker Kathy Leichter moved back into her childhood home after her mother's suicide, she discovered a hidden box of audiotapes. Sixteen years passed before she had the courage to delve into this trove, but there she unearthed what her mother had recorded about every aspect of her life--from the joys and challenges of her marriage to a state senator to her son's estrangement , as well as the highs and lows of living with bipolar disorder. Here one day is Ms. Leichter's emotionally candid film about a woman coping with mental illness, her family relationships, and the ripple effects of her suicide on those she loved. In this Medical center hour, Ms. Leichter offers her extraordinary award-winning film, speaks about the transformative nature of story, and shows how H [...]
DVD
2015
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
6.

Dying in America

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Dying in America is very different now from half a century ago. Before World War II, death usually occurred at home, often with no medical intervention. But with the bioscientific and medical advances that began in the 1950's, death became medicalized. In hospitals, it became possible to extend life. Often, patients were cured who would otherwise have died, but many endured protracted deaths in which suffering from treatment was worse than suffering from their fatal illness. Through the last decades of the 20th century, the medical and legal professions, medical ethicists, and the public began to consider ways to limit treatment, even to hasten death. It became generally accepted that all patients have the right to refuse life-sustaining treatment. Now, five U.S. states recognize phy [...]
DVD
2015
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
7.

The Surprising Collapse of Marijuana Prohibition: What Now?

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Marijuana has had a rocky and peculiar history in the United States. The early history of marijuana prohibition is fairly well known, thanks in part to a classic work on the subject, The Marijuana Conviction, co-authored by Richard J. Bonnie while he was associate director of a commission apppointed by Richard Nixon. In 1972, to the surprise of many, the commission recommended decriminalizing marijuana use, but it also rejected the idea of legalization, expressing major concerns about the public health consequences of doing so. While loosening marijuana laws became a mainstream policy idea through the Ford and Carter admisistrations, in the Reagan White House, a policy of "zero tolerance" took hold and evolved into a new and costly war on all illegal drugs. Millions of marijuana arre [...]
DVD
2015
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
8.

Celebrating Modern Anatomy's Birthday: Andreas Vesalius Turns 500 (1514-2015)

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Andreas Vesalius, long hailed as "the father of modern anatomy," is slipping into oblivion. The likes of Gray's Anatomy (the book), Netter's Atlas, plasticized dissected bodies, and online visible human specimens having eclipsed his splendidly illustrated book, On the Fabric of the Human Body (1543), as our definitive anatomy text. Vesalius's recent 500th birthday anniversary gives us a chance not only to celebrate this Renaissance genius, but also to consider how his accomplishments in the study of human anatomy helped medicine to become "modern."
DVD
2015
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
9.

The Ash and the Fire: Writing About Medicine, the Body, and the Mind

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Acclaimed physician-writer Christine Montross (Body of work, 2007; and Falling into the fire, 2013) discusses how diving deeply into her most challenging patient encounters has led her to the ancient concept of "abiding" as a lost tenet of patient care. A psychiatrist and medical educator, Dr. Montross speaks in defense of repugnance, and encourages physicians and doctors-in-training to acknowlege, rather than suppress the discomforts which naturally arise in the practice of medicine.
DVD
2014
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
10.

Life After Death: The Emotional Impact of Adverse Events on Physicians

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Adverse events and poor patient outcomes occur for all doctors, regardless of subspecialty, regardless of educational and training pedigree, and despite best intentions. Such occurrences often exact a significant and sometimes lasting emotional toll on doctors, even apart from any culpability or potential medicolegal ramifications. In this Medical center hour Dr. Farnaz Gazoni demonstrates that adverse events in clinical care and their impact on physicians have substantial, widespread repercussions affecting quality of care and patient safety. But her research and experience show too that, by simply cultivating awareness of this issue, health care institutions and individual practitioners are taking important first steps toward culture change.
DVD
2014
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
11.

Empathy: An Inquiry

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In this Medical center hour, prize-winning writer Leslie Jamison inquires into the phenomenon of empathy. It may be something more fraught then we often imagine it to be. Empathy isn't just an instinctive reaction but a more complicated blend of intuition and decision. And it's not neccessarily an unequivocal good. It can mislead. It can exhaust. Ms. Jamison draws on her experiences as a standardized patient, working with and observing student doctors getting "trained" in the practice of empathy, as well as her experiences as a journalist, inhabiting a vexed state of empathy for her subjects, to consider a variety of perspectives on what makes for good empathy and what good it can do.
DVD
2014
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
12.

Ebola! the Evolving Epidemic

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"Germs have always traveled. the problem now is they can travel with the speed of a jet plane." So said physician and medical historian Howard Markel in recent days, commenting on the spread of Ebola outside West Africa. This Medical center hour takes stock of the rapidly evolving Ebola epidemic and the concomitant rise in global health security concerns. What is known of this unusual virus and the life-threatening hemorrhagic fever it triggers? How are sociopolitical and cultural conditions and healthcare infrastructural inadequacies in West Africia and elsewhere hindering medical and public health response? How are governmental and health care institutions in the U.S. responding as cases erupt outside West Africia? And, looking ahead, what are the prospects for vaccine development [...]
DVD
2014
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
13.

Landscapes of Longevity: Healthy Aging Across the World

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In summer 2013, UVA landscape architecture graduate students Harriett Jameson and Asa Eslocker travelled to Sardinia, Okinawa, and Loma Linda, California, three landscapes with the highest life expectancy in the world, to explore these places' physical, spatial, and material qualities-topography, plant communitites,urban form-and also the personal attachments that seniors in these sites have to their cultural landscapes. The people in these locales have long been studied for their genetics, diets, and recreation habits. But until Ms. Jameson and Mr. Eslocker arrived, no one had inquired into or demonstrated in these settings the critical role of place in healthy longevity. Through study of these distinctive landscapes and the personal stories of elderly residents, the pair arrived at [...]
DVD
2014
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
14.

Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in Pursuit of Health

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Growing enthusiasm in medicine and in the population at large for early diagnosis has engaged many doctors in a systematic search for abnormalitites in persons who are well. While physicians, patients, and the press tend to focus on the potential benefits, Dr. H. Gilbert Welch in his work has exposed the often-ignored harm associated with this practice: overdiagnosis. Diagnoses of a great many conditions, including high blood pressure, osteoporosis, diabetes (and prediabetes), and even cancer, have skyrocketed in recent years, yet many individuals so labeled are destined never to develop symptoms, much less die, from their conditions. They are overdiagnosed. And overdiagnosed patients as Dr. Welch points out in the Medical Center Hour, cannot benefit from treatment since there is no [...]
DVD
2014
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
15.

Pushing the Interprofessional Education Envelope

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Over the last decade, the number of reports urging American universities to expose their health professional students to interprofessional education (IPE), so that those who will practice together may learn together, has exceeded the number of actual IPE experiences in most nursing and medical students' entire curricula. In 2013, strong new calls for interprofessional education came from the Institute of Medicine and the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation. What does this mean for the University of Virginia's Schools of Nursing and Medicine, our students, our health systems, and the patients and families we serve? If we were to push the envelope on IPE, where might we best focus our efforts? How might we lead in preparing the next generation of nurses and physicians for better collaboration a [...]
DVD
2014
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
16.

Constructing for Health: Lessons From the Vienna Project

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During the enlightenment, from 1765, the Habsburg Empire capital of Vienna underwent massive transformations in urban design and appearance, from the introduction of sewer systems and streetlights to urbanization of suburbs and construction of public facilities, including parks, all guided by principles we now consider fundamental to creating healthy, green, livable cities. Habsburg Emperor Joseph II (1780-1790), a reformer with almost utopian (and quite Jeffersonian) ideas about architecture and health, extended these massive changes by contructing Vienna's medical district, including the general hospital, the military hospital, an institute for the mentally ill, and the medical-surgical military academy Josephinum. What does it mean to "construct for health" in designing cities and [...]
DVD
2014
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
17.

Taking Good Care of Our Transgender Teens

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At a time when lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals enjoy ever greater social acceptance and legal protection, transgender teens and young adults still face challenges on many fronts. Simply negotiating adolescence isn't easy, and gender identity issues can complicate matters. Health care for transgender youth is in transition, as the population becomes better understood. In this Medical Center Hour, a panel of pediatricians makes the case for increased cultural competency in medicine and society alike to help give transgender teens a safe medical home and help them to lead satisfying, successful lives.
DVD
2014
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
18.

The Play's the Thing: Teaching Leadership With the Creative Arts

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Despite their reliance on technical knowledge that requires mastery, medicine, law, and business are all deeply human professions. Medicine is more than body repair, law more than legal systems, business more than the physics of money. While professional education neccessarily must be at the cutting edge of technical expertise, it must remember too the human nature-including the values, emotions, and richly complicated lives-of professionals and professional organizations. In this Medical Center Hour, Professor Ed Freeman from UVA's Darden School of Business demonstrates how the creative arts and humanities can be embedded in professional education to address and actively teach ethical conduct in professional life and leadership of complex professional organizations. What lessons in [...]
DVD
2014
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
19.

The Political Science of Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Moral Defense of the DSM

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The Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM) is perhaps the most contested document in American medicine, vital for the organization and funding of psychiatric research and mental health care, yet perennially criticized both from within and behond the mental health community. Heated debate accompanied the 2013 publication of the manual's fifth edition, DSM-5. Critics charged that the new edition masks political interests (e.g. interests of psychiatrists and pharmaceutical companies) under the guise of science at patients' expense. DSM-5 defenders championed the inclusiveness and transparency of the review process and evidence-base behind the manual's diagnostic decisions. In this Medical center hour, psychiatrist and theologian Warren Kinghorn argues for a mediatin [...]
DVD
2014
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
20.

Healing in Medicine: Lessons From Clinicians and Patients

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At a time of sweeping transitions in health care, medical students and young physicians are eager for guidance as to how best to apply their knowledge and skills in caring for patients. In clinical settings, and especially in primary care, who might be the best role models for young trainees to emulate? What skills and traits do the best clinicians use to create healing relationships with patients? How do clinicians become "healers" -that is, practitioners effective in making the patient-professional relationship itself have active therapeutic potential? Professor Larry Churchill and colleagues at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine have examined these matters, interviewing both clinicians and patients on the vital question of what actually makes for a therapeutic encounter, eve [...]
DVD
2014
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)