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1.

Homelessness and Poor in America: Implications for Health and Health Care

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Kim Hopper, Ph.D. (Research Scientist, Center for the Study of Issues in Public Mental Health, Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, New York; and Adjunct Professor, School of Law, and Lecturer, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York) discussed the scale and methods for counting the homeless, models for homeless risk, types of health problems and street deaths, etc. Dr. Hopper stressed the real problem of homelessness as resting with the underlying structures of getting basic needs met, especially in the area of housing. Barbara Ehrenreich, Ph.D. (Social Critic and Author of "Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America (2002), Charlottesville, Virginia) illustrated by her lived examples, the difficulties of surviving [...]
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
2.

The Legacy of Nancy Cruzan

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William Colby, the Cruzan family lawyer and author of the book Long goodbye, discussed the Nancy Cruzan case which represents the intersection of law, medicine, and technology. He talked about her as a person.
VHS
2004
Ivy (By Request)
3.

Adult Perspectives on Childhood Experience With Domestic Homicide

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Parker discussed a longitudinal study she and Steeves are conducting, interviewing adults whose parents killed another parent when they were children. Steeves described the case study of one family with 5 children, who were split apart after the killing of a parent. Adams described her personal experience of losing her mother to domestic violence.
VHS
2004
Ivy (By Request)
4.

Race-Based Therapeutics

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Ruth Gaare Bernheim, J.D., M.P.H. (Associate Professor of Public Health Sciences; Director, Division of Public Health Policy and Practice, Department of Public Health Sciences and Associate Director, Institute for Practical Ethics, University of Virginia) introduced the new masters program in public health at the University of Virginia and the first speaker. M. Gregg Bloche, J.D., M.D. (Professor of Law, Georgetown University School of Law and Visiting Professor of Law, UCLA) described a frame work for describing medical advances with technological change driven by basic and clinical reseach along with economic factors and the marketing of health and health care in terms of race. Dr. Bloche illustrated this framework with the FDA approved BiDil used to treat heart failure in self-ide [...]
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
5.

Reframing Disability: New Ways of Seeing and Representing Disability

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Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Ph.D. (Associate Professor, Department of Women's Studies, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia) described and contextualized images of disability that have been represented in the modern Western world and United States via various ocular means for entertainment (human exhibition), political commentary and medical illustration. Dr. Garland-Thomson visually presented several organized sets of images: the Hottentot Venus, Maximo and Bartolo, the Aztec Twins, Julia Pastrana, Millie and Christine, "armless wonders," injured workers, wounded veterans, and charity/commercial posters like the March of Dimes. Lastly, Dr. Garland-Thomson showed works of art that incorporated disabilities such as that created by Doug Auld, Chris Rush, and Riva Lehrer. Walter S.. Davi [...]
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
6.

End of Life Care for the Poor

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Gregory Gramelspacher, M.D. (Associate Professor of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana) described the needs of the dying poor and the place of philanthropy. He read a poem by Jack Gilbert entitled, "By small and small: midnight to 4 a.m." to illustrate the importance of "presence" and communication with the dying person and their family. Dr. Gramelspacher postulated that good palliative care is preventive ethics consultation in practice. Through faces and stories of real people, Dr. Gramelspacher paints the picture of "dying well" both in Indianapolis and in Kenya. Rebecca Dillingham, M.D. (Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases and Internal Medicine, University of Virginia) shares her ambivalent thoughts regarding the dying [...]
DVDOnline
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
7.

Improvisation: What Does It Have to Do With Practicing Medicine?

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Stephen Nachmanovitch, Ph.D. (violinist, author, computer artist, and educator; owner of Free Play Productions, Charlottesville, Virginia ) began by playing an improvisational piece with Loren Ludwig (Graduate Student, McIntire School of Music, University of Virginia) who played the viola da gamba. Dr. Nachmanovitch described the similarities between medicine (physician patient interaction)/science and art and the process of creativity and improvisation which involves intense listening, openness, presence and communication. He concluded by stating that both medicine/science and art involve data gathering and experimentation which leads to the discovery of what works.
DVD
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
8.

Conscientious Refusals by Health Professionals: Should There Be Limits?

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Robin Fretwell Wilson, J.D. (Visiting Professor of Law, Washington and Lee University Lexington, Virginia and Professor of Law, University of Maryland School of Law, Baltimore, Maryland) described and illustrated court cases that dealt with the conflicts between professional responsibilities and personal beliefs. Specifically Robin addressed: (1) The fact that both patients and providers have rights and expectations in a relationship; (2) Questions concerning whose rights are more important?; and (3) Debates concerning issues of health care access. Theresa S. Drought, Ph.D., R.N. (Assistant Professor of Nursing, University of Virginia) explored the ethical care of patients as seen in the nursing process and in the Nursing Code of Ethics. Daniel G. Larriviere, M.D., J.D. (Assistant [...]
DVD
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
9.

The Meaning of "Everything": Responding to Patient Requests for Aggressive Treatment at the End of Life

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James A. Tulsky, M.D. (Director, Center for Palliative Care and Associate Professor of Medicine and Nursing; Senior Fellow, Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University School Medicine) discussed the meaning of "everything" as heard in statements such as, "You are going to do everything for my Father, are'nt you?" Additionally, Dr. Tulsky reviewed the past decade of studies on communication, identified and listed barriers to change; and provided solutions to address requests that imply or directly ask for "everything" to be done to keep a person alive. Dr. Tulsky presented the NURSE Model of name, understand, respect, support, and explore the senstive situation of "doing everything" and almost certain impending death.
DVDOnline
2006
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
10.

Spiritual Issues in the Care of the Dying

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Daniel P. Sulmasy, O.F.M., M.D., Ph.D. (Sisters of Charity Chair in Ethics and Chair, John J. Conley Department of Ethics, St. Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center, Manhattan, and Professor of Medicine and Director, Bioethics Institute, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York) addressed three major questions that the hearing and thinking dying person is confronted with: value/dignity, meaning/hope, and relationship/reconciliation/closure. Dr. Sulmasy discussed in detail the meanings of these words/concepts, a need for consistency in naming/applying these moral words in discourse and writing, and where and how spirituality fits in with these three questions and the context of dying and what it means to be human.
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
11.

Words That Harm, Words That Heal

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Susanna E. Bedell, M.D. (Lown Cardiovascular Center and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School) addressed the types of verbal and written communication that impacts good/healing communication between doctors and patients. Dr. Bedell described in depth the influences of the "letter of condolence" for both the deceased person's loved ones as well as for the physician him/herself. Eugene C. Corbett, M.D. (Division of General Medicine, Geriatrics and Palliative Care, University of Virginia) responded with comments on "medicine as craft," the importance of continuity of care, how to teach effective interviewing, the importance of the words that patients use with physicians, and the importance of words chosen for the closure of any situation.
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
12.

The Conquest of Pellagra

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Charles S. Bryan, M.D., MACP (University of South Carolina School of Medicine) presented the case that many people often contribute to medical discoveries, but one person is usually credited who comes along at a more propitious time. Dr. Bryan cites examples such as HIV/AIDS, Yellow Fever, and Pellagra. The case of pellagra is discussed at length as are the names Cesare Lombroso, George H. Searcy, James Woods Babcock, and Joseph Goldberger.
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
13.

Richard Selzer's "Follow Your Heart" [Videorecording]: A Medical Readers' Theater Presentation

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The University of Virginia Medical Students present a reader's theatre production of surgeon Richard Selzer's story, "Follow Your Heart," adapted by Ann Bean. The play entails human emotions following an organ donation. Visiting Professor, Todd Savitt (Ph.D., Professor of Medical Humanities, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina), leads audience discussion after the play.
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
14.

The Political Life of Medicare

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Jonathan Oberlander, Ph.D. (Department of Social Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) provided an "historical-political tour" of the development of Medicare and its original purposes. Dr. Oberlander ended with his speculations concerning the current "midlife" crisis regarding Medicare and the current political arena. William Plonk, M.D. (Department of Internal Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville) entitled his talk, "Why care about Medicare politics?" and he described how Medicare determines what our nation spends money on, what physicians get paid, what care patients recieve, and what standard of medical care is given.
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
15.

The Honest Doctor and the Hopeful Patient

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David Schiff, M.D. (Department of Neurology, University of Virginia) outlined the difficult issues surrounding the disclosure of "bad news" and the need for creating a right setting and manner. David M. Bailey, Musician (Earlysville, Virginia) who was diagnosed with cancer ten years ago, intertwined his music (guitar and singing) along with his thoughts, experience, and lessons of being hopeful, discovering what hope is and is not, and asking questions such as "Why me?" and "What do I do now?"
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
16.

Blues Biology

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Musician Corey Harris discusses the history of blues and describes how this music has been used to help alleviate human pain and illness. He sings and plays several musical selections during his presentation. Music performed includes: High fever blues, C. C. pill blues, Love is more precious than gold, Cat fish blues, and Didn't by Lord deliver David?
VHS
2005
Ivy (By Request)
17.

Homeless and Poor in America: Implications for Health and Health Care

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Dr. Hopper discussed methods for counting the homeless, types of health problems they encounter, etc. He stressed that the real problem was poverty, the underlying structure of getting basic needs met, especially in the area of housing. Ms. Ehrenreich discussed her experiences of trying to live on low wages while researching her book, Nickel and dimed, and the experiences of her co-workers during that period, especially concerning housing and health care.
VHS
2005
Ivy (By Request)
18.

Communicating Evidence for Informed Decision Making

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Ronald Epsten, M.D. (Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry) described the importance of communicating medical information. Dr. Epstein developed five points: (1) Information transfers into an ethical act, (2) Information transfer is inefficient with little concordance, (3) Information needs to be evidence-based , (4) Information is not enough and needs interpretation, and (5) Information transfer is a mutual responsibility between physician and patient. David Slawson, M.D. (Department of Family Medicine, University of Virginia) discussed and defined information mastery and its components: usefulness, validity, relevance, patient oriented evidence versus disease oriented evidence, and two important tools (a first aler [...]
DVD
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
19.

Dream Anatomies: The Cultural Meaning of Anatomical Representation

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Michael Sappol, Ph.D. (Curator-Historian, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland) discussed the development of anatomical representation from imaginative and fictious in the 16th and 17th centuries to the more present times in which it is more precise and realistic. Virginia Taylor Lyons, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor of Medical Education, Department of Cell Biology, University of Virginia) talked about the transitions of dissection from public to private and then beoming more public again through such initiatives as the National Library of Medicine's "The Visible Human Project." Both speakers described our fascination with the body and its anatomical representation for study, art, and entertainment.
DVDOnline
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
20.

Can We Teach Humanism in Medicine?

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Daniel M. Becker, M.D., M.P.H., M.F.A. (Professor of Medicine and Public Health Sciences and Director, Center for Humanism in Medicine) introduced the panel of speakers and the Center for Humanism. Mark J. Mendelsohn, M.D. (Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Virginia) defined humanism and gave some examples of its presence in the educational process. Eugene F. (Chip) Foley, M.D. (Associate Professor of Surgery, University of Virginia) described what humanism is and what it does and the importance of modeling humanistic behavior. Christine M. Peterson, M.D. (Director of Gynecology, Department of Student Health, Associate Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Assistant Dean for Medical Education, University of Virginia) presented a summary of key concepts and highligh [...]
DVDOnline
2005
Health Sciences (Service Desk)