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1.

Family Violence

Dr. Astrid Heger, Director of the Violence Intervention Program at L.A. County-USC Medical Center, talks about abused women who come into her practice. Dr. Heger explains that many of them come not so much to protect themselves, but to protect their children.
Online
2015; 2011
2.

Decisions and Uncertainty

Nobel Prize winning professor of psychology Daniel Kahneman talks about the way people make decisions in the face of uncertainty. Dr. Kahneman explains that gambles have traditionally been described in terms of how much money will be won or lost, depending on the outcome of the gambling decision. He adds that this analysis has its origins in utility theory, which was developed in the 18th century.
Online
2015; 2011
3.

Stroke and Depression

Dr. Andrew Leuchter, Director of Adult Psychiatry at UCLA, talks about research that helps identify which patients are at highest risk for depression after a stroke. Dr. Leuchter explains that, ". . . It appears that strokes in the frontal portions of the brain, particularly in the left frontal portion, affecting some of the deeper structures in the left frontal lobe, put a patient at highest risk for having a depressive episode after a stroke."
Online
2015; 2011
4.

Suicide and Psychiatric Disorders

Professor of psychiatry and author Kay Redfield Jamison talks about the irrefutable link between psychiatric disorders and suicide, especially among young people.
Online
2015; 2011
5.

Psychology of Prediction, the

Nobel Prize winning professor of psychology Daniel Kahneman talks about his experience working for the Israeli armed forces, trying to identify military personnel who had the leadership skills necessary to become officers. Dr. Kahneman explains that some of what he learned during this period would find its way into his work many years later.
Online
2015; 2011
6.

Harm Avoidance (Part One)

Dean Hamer, Director of the Gene Structure and Regulation Unit at the National Cancer Institute, talks about harm avoidance, which he explains is the opposite of novelty seeking. In the words of Dr. Hamer, people who are harm avoidant see the world, "...through dark colored glasses...sort of like getting up on the wrong side of the bed every morning."
Online
2015; 2011
7.

Acquisition of Biases, the

Social psychologist Mahzarin Banaji explains that prejudice is something that is learned, not something with which we're born. The good news, according to Dr. Banaji, is that we can change our thinking. "It's part of ordinary thinking, ordinary cognition...becoming aware of it should lead us to imagine changes in our behavior, much as we might do...for...a physical problem.:"
Online
2015; 2011
8.

Recognizing Depression

Dr. Andrew Leuchter, Director of Adult Psychiatry at UCLA, talks about the differences between what he calls, ". . . normal ups and downs," and depression. Dr. Leuchter says that when someone is down for weeks at a time, ". . . that's when we start to think of somebody as, not just being down but, being depressed and needing treatment."
Online
2015; 2011
9.

Depression and the Brain

Dr. Andrew Leuchter, Director of Adult Psychiatry at UCLA, talks about brain-mapping and other techniques for looking into the brain that may predict whether a patient suffering from depression is going to benefit from a particular treatment that's being used.
Online
2015; 2011
10.

Schizophrenia and the Brain

Dr. Andrew Leuchter, Director of Adult Psychiatry at UCLA, talks about studies showing distinctive features in the brains and brain function of many schizophrenic patients.
Online
2015; 2011
11.

Exuberance and Intellectual Curiosity

Professor of psychiatry and author Kay Redfield Jamison talks about the link between exuberance and curiosity. ". . . One of the endearing qualities of exuberance," Dr. Jamison notes, ". . . is that people are able to entertain themselves almost endlessly by asking questions."
Online
2015; 2011
12.

Domestic Violence: A Global Perspective

Dr. Astrid Heger, Director of the Violence Intervention Program at L.A. County-USC Medical Center, talks about efforts underway globally to stem the tide of domestic violence, particularly when children are the targets.
Online
2015; 2011
13.

Helping Someone Who's Suicidal

Professor of psychiatry and author Kay Redfield Jamison makes a number of suggestions about what to do if someone is talking about suicide or appears to be suicidal. "Just be direct," Dr. Jamison advises. "Talk openly in a practical, down to earth manner."
Online
2015; 2011
14.

Mental Retardation and Genetics

Dean Hamer, Director of the Gene Structure and Regulation Unit at the National Cancer Institute, talks about the role genetics plays in many forms of mental retardation. In the case of PKU, a type of retardation that's caused by an enzyme deficiency, Dr. Hamer reports that genetics has identified the source of the problem (which turns out to have a very simple solution).
Online
2015; 2011
15.

Bipolar Disorder

Dr. Andrew Leuchter, Director of Adult Psychiatry at UCLA, talks about bipolar disorder, explaining the cyclical, up and down nature of the illness. Dr. Leuchter notes that it tends to run in families, then discusses the use of mood stabilizers like Lithium to treat bipolar disorder, as well as other medications also commonly used for the treatment of seizures.
Online
2015; 2011
16.

Support From Colleagues

Professor of psychiatry and author Kay Redfield Jamison explains that she has had the full support of her colleagues at both Johns Hopkins and UCLA. She adds, however, that some people are occasionally condescending and treat her differently. "It's a little ungluing at times," Dr. Jamison acknowledges, "...but I think for the most part, people have been really quite wonderful."
Online
2015; 2011
17.

Causes of Violence

Dr. Astrid Heger, Director of the Violence Intervention Program at L.A. County-USC Medical Center, talks about what she calls, ". . . the variety of forces (that) create the fertile ground. . . " on which individuals act out violently against others. Among the forces Dr. Heger cites are inner city poverty, the disintegration of the family and what she calls the "epidemic" of violence depicted in the media.
Online
2015; 2011
18.

Regulating Our Emotions

Psychologist and author Paul Ekman talks about the difficulty of trying to control or regulate one's emotions. "For some people, it'll be easier to achieve," Dr. Ekman says, "because nature gave them more of a gap between impulse and action. It's a longer, gradual onset time."
Online
2015; 2011
19.

Serotonin

Dean Hamer, Director of the Gene Structure and Regulation Unit at the National Cancer Institute, talks about the chemical serotonin and the role it plays in the brain. As it turns out, harm avoidance is controlled by serotonin. Unfortunately, this chemical also makes people feel depressed and pessimistic. Dr. Hamer explains that Prozac works by inhibiting serotonin transport.
Online
2015; 2011
20.

Violence as a Health Risk

Dr. Astrid Heger, Director of the Violence Intervention Program at L.A. County-USC Medical Center, talks about the scale of violence in the United States. Dr. Heger reports that violence is the leading single cause of trauma to women between the ages of fifteen and forty-four, and the leading cause of death among Black adolescents.
Online
2015; 2011