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Legends of Air Power
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1.

Chuck Yeager

Brigadier General Charles Elwood Yeager - World War II ace and the man who broke the sound barrier as depicted in screen classic "The Right Stuff." Chuck Yeager has had a bigger than life career, always poised on the edge of the envelope. He broke the sound barrier flying "G- Chuck Yeager -lamorous Glennis," has won nearly every aviation award, was awarded a peacetime Medal of Honor and was the youngest man enshrined in the Aviation Hall of Fame. An aviator with "the Right Stuff," Chuck Yeager is a true Legend of Airpower.
Online
2017; 1999
2.

Robert Morgan

As a youth, Robert Morgan was a sweet-talking ladies' man who rubbed elbows with the Vanderbilts. But WWII changed this lothario into a combat soldier- as pilot of the famed Memphis Belle, Morgan oversaw a crew that flew a successful 25 missions without losing a single member.
Online
2017; 2001
3.

Legends of Air Power: John Boyd

John Boyd was known as “Forty-Second Boyd” throughout the Air Force because of his promise to beat anyone in simulated air-to-air combat in forty seconds or less. He was taken up on his offer many times and never lost. Boyd turned his natural combat skills into teaching tools for his fellow pilots, coining his famous Energy-Maneuverability Theory, which completely changed the way fighter pilots fought. His theory was even employed in the future design of aircraft, allowing manufacturers to design planes that had great maneuverability. His theories changed tactical fighting forever.
Online
2017; 2003
4.

David Lee "Tex" Hill

David Lee "Tex" Hill was recruited to the American Volunteer Group, the group known as the Flying Tigers, in 1941. Under the leadership of General Claire Chennault, Hill was one of the top aces in the unit. After the deactivation of the Flying Tigers, Hill went on to fight with the 23rd Fighter Group, as well as the 75th Fighter Group. Throughout his career, he destroyed 18 plus enemy aircraft, one of them being the first Zero shot down by a P-51. He continued to fight through the end of WWII and in 1946, he joined the Air National Guard as the youngest Brigadier General in the service's history.
Online
2017; 2003
5.

Chuck Horner

General Charles A. Horner - Vietnam War Veteran and the commander of 9th Air Force at Shaw AFB, SC who took his command to the desert in August of 1990. Chuck Horner commanded the largest, most accurate and effective air war in history. As Air Boss of operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, General Horner built an allied air force the likes of which had never been seen before and planned the most devastating month of air attacks ever. The modern air commander, General Horner is a true Legend of Airpower.
Online
2017; 1999
6.

Francis Gary Powers

In 1960, Francis Gary Powers made headlines as the first U-2 pilot to be shot down. Captured in Russia, his safe return was demanded by the United States. Instead, the Russians sentenced him to ten years in prison, beginning the "U-2 Incident" and heightening Cold War tensions.
Online
2017; 2001
7.

James Stockdale

James Stockdale spent his time as a prisoner of war in Vietnam defying orders and doing everything in his power to stay true to his country. Stockdale remains one of the most highly decorated officers in the United States Navy, leading the U.S air squadron in the Gulf of Tonkin and earning 26 personal combat decorations, including four Silver Star medals. When his A-4 SkyRaider was hit by anti-aircraft fire, he was forced to eject from the aircraft and was taken prisoner upon landing. Stockdale spent the next seven years as a P.O.W., doing everything from beating himself up to avoid being paraded in public, to slitting his own wrists to show he would rather die than talk. Released in 1973, he received the Congressional Medal of Honor in 1976.
Online
2017; 2003
8.

Jimmy Stewart

Brigadier General James Stewart - actor, warrior, and a great American. He was America's leading man who wanted to serve his country during World War II. Jimmy Stewart was too thin to meet the Army Air Corps weight standards and stuffed himself for two days to just barely meet the standard. As a B-24 pilot, he built a reputation as a solid combat commander. He was involved with the Air Force and aviation for the rest of his life, retiring as a Brigadier General in the Air Force Reserve. Jimmy Stewart is a true Legend of Airpower.
Online
2017; 1999
9.

Russ Dougherty

General Russell E. Dougherty - Career officer who - Russ Dougherty -entered the Army Air Corps during World War II. A judge advocate in the late 1940s, he left the legal world to fly bombers and refuelers. A planner in the joint arena for several tours, Russ Dougherty became the Commander-In-Chief of Strategic Air Command in 1974. During the cold war, Dougherty commanded the most lethal nuclear arsenal in the world. Russ Dougherty is a true Legend of Airpower.
Online
2017; 1999
10.

Glenn H. Curtiss

Glenn Curtiss, an aviation pioneer, started out building gasoline engines and eventually went on to build his own aircraft company. Named the "fastest man on Earth" in 1907, when his motorcycle set a speed record of 136.3 miles per hour, Curtiss began constructing engines for airships. The first U.S. Army aircraft, was powered by a Curtiss engine. Curtiss aircrafts were present at many firsts in the history of aviation. Curtiss' friendly rivalry with the Wright brothers ended when the two aircraft manufacturers merged in 1929, to become the Curtiss-Wright Corporation.
Online
2017; 2003
11.

Lorraine Zilner Rodgers

Lorraine Zilner Rodgers was a member of The Women Airforce Service Pilots, known as the WASP, the first group of women pilots to serve the United States Army Air Force in WWII. Out of 25,000 women who applied to the program, Rodgers was one out of 1830 who were accepted. Given the task of ferrying aircraft across the country, to allow the men to be available for combat, Rodgers often had to deal with the stigma of being a woman pilot. The WASP did everything the men did with equal ability, but lacked the equality of full military benefits. After many years of fighting for military recognition, Rodgers and her fellow female pilots received their veteran status on March 8, 1979 and cemented their roles in WWII, as well as the history of aviation.
Online
2017; 2003
12.

George McGovern

George McGovern has spent a large portion of his life in the political arena, holding office as U.S. Congressman for South Dakota for 22 years, as well as running as the Democratic presidential nominee in 1972. However, it is his outstanding military career that makes him a true Legend of Air Power. McGovern flew 35 combat missions as a B-24 bomber pilot. As the subject of historian Stephen Ambrose' book The Wild Blue, it is apparent just how much responsibility was heaped on such a young man. His bravery in WWII earned him the Distinguish Service Cross. Ambrose once remarked that "McGovern is one of the greatest patriots I know".
Online
2017; 2003
13.

Carl "Tooey" Spaatz

Carl "Tooey" Spaatz is one of the genuine characters of American aviation. In the wild and woolly days of flight, he was a guitar-strumming free spirit who often offended the military establishment. But over the course of his career, Spaatz did as much to shape the modern Air Force as any other single person. He trained most of the American pilots who fought in WWI, pioneered air-to-air refueling, and his command of WWII's strategic air forces forever changed the way war is fought. When he retired, President Eisenhower paid tribute to him saying that Tooey Spaatz had never been wrong.
Online
2017; 2001
14.

Tommy McGuire

America's number two all-time ace, behind his good friend and rival Richard Bong, Thomas McGuire was born in Ridgewood, NJ in 1920. Although he only flew two years of combat in World War II, he was awarded America's highest awards, including the Congressional Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross, six Distinguished Flying Crosses, three Silver Stars, three Purple Hearts, 14 Air Medals and many others. During the final days of the war, McGuire was killed while saving the life of a wingman.
Online
2017; 2003
15.

Kelly Johnson

Joining Lockheed as a tool designer, Kelly Johnson became one of America's foremost aircraft designers. He developed more than 40 aircraft, from the U-2 to the F-104, and was the head of Lockheed's advanced development projects, known as the "Skunk Works." When he retired in 1975, this tool designer had become Lockheed's Senior Vice President.
Online
2017; 2001
16.

James Lovell

He grew up fascinated by rockets, but his family couldn't afford to send him to the elite schools that taught rocketry. Jim Lovell went instead to the Naval Academy, becoming a fighter pilot before joining the space program. Lovell became a household name when an oxygen tank on Apollo 13 exploded on the way to the moon. But it was his never-say-die attitude that helped bring Lovell and his men back to Earth.
Online
2017; 2003
17.

Duke Cunningham

Commander Randall Cunningham - Vietnam fighter ace and the pilot the movie Top Gun is based on. A Vietnam War volunteer, "Duke" Cunningham joined the Navy to do his part. He didn't know that he would make his first air kill in January of 1972 and would become the first ace of the war by May of the same year. The commander of the Navy's Top Gun School before he retired, "Duke" was then elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1990. Always an aviator, he flies each of the Navy's aircraft before approving funding. "Duke" Cunningham is a true Legend of Airpower.
Online
2017; 1999
18.

John McCain

He was the son and grandson of 4-star generals, but John McCain's fame doesn't come from his impressive heritage. Instead, it's the courage he showed while a POW in Vietnam that made McCain a household name. From flying A-4s to running for the President of the Untied States, John McCain bears the mark of a true Legend.
Online
2017; 2001
19.

Paul Tibbets

He had his first airplane ride at 12, and from then on he was hooked on flying. Paul Tibbets flew 25 missions in B-17s, including the first American Flying Fortress raid against occupied Europe. But Tibbets gained his fame-and notoriety-on August 6, 1945. On that day, the Enola Gay lifted off North Field with Tibbets and his crew en route to Hiroshima. At 9:15 am the world's first atomic bomb exploded, and the course of history was forever changed.
Online
2017; 2003
20.

Richard Bong

Richard Bong was the top scoring ace of WWII, shooting down 40 enemy aircraft. He began flying his P-38 in the Pacific Theater in late 1942 and had already surpassed Eddie Rickenbacker's 26 kills by April of 1943. Bong achieved his 40th and final kill in 1944. He went on to become a test pilot of jet fighters, but died tragically on a routine flight when his P-80 malfunctioned after takeoff, on the same day the first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima.
Online
2017; 2003