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John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture
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1.

Healing Arts: In the Hospital, in the Hands

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Tina Mullen, M. F. A. (Director, Shands Arts in Medicine, Shands Healthcare at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida) presented the twenty year history and development of the Shands Arts in Medicine Healthcare Program. Ms. Mullen described their guiding principles and features such as: artists in residence; visiting artists; student and community volunteers; partnerships; and staff, student and community engagements. Lauren Catlett, B.A. (Co-Curator, "Shared Doings and Sayings," School of Architecture, University of Virginia) described and presented her work on "Shared Doings and Sayings," a project that brought art to persons residing in Charlottesville, Virginia who have dementia. This project enabled these persons with dementia to express themselves and be aware of and [...]
DVDOnline
2010
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
2.

The Deadly Dinner Party: Doctor as Detective

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Jonathan A. Edlow, M.D., FACEP (Vice Chair and Attending Physician in Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, and Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts) having been inspired by his family's experiences with Lyme Disease and the mysteries of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, shared his fascination with epidemiological methods, medical detective work, and profiling mystery cases. Dr. Edlow is the author of "The Deadly Dinner Party: and Other Medical Detective Stories." He introduced several of these mystery cases, which included: "The deadly dinner party," The baby and the bathwater," "Monday morning fever," "A study in scarlet," "The case of the overly hot honeymoon," and "The case of the unhealthy health food."
DVDOnline
2010
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
3.

A Critic Looks at Writing About Illness and Doctoring 2010: (The Quantity! the Quality! How to Make Sense of It All?)

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Abigail D. Zuger, M.D. (Senior Attending Physician, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center; Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons; and medical columnist for "The New York Times," New York City, New York) presented the dilemmas involved in reading and promoting books in a growing genre that she called "the illness memoirs." Dr. Zuger explored various reasons leading patients and doctors to write, mused about what readers read, and suggested obligations that writers have to readers and readers have to writers. To illustrate these points Dr. Zuger read composite samples of books and essays that she has encountered over the years as medical columnist for "The New York Times."
DVD
2010
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
4.

What's Wrong With Me?: The Hypochondriac, Uncertainty, and Anxiety in Medicine

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Catherine Belling, Ph.D. (Medical Humanities and Bioethics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois) opened her talk with a slide containing a picture of the actor, Woody Allen. She framed her discussion with questions probing why people see hypocondriacs as funny. Dr. Belling traced recent history and personalities such as Alistair Cooke, Gene Weingarten, John Diamond, Jeremy Stangroom, Jerome Groopman, and Arthur J. Barsky, etc. to develop a definition and understanding of the phenomena of hypochondria in life and literature.
DVDOnline
2010
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
5.

Is Empathy in Clinical Practice Possible?

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Jane Macnaughton, M.B.Ch.B., Ph. D. (Professor of Medical Humanities and Co-Director, Centre for Medical Humanities, and Deputy Head, School of Medicine and Health, Durham, Durham, United Kingdom) explored the efficacy and potential dangers of utilizing empathy in clinical practice. Dr. Macnaughton traced the understanding and use of empathy, person-centered therapy, and the dialogic principle ("I and Thou") via the writings of Carl Rodgers and Martin Buber. She also illustrated the experience of provoked empathy or imaginative insight by fiction writers such as Sally Vickers ("The Other Side of You") and Sylvia Plath ("The Bell Jar"). Margaret E. Mohrmann, M.D., Ph. D. (Kornfeld Professor of Biomedical Ethics and Director, Programs in Biomedical Ethics, Center for Biomedical Ethic [...]
DVDOnline
2010
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
6.

"What Do You Mean 'He's Dying'?": Mortality, the Goals of Medicine, and a Taxonomy of Serious Illness

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Despite great progress in recent decades, caring for persons as they near the end of life remains problematic: physicians, nurses, and other clinicians often provide care that is wasteful, even harmful. Patients and families are dissatisfied with and sometimes traumatized by the way they're involved in end-of-life decisionmaking, while health professionals can feel backed into a corner, providing care they perceive as non-beneficial to a dying person, then experience moral distress and burnout as a result. In this Medical Center Hour, palliative care specialist Dr. Leslie Blackhall suggests that these difficulties may not simply signal communication problems, though health professionals and families do have a notoriously hard time having difficult conversations around prognosis and [...]
DVD
2012
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
7.

On Human Participation in Research: Re-Thinking the Common Rule

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The human-subject research landscape in the U.S. has altered dramatically since the early 1980s, when the current research regulations were formulated. The volume of research in both health services and social sciences is up. Many studies involve multiple sites, scores of investigators and reviewers, and thousands of participants. New investigative tools forimaging, informatics, and genomics ave inflected research aims, methods, and conditions.; After two decades, is it time to update the federal rules protecting persons who take part in research? If so, what revisions should be made, and what will their impact be? This Medical Center Hour addresses the possible changes the federal government is presently considering. Dr. Jerry Menikoff, (M.D., J.D., Office for Human Research, Protec [...]
DVD
2012
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
8.

Out of Their Way: Seeking Health in America, Wise County 2009

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In this Medical Center Hour, Mr. Cunningham performs a portion of his full-length play and thus gives voice to some of our unique neighbors in Wise County. Using the forms, tools, and techniques of theater, this production seeks to raise awareness, spark conversation, inspire change that can directly affect those persons who most need medical care.
DVD
2011
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
9.

A Meditation on Still/Here: Learning From Survivors

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As part of his UVA residency, (7-11 Nov. 2011), dancer-choreographer Bill T. Jones comes to the Medical Center Hour to offer reflections on the body, illness, mortality, storytelling, and the spirit of survival. These themes play out prominently in his work, especially in his 1997 piece, Still/here, which he created in workshops with persons who were living with terminal illness.
DVD
2011
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
10.

Listening, Looking as Collaboration: A Poet and a Painter Create Together

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Both award-winning and nationally recognized in their own fields, poet Gregory Orr and painter Trisha Orr have been married for almost 40 years. On four occasions they have experimented with collaborative projects. In each case, the collaborative process challenged them to grow beyond the narrowing definitions of their previous work. And each collaboration, while not always easy, yielded insights and growth that registered in the artists' subsequent work. This Medical Center Hour provides a richly illustrated narrative of these collaborative projects, and also considers the challenges implicit in stepping outside the boundaries of one's own expertise and field in order to engage creatively with another person's perspective. What's required for authentic and successful collaboration [...]
DVD
2012
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
11.

Health Care 2020 Your Practice: A Disruptive Prognosis

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The Affordable Care Act will do little to relieve the increasing tensions between the needs of the people and those of the health professionals who care for them. The earthquake of 2011 can be interpreted as an introduction to the jolt that will rock health care around 2020. There will be profound, fast-paced changes in the ways that doctors and nurses work and in the places where they work. There is no place to hide. In this lecture, two thought leaders in health care describe the fast-approaching new environment of practice and question clinicians' preparation for it.
DVD
2012
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
12.

Echoes of the Heart: A Cardiologist Discovers His Patients Through Poetry and Photography

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Patients sometimes complain that they are neither heard by nor really known to their doctors especially, perhaps, subspecialists to whom they've been referred for particular procedures and fear that, as a result, they may receive substandard care. Similarly, in fast paced practice, some physicians, including said subspecialists, may find it difficult to know their patients as persons. Cardiologist Joseph Gascho M.D. met these challenges for himself and his patients by devising ways he could hear and know the persons in his care through the media of photography and poetry. This Medical Center Hour examines doctors' use of the arts to improve the care that patients receive. Dr. Gascho describes three projects that have helped him to bridge the patienthood personhood gulf, enabling him [...]
DVD
2012
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
14.

Creating Healthy Communities

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Summary from flyer
DVD
2013
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
15.

In the Name of Pain: Pain and the Stigma of Disability

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Summary from flyer
DVD
2013
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
16.
DVD
2013
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
18.

Five Easy Steps to Metaphysical Fitness

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Summary from flyer
DVD
2013
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
19.

Improving Patient-Physician Communication About End-of-Life Care: Is Virginia Ready for POST?

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Physician Orders for Scope of Treatment (POST) is an initiative gaining acceptance across the country as a way for patients and families to ensure that care at the end of life is not only consistent with a patient's preferences, as expressed in a treating physician's orders, but also is consistent throughout the health care system, including across institutional boundaries. A completed POST form is an instrument that travels with the patient from one health care setting to another, as, for instance, from a nursing home to a hospital, and should be honored in all venues. Unlike traditional advance directives, POST is a physician's order, and is to be followed as such. Implementing POST is a process being handled state by state, with Oregon in the lead. In Virginia, pilot studies are u [...]
DVD
2012
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
20.

Medical Storytelling at Its Best

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As a UVA undergraduate (Class of 2010), Pennsylvania native Matthew Miller had a catastrophic, near fatal cycling accident on the Blue Ridge Parkway while training for an Ironman triathlon. He lost control of his bike as a caravan of classic cars passed by in the opposite lane; Miller plowed into an oncoming Porsche, breaking every bone in his face. Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Michael Vitez's articles about Miller for The Philadephia Inquirer (reprinted in the Charlottesville Daily Progress) led to his book, The road back: a story of grit and grace (2012). This compelling narrative of Miller's remarkable survival and recovery. He is now a third year medical student at the University of Pennsylvania not only celebrates the strength and resiliency of the human spirit but also viv [...]
DVD
2012
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)