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History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series
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1.

Identifying Disease in the Past: Chroniclers and the Black Death

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Dr. Osheim discussed how various writers and historians in the 13th and 20th centuries described the Black Death.
VHS
2003
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
2.

Identifying Disease in the Past: Chroniclers and the Black Death

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Dr. Osheim discussed how various writers and historians in the 13th and 20th centuries described the Black Death.
VHS
2003
Ivy (By Request)
3.

Prepared Pregnancy Loss: A Call for a New Standard of Care

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Layne, who has recently written a book, Motherhood lost, describes her own experiences with miscarriages as examples in discussing the current medical situation concerning the care of women who experience such losses.
VHS
2004
Ivy (By Request)
4.

Thinking About Healing: One Scholar's Journey

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Brian Stock, Ph.D. (Distinguished Professor of History and Literature, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada) was interviewed by Marcia Day Childress, Ph.D. Topcis ranged from why Dr. Stock left medical school, how Dr. Stock chose to study the intellectual history of science and how Dr. Stock analysed the acts and habits of "reading" across the ages and cultures in relation to meditation, spiritual/monastic disciplines (e.g. Benedictine) and self-knowledge.
DVDOnline
2008
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
5.

Beyond Safety and Efficacy: Should the FDA Consider Ethics in Drug Approvals?

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Fran Hawthorne (Senior Contributing Editor, "Institutional Investor," independent writer on business and social policy, author of "Inside the FDA: The Business and Politics Behind the Drugs We Take and the Food We Eat") asked the question, "Is the FDA the right place for ethical and social deabates and lobbying?" Telling the stories of drugs used for lethal injections, saline versus silicone breast implants, RU486, Plan B, Geron, and Guardisil, Hawthorne showed how there has been a radical change in the way that the FDA operates and approves drugs. Richard A. Merrill, LL.B. (Daniel Caplin Professor of Law Emeritus, University of Virginia) traced more FDA history with the stories of saccharine and layatril and suggested that the enlarged role of the FDA be made legitimate.
DVDOnline
2008
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
6.

What Is "Dead" Anyway?: Determining Death for Organ Transplantation

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Susan E. Lederer, Ph.D. (Associate Professor, History of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, and Associate Professor of History and African American Studies, Yale University, New Haven Connecticut) read a quote from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein to launch into a history of organ transplantation and the real fears that existed of inaccurately determing death and some legal cases that ensued. She highlighted the stories of the Herrick twins, Louis Washkansky, Christian Barnard, Norman Shumway, and Richard Lower to name a few. Timothy L. Pruett, M.D. (Strickler Family Professor of Transplantation, University of Virginia, and President, United Network for Organ Sharing (OPTN/UNOS) talked about the controversies surrounding organ donor death, the need for organs (especially kidneys)and the [...]
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
7.

A Doctor's Reflections on Illness in a High-Tech Era

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Robert L. Martensen, M.D., Ph.D. (Director, Office of History, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland; Lecturer, Department of Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; and Adviser, American College of Surgeons and Cunniff-Dixon Foundation on Palliative Care Education for Physicians) addressed the reasons for writing his book entitled, "A Life Worth Living: A Doctor's Reflections on Illness in a High-Tech Era." Dr. Martenson covered aspects of change and continuity in the practice and delivery of medical care in the United States. Specifically he discussed the elements of specialization, affluence, commercial values in medicine, the effects of medicare, the need for effectiveness research," the prevalence of "corrupted speech," and changes in the "s [...]
DVDOnline
2009
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
8.

Displaying Dead and Different Bodies: Spectacle/Sideshow/Education?

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Paul Root Wolpe, Ph.D. (Senior Fellow, Center for Bioethics and Associate Professor, Departments of Psychiatry, Medical Ethics, and Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) discussed the ways in which humans think of and view "bodies." Dr. Wolpe illustrated with what he termed the "misshapen body" (such as the specimens on display at the Mütter Museum), the "reconstructed body" (such as cloned animals and the Body Worlds exhibitions of plastinated human bodies) and the "deconstructed body" (such as gender changing surgeries). Melanie A. McCollum, Ph.D. (Associate Professor of Medical Education, Department of Cell Biology, and Course Director, Gross and Developmental Anatomy, University of Virginia) talked about the importance of bodies for learning and the [...]
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
9.

Root Shock: The Impact of Urban Renewal on Health

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Mindy Thompson Fullilove, M.D. (Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York) described the impact that the destruction of neighborhoods has on individuals and communities. Fullilove illustrated this disruption of a "known ecosystem" via the Hill district demolition in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the 1950's and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and the "Find the Rivers" project in Pittsburgh as she emphasized this phenomenon as a fracture that needs repair and reconnection not a cancer that needs to be excised. "Find the Rivers" project was one example of repair illustrated by Fullilove. Maurice D. Cox, B. Arch. (Associate Professor of Architecture, University of Virginia, and former Councilor, Charlottesville City Council) told the s [...]
DVDOnline
2007
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
10.

Jefferson: A Man of Medicine

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M.C. Wilhelm, M.D. (Joseph Helms Farrow Professor in Surgical Oncology, Assistant Director of Education for the Cancer Center, University of Virginia Health System) presented a lecture on his synthesis of a collection of Thomas Jefferson letters that were collected by Oscar Thorup Jr. (M.D. and former faculty of the University of Virginia, School of Medicine). Oscar Thorup was researching the work and life of Thomas Jefferson prior to his passing on October 21, 2002. Some of the topics discussed by Dr. Wilhelm were education, Jefferson's library, the creation of the University of Virginia and the School of Medicine and Jefferson's views on medical morals, public health, ideas about health in general, and suicide.
DVD
2010
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
11.

Normal at Any Cost: Tall Girls, Short Boys, and the Medical Manipulation of Height

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Susan Cohen and Christine Cosgrove (Medical Science Journalists, Berkeley, California and co-authors of "Normal at Any Cost: Tall Girls, Short Boys, and the Medical Industry's Quest to Manipulate Height") presented the history, socio-cultural implications, and ethical controversies surrounding the use of human growth hormones. Synthetic estrogen or DES (Diethylstilbestrol) was highlighted in its use for limiting or promoting height growth in young girls and boys.
DVDOnline
2010
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
12.

Suffering in Silence: 100 Years of Sickle Cell Disease in the United States

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Carlton Haywood, Jr. PhD., MA (Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, School of Medicine, and Berman Institute of Bioethics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland) presented a complete background on the one hundred year history of sickle cell disease in the United States, including its discovery, experiences of persons with this disease, racial implications, treatment, research challenges and associated inequities. Pamela A. Ross, M.D. (Associate Professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland) described her experiences with working with patients with Sickle Cell Disease and common physician perceptions and attitudes towards persons with this disease. Dr. Ross would like to see improved standardization of care and more effective pain protocols.
DVDOnline
2010
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
13.

CSI Edinburgh: Forensic Science in the Era of Burke and Hare's Anatomy Murders

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Lisa Rosner, Ph.D. (Professor of History, Richard Stockton College, Pomona, New Jersey and author of "The Anatomy Murders: Being the True and Spectacular History of Edinburgh's Notorious Burke and Hare and the Man of Science Who Abetted Them in the Commission of Their Most Heinous Crimes") resurrected the story of the Burke and Hare anatomy murders that took place in the 1820's in Edinburgh, Scotland. In her narrative she described how homicide investigations and typical forensic procedures were conducted in the 1800's. She set the scene by illustrting the West Port district of the Old Town and the following key characters: William Burke, William Hare, Helen M'Dougal, Margaret Hare, Madgy Docherty, and Dr. Robert Knox. Some nuances of British and Scottish law were also addressed.
DVDOnline
2010
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
14.

Our Bodies, Ourselves: Reading the Written Female Body

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Susan Wells, Ph. D. (Professor of English, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) traced from 1970 to the present (2009), the transformation of the popular women's health publication entitled, "Our Bodies, Ourselves," which now also has a website. The editions of this book illustrate movements from ignorance to knowledge; objective to subjective; and the autonomous to communal. Dr. Wells pointed out that women became more active in wanting to understand, accept, and champion their personal health and wellness. "Our Bodies, Ourselves" began with an emphasis on female genitalia/sexual behavior and the reproductive cycle and then encompassed other areas such as menopause and aging in later editions. JoAnn V. Pinkerton, M.D. (Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Directo [...]
DVDOnline
2009
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
15.

Antiqua Medicina: Aspects in Ancient Medicine

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This colloquium represents a congress of scholars from such diverse fields as philology, archaeology and medicine and covers a wide range of topics, including ancient gynecology, contraception, surgery in the Homeric epics, ancient medical inconography, and Hippocratic physiology. The speakers are: (1) John Riddle, North Carolina State University ("Eve's apple and Inanna's Huluppu Tree: as early as early can get for birth control"), (2) Lesley Ann Dean-Jones, University of Texas at Austin ("Why is this woman smiling? A Representation of a uterine fumigation on an Attic Skyphos"), (3) Ranes Chakravorty, University of Virginia School of Medicine ("War wounds in Homer's Iliad"), (4) Amanda S. McDaniel, University of Virginia ("Creation and the potter's wheel"), and (5) Ann Ellis Han [...]
VHS
1997
Health Sciences (Rare Shelves)
16.

Dying in the City of the Blues: Sickle Cell Disease and the Politics of Health Care in the South

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Dr. Wailoo gives a history of sickle cell anemia in the 20th century, paying particular attention to Memphis, Tennessee.
VHS
2000
Ivy (By Request)
17.

The Politics of Vaccination in American History

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James Colgrove, Ph.D., M.P.H. (Assistant Professor of Sociomedical Sciences, Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY) traced the history of vaccination in the United States, from Smallpox to Invasive pneumococcal disease, with an emphasis on the political and social challenges surrounding the administration of vaccines to hard to reach children, infants, and preschoolers. Dr. Colgrove addressed the role of government as provider/funder and its limitations as well as the perceptions of risk by the society at large.
DVDOnline
2008
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
18.

Dissection, Deception, and Resurrection: Anatomical Instruction in Virginia in the 19th Century

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Jodi L. Koste, M.A. (Associate Professor, VCU Libraries; Archivist and Head, Resources and Operations, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia) described the history of anatomy instruction in schools of medicine in general and most specifically in the Commonwealth of Virginia during the nineteenth century. Highlighted were the Schools of Medicine at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville and the Medical Department of Hampden Sydney College (later established as the Medical College of Virginia) in Richmond, Virginia. Koste unearthed the use of unclaimed bodies as well as practices using illegal and unethical means for obtaining and transporting bodies for instruction. Persons such as Robley Dunglison, Augustus L. War [...]
DVDOnline
2008
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
19.

An Iconography of Contagion: 20th Century Health Posters

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Michael Sappol, Ph.D. (Curator-Historian, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland) introduced the traveling exhibit of posters entitled, "An Iconography of Contagion" which was created for the National Academy of Sciences using posters from the National Library of Medicine's collection. Dr. Sappol gave a brief introduction of iconography and followed with an historical timeline of predominantly United States public health posters from the early 20th century with some from Europe, Asia, and Africa. Commentary covering public health education campaigns, strategies, and goals was addressed. Public health infecious diseases displayed and discussed were pneumonia, malaria, gonorrhea, syphilis, and AIDS.
DVDOnline
2010
Health Sciences (Service Desk)
20.

Healing Art: Music as Medicine

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Anna Kate Oppenheimer, M.A. (Premedical student at Goucher College, Baltimore) shared her personal stories of and passion with music and service. Anna described the difference between a program entitled "Musicians on Call" and the formal "Music therapy." Both of these programs foster healing by offering avenues for relaxation, enjoyment, and connections of mind, body, and spirit. Baroque and Impressionist genres were described as good choices for "Musicians on Call" when the audience is unknown, tactfulness is desired, and performance space is limited. This presentation incorporated several performances: Anna performed the 4th section (Sarabande) of J.S. Bach's "Cello Suite No. 1 in G Major" (BWV 1007); the UVA Chamber Singers, directed by Michael Slon, M.M. (Assistant Professor, M [...]
DVDOnline
2008
Health Sciences (Service Desk)