You searched for:

Series
:
Great Greek Myths
x
20 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Orphee

On certain evenings, the constellation of Lyra is visible in the skies. Following Orpheus' death, Zeus placed the constellation in the sky, as a tribute to the greatest poet and musician in Greek mythology. Watched over by the muses from birth, Orpheus' talent enchanted nature, both trees and animals alike. A brave young man, Orpheus left with Jason's crew on board the Argo, to conquer the Golden Fleece. But what poets and artists remembered most about the myth of Orpheus was his passionate love story with the beautiful Eurydice. Having been bitten by a snake, Eurydice was condemned to join the kingdom of the dead. A distraught Orpheus followed her, and thanks to his lyre, managed to convince the Couple of the Underworld, Hades and Persephone, to give him back his wife. They accepted [...]
Online
2016; 2015
2.

Appollon

Although they were the son and daughter of Zeus, Apollo and his twin sister Artemis were born under threats from the goddess Hera. Zeus' wife Hera never forgave the twins' mother - the nymph Leto - for her union with the King of Mount Olympus, and she forced Leto into exile. As a result, Apollo was a wandering god, who did not grow up on Olympus. He was a musician and an excellent archer, and was both gentle and cruel. He was also very handsome, but this did not spare him from being disappointed in love. At the service of his father, he created the first sacred site in Delphi, where mortals from all over the world came to question Pythia. But Apollo also incurred Zeus' wrath several times, even endangering himself in the process, and almost found himself in the depths of Tartarus.
Online
2016; 2015
3.

Theseus

Theseus was the fruit of dual paternity: Aegeus King of Athens slept with Aethra when she had just been raped by Poseidon, God of the Sea. Theseus, who grew into a strong, brave young man, therefore had a double lineage - both divine and royal. Unsurprisingly, once he was old enough to fight, he decided to leave for Crete to take on the terrible Minotaur, which devoured 14 young Athenians a year, delivered to Minos, King of Crete. The Minotaur, one of the best known figures in Greek mythology, was a veritable Monster, born from the forbidden union of Minos' wife Pasiphaë and a white bull. He was enclosed in a labyrinth built by the inventor Daedalus. Theseus killed the Minotaur thanks to his courage - but also thanks to Ariadne, King Minos' daughter, who gave him the means to leave t [...]
Online
2016; 2015
4.

Antigone: The Woman Who Said "No"

Antigone was one of Oedipus' four children. She had two brothers, Eteocles and Polynices, as well as a sister, Ismene. One day, her sister informed her that her two brothers, who were heirs to the throne of Thebes, were fighting each other for power. They had agreed to take power alternately, but when the time came for Eteocles to hand his crown over to Polynices, he refused. An inevitable war ensued. Antigone rushed to try to reason with them, but to no avail, and the combat ended with the death of both men. But Creon, Oedipus' brother, and regent of power, decided to impose the law. He refused Polynices a ritual burial, ordering his body to be abandoned on the battlefield. Antigone, who found Creon's decision unbearable, defied the ban: she said "No".
Online
2016; 2015
5.

Aphrodite: Dictated by Desire

Kronos revolted against his father Uranus. He severed his father's genitals, and threw them into the sea, where they mingled with the foam and gave birth to Aphrodite. Aphrodite was born from this highly unusual union. She inspired romantic love and physical attraction in equal measure. Aphrodite was a magnificent goddess. Zeus married her to Hephaestus, the lame god. But Aphrodite soon chose a lover - the god of war, Ares. Nobody could resist the goddess Aphrodite, who was the object of much jealousy on Olympus. One day, Eris, the goddess of discord, threw an apple between Athena, Aphrodite and Hera. On it was written "To the most beautiful." The task of choosing between the three goddesses was entrusted to a young shepherd, Paris. His decision led to a war that lasted for ten years [...]
Online
2016; 2015
6.

Athena: Armed Wisdom

The Goddess of War Athena was the wisest, most level headed and rational deity. She was born out of Zeus' skull, wearing a helmet and holding a spear. She was the protector of heroes, the State, and mankind, to whom she passed on many inventions. She was also a very beautiful woman, who attracted a great deal of attention, including that of the lame god Hephaestus. She regularly clashed with her arch-rival Poseidon. At Poseidon's expense, she won the vote of the people of Athens. Athena experienced jealousy on just the one occasion: the young woman Arachne, an expert weaver, claimed she could weave better than anybody else - including Athena. For a God, even the highly reasonable Athena, this proved difficult to bear.
Online
2016; 2015
7.

Bellerophon: The Man Who Wanted to Be a God

Bellerophon, the grandson of Sisyphus, one of the Greek world's worst criminals, dreamt of becoming a hero, of being equal to the Gods. But his plans got off to a bad start with the accidental murder of his brother. Forced into exile, he took refuge in Tyrins. But there too, nothing went according to plan: accused of rape by Queen Stheneboea, he left to visit the King of Lycia, who in a bid to get rid of him, imposed fearsome challenges on him. Bellerephon was victorious, thanks to Pegasus the horse, but he subsequently committed the sin of pride, boasting to the priests that he was singlehandedly responsible for his own success. For Zeus, claiming to be equal to the Gods was an unpardonable error, so he caused Bellerophon to fall, which resulted in him going blind.
Online
2016; 2015
8.

Daedalus and Icarus: A Shattered Dream

Daedalus, a prominent Greek inventor, settled in Crete among King Minos' court. Queen Pasiphaë, who had an all-consuming passion for a white bull, called upon his services. The Sea God Poseidon had given the bull to her husband King Minos as a present, and King Minos had refused to sacrifice it for him. To take his revenge, Poseidon cast a spell on the poor Pasiphaë. Following orders, Daedalus found a solution to enable the queen to mate with the animal. Their union produced the Minotaur, a monster that King Minos shut away in a labyrinth built by Daedalus. Unfortunately, when King Minos found out that Daedalus had helped the young Theseus to find a way out of the labyrinth, he shut Daedalus and his son Icarus inside it. The shrewd Daedalus found a way to escape - but his method put [...]
Online
2016; 2015
9.

Dionysus: An Outsider in the City

Zeus had a reputation for being a seducer of women. One day he lay with a mortal - Semele, the daughter of the king of Thebes. Their son Dionysus did not immediately join Olympus on account of his dual identity. Dionysus was brought up by nymphs. One day he discovered the vine, and decided to travel the world teaching mankind the art of making wine out of it. He was an errant, wandering God, and was often considered marginal. He left for Thrace, and then for India, accompanied by a noisy procession of Maenads and Silenus. He often aroused the suspicion of the people he encountered, and they sometimes rejected him. In Thebes, his birth city, he wanted to make his voice heard, that of the "Other," the different one. His message of tolerance and openness, his encouragement of poetry, th [...]
Online
2016; 2015
10.

Hades: A Reluctant King

Having become organizer of the world, Zeus entrusted the world of the sea to his brother Poseidon, and the underworld, or the kingdom of the dead, to Hades. Alone, in a place he had not chosen himself, Hades reigned over the people of the shadows and over the grimacing creatures that surrounded him. One day, having left his kingdom to breathe a little air on the surface, he crossed paths with the beautiful Persephone, with whom he fell in love - and abducted her. Her mother, Demeter, the Goddess of Agriculture and Harvest, was beside herself with grief. When she heard her daughter had been abducted, she threatened to render the earth barren and the fields impossible to cultivate. Caught between Hades' desire and love for the young girl, and Demeter's resolution and sadness, Zeus had [...]
Online
2016; 2015
11.

Heracles: The Man Who Became a God

We all know about Heracles' unequalled strength, and the twelve labors he had to carry out, but we know a great deal less about the way in which his life was turned upside down by a series of terrible curses. Born from the union between Zeus and Alcmene, Heracles was a target for Zeus' wife Hera's jealousy, and she sent snakes to kill him while he was still in his cradle. Hera manipulated Heracles once again when he killed his wife Megara and their children. To redeem himself, he handed himself over to his cousin, the terrible Eurystheus, who imposed twelve tasks on him. These ranged from slaying the Lernaean Hydra, a gigantic seven-headed serpent, to capturing the Cerberus, the fearsome, three-headed dog that guarded the underworld.
Online
2016; 2015
12.

Hermes: The Impenetrable Messenger

Hermes was the youngest of the Gods of Olympus. Right from birth, he was an insolent, thieving, trickster God. While still a baby, he escaped from the cave in which his mother Maia gave birth to him, and stole Apollo's herd. He subsequently invented the first lyre, which he offered him as a sign of reconciliation. Zeus admired the young God Hermes, and entrusted him with several missions: to become a messenger, to become an intercessor between the living and the dead, to promote trade and to encourage the circulation of travellers. But he was also his father's best ally, and helped him carry out numerous attempts at seduction. He was a difficult God to fathom, and one could never be sure he was not trying to trick them. Hermes was well liked on Olympus, but sometimes also aggravated [...]
Online
2016; 2015
13.

Medea: Murderous Love

On his quest to find the Golden Fleece, Jason asked the cruel King of Colchis and his daughter Medea, a powerful sorceress, for help. Medea fell in love with Jason, helped him to find the precious Fleece, and fled with him. Numerous adventures and misfortunes stemmed from this passionate encounter, and poor Medea seemed to be at the origin of them. The two young lovers took refuge in Greece, got married, and Medea gave birth to two children. But one day, Jason succumbed to the call of power. He rejected Medea, and married the daughter of the King of Corinth. Alone and sorrowful, Medea planned a terrible revenge that devastated the man she loved with a destructive passion.
Online
2016; 2015
14.

Oedipus: The Riddle Solver

No mortal endured more terrible a tragedy than Oedipus. He was the son of King Laius, King of Thebes, who, as a young man, having abused King Pelops' son, caused his death. The Gods forbade him to have offspring, and decreed that if Laius gave birth to a son, that son would kill him. However, his wife Jocasta did give birth to a son, Oedipus. Laius removed Oedipus from Thebes, and he grew up far away from the city, without knowing his true identity or the curse that weighed upon on him. Once Oedipus had reached adulthood, he met a man on a chariot, who threatened him. Oedipus killed him. He then went to Thebes, and prepared to tackle the Sphinx, because he had heard that whoever managed to slay the terrible animal threatening the city could marry the recently widowed Queen Jocasta, a [...]
Online
2016; 2015
15.

Perseus: The Look of Death

Perseus was not meant to come into the world. Fearing the fulfilment of the prediction according to which his grandson would kill him, King Acrisius shut his daughter Danaë away in a fortified tower. But Zeus fell in love with Danaë, and in order to conquer her, metamorphosed into a golden shower. Perseus was born from this union. Once he had become a man, Perseus was given the challenge of bringing the head of the Gorgon to the tyrant King Polydectes, who was holding his mother captive. This was the start of Perseus' great adventure, which became a veritable legend for all the Greek heroes that came after him, because taking on Medusa was an act of madness, as whoever set eyes on her would turn to stone. The young Perseus set out in search of the Gorgon - the most terrifying of crea [...]
Online
2016; 2015
16.

Prometheus: The Rebel of Olympus

Taking revenge against Prometheus, Zeus created the first woman - the beautiful Pandora. He gave her a manipulative and deceptive character, and subjected Prometheus to terrible torture. Prometheus and his brother Epimetheus were the sons of a Titan, Japetus. Japetus clashed with Zeus in the Battle of the Titans, whereas Prometheus - which means "forethought" - guessing that Zeus would be the victor, sided with him. But although Zeus and Prometheus both shared a shrewd and cunning nature, they clashed fiercely. Prometheus wanted to be of help to mankind, and managed to convince Zeus to give them fire. But when Zeus decided to relegate humans to their place, and to create a hierarchy between the gods and man, Prometheus opposed him...
Online
2016; 2015
17.

Psyche: Beauty and the Beast

In this myth, many versions of which have been passed down through the ages, Psyche is the Beauty. Concerned that his daughter did not have a suitor, Psyche's father consulted Pythia, who announced grave news: Psyche's father must leave her on a hilltop, from where a monster would come take her away. In fact, Psyche was welcomed into a magnificent castle. Instead of being a monster, her husband was reassuring and tender. His only request was that she should not attempt to look at his face. Of course Psyche tried to find out who this unknown person was, and jeopardized the highly unusual, budding romance in the process. Jealous of Psyche's beauty, the Goddess Aphrodite was at work in the wings. Psyche must carry out many tasks and avoid many traps in order to find the man she loves, w [...]
Online
2016; 2015
18.

Tartarus: The Damned of the Earth

Located in the bowels of the Earth, Tartarus was the prison of the Underworld, the place where fallen Gods and banished heroes ended up. The Gods also sent three men there... The first was Sisyphus. A roguish trader, Sisyphus dared denounce Zeus for taking away a young woman he was intending to seduce. His punishment was to roll a boulder up a mountain for evermore. The second man to be sent to Tartarus was Tantalus. Close to the Gods, King Tantalus committed an unforgiveable act: having no food to eat, he killed his own son to give him to the Gods to eat. As for the dishonest and cruel Ixion, he was reckless enough to try and seduce Zeus' wife Hera. All three men were condemned to eternal suffering for believing they were invincible in the face of the Gods.
Online
2016; 2015
19.

Zeus and the Conquest of Power

To earn the title of Master of Olympus, Zeus took many important steps, and overcame many challenges. His story is one of an incredible conquest of power, dating back to time immemorial, when the world began. Born from Chaos, Gaia - Mother Earth - mated with Uranus, the sky. Many children were born from their union, notably the Titans and the Cyclops. The youngest of the Titans, Kronos, revolted against his father, who had suffocated his mother and their children. Having beaten his father, he decided to swallow all his own children to avoid the risk of one of them stealing power from him. Yet the youngest child survived, and waged a war against Kronos, the Titans, and many other creatures. This God was none other than Zeus.
Online
2016; 2015
20.

Zeus in Love

The Master of Olympus succumbed to the pleasures of seduction, because just like for a simple mortal, it was no easy task for him to overcome his desires. Having become Master of Olympus, the great seducer Zeus embarked upon many a romantic conquest, thereby reinforcing his power, through the many children he engendered. His first wife was Metis. His third, who was known as his wife on Olympus, was the jealous Hera. But there was also Themis, the goddess of Justice, with whom he produced the Hours, the Fates and the Mnemosyne - meaning "memory" - who gave birth to nine Muses. In order to achieve his aims, Zeus metamorphosed. He was an expert at changing shape and form. He turned into a charming prince in order to seduce Semele, the king of Thebes' daughter, who gave birth to the god [...]
Online
2016; 2015