You searched for:

Series
:
Fire and Ink, the Legacy of Latin American Literature
x
26 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Pre-Columbian Literature [electronic resource]

The history and social structures of Latin America's native peoples were neither simple nor peaceful before the arrival of Europeans. Wars were fought, empires were created and destroyed, and-as this program illustrates-narrative tapestries of fact and fiction were woven in the process. Underscoring the linguistic sophistication that flourished for thousands of years in the region, the program addresses the proliferation of Nahuatl and Quechua literature, the codices and quipu of Mayan and Incan societies, and other ancient forms of written and oral communication. Although mythical accounts-including the Popol Vuh, the Chilam Balam, the Apu Ollantay, and the Runa yndio-are analyzed on several levels, they are most notably linked with the agendas of pre-Columbian social hierarchies.
Online
2007; 2008
2.

Conquest and Colony [electronic resource]

To the European imagination, America was a tabula rasa, a virgin territory. As this program describes, narrative art forms were essential to making sense of this exotic Eden and the possibilities it offered. New Spain became a place for re-creating myths and legends of the Western literary canon, for transforming poetry, prose, and epic literature. The diaries of Columbus, Bartolome de las Casas' History of the Indies, Bernal Diaz' True History of the Conquest of New Spain, and Bernardino de Sahagun's Florentine Codex are explored along with works from indigenous authors of the early colonial period-such as Ixtlilxochitl (History of the Chichimec Nation), Munoz Camargo (History of Tlaxcala), and Alvarado Tezozomoc (Mexicayotl Chronicle)
Online
2007; 2008
3.

Politicians and Revolutionaries [electronic resource]

The Era of Revolution severed political ties between Latin America and the Old World-but cultural independence was another matter. This program explains how the region's literature began to come into its own, relying on models and themes imported from Spain while establishing a dialogue with other literary traditions and aesthetic movements. Through the work of Jose Joaquin Fernandez de Lizardi, Esteban Echeverria, Bartolome Hidalgo, Mariano Melga, Jose Marti, Cirilo Villaverde, and other writers, viewers will become familiar with the "literature of independence" particular to Latin America-one that threads together the old and the new, the alien and the indigenous, to form its own unique creations.
Online
2007; 2008
4.

From Romanticism to Realism [electronic resource]

The 19th century brought tumultuous political change to Central and South America. This program shows how the cultural crucible of the region fused and realigned aesthetic movements considered sacrosanct in Europe-specifically, Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism. In an eclectic matching game that became typical of Latin American literature, Realist and historical novels existed cheek-and-jowl with Romantic poetry, Romantic novels competed with the anecdotes of Ricardo Palma, and newspaper serials vied for attention with costumbrismo-a genre that depicted everyday manners and customs. Jicotencal, Jorge Isaacs' Maria, and Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's Guatimozin, Last Emperor of Mexico are among the works discussed.
Online
2007; 2008
5.

Modernismo [electronic resource]

It was an aesthetic movement with an ambitious program: linguistic innovation as a means of liberation from Romanticism and Neoclassicism, and as a way to clarify Latin American identity. As this program explains, Modernismo coincided with a burst of interest in stories and accounts that were tied to the creation of independent nation states. Viewers will discover valuable insights regarding this cultural tidal wave and the ways in which it transformed the novel, lyrical poetry, and nonfiction prose into highly original shapes. The achievements of Ruben Dario, Jose Marti, Manuel Gutierrez Najera, Jose Asuncion Silva, and other seminal writers are examined, along with the external influences of the Symbolists and the Parnassian Poets.
Online
2007; 2008
6.

Regionalism and Indigenism [electronic resource]

The literature of Latin America has always defied homogeneity-and the first decades of the 20th century were no exception. This program studies artistic responses to Modernismo that accompanied a deepening appreciation of local cultural currents forming across the region-currents that, however disparate, were flowing into a shared identity. The forces that paved the way for a new avant-garde, replacing traditional means of discourse with a fractured and anxiety-ridden worldview, are analyzed. The concept of novelas de la tierra or "novels of the land" is addressed, as are the writings of Alcides Arguedas, Horacio Quiroga, Jose Eustasio Rivera, Romulo Gallegos, Martin Luis Guzman, Gregorio Lopez Fuentes, Rafael Munoz, Nelly Campobello, and numerous others.
Online
2008
7.

The Avant-Garde of the 1920s [electronic resource]

After the horrors of World War I, Latin American writing turned away from what many saw as ornamental and frivolous experimentation. This program studies the so-called "criticism of Modernismo within Modernismo" in which language reached back to a simpler, more intimate, less urban-centered framework. Investigating the work of several poets and authors of the period-including Enrique Gonzalez Martinez, Julio Herrera y Reissig, Maria Eugenia Vaz, Leopoldo Lugones, Delmira Agustini, Ramon Lopez Velarde, and Cesar Vallejo-the program reveals complex dynamics of nationalism and cosmopolitanism, Western literature and indigenous voices, and the spirit of breaking with the past and of belonging to an artistic tradition.
Online
2007; 2008
8.

Narrating Modernity [electronic resource]: Writers of the Mid-20th Century

The mid-20th century was an era of large-scale and often tragically violent political shifts which completely changed the face of Latin American life-and art. As this program demonstrates, the rise of military dictatorships and authoritarian regimes forced a reassessment of issues that had been problematic since Latin American countries gained their independence. These dilemmas brought intense pressure on social institutions and energized the works of Jorge Luis Borges, Octavio Paz, Pablo Neruda, Roberto Arlt, Cesar Vallejo, Alejo Carpentier, Silvina Ocampo, and Juan Carlos Onetti. The significance of the Rio de la Plata region and Angel Rama's concept of narrative transculturation also inform the discussion.
Online
2007; 2008
9.

The Latin American Boom [electronic resource]

By the 1960s, Latin America's avant-garde movements had matured into a range of literary styles that were firmly entrenched in the cultural landscape. At the same time, there emerged a new and distinctive accent to Latin American literature that was no less authentic than its forebears. This program surveys the artistic phenomenon, manifested most notably in magical realism, that came to be known as the Latin American Boom. Examining the role of journalism and the ways in which various authors stylized their reporting in the service of artistic goals, the program looks at the work of Alejo Carpentier, Augusto Roa Bastos, Julio Cortazar, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Juan Carlos Onetti, Jose Donoso, Miguel Angel Asturias, and Juan Rulfo.
Online
2007; 2008
10.

After the Boom [electronic resource]

As the 1970s progressed, the political climate in Latin America became increasingly dark, with no end in sight to the proliferation of brutal dictatorships. This program analyzes the cultural impact of those developments and the tensions which gave Latin American literature of the period its energy and resonance. With insight into the challenges of writing in the face of tyranny, the program explores the work of authors from the Southern Cone region and offers perspectives on Carlos Monsivais, Elena Poniatowska, Rodolfo Walsh, Miguel Gutierrez, Oswaldo Reynoso, Julio Cortazar, Hector Tizon, and Diamela Eltit. The emergence of the urban cronica is discussed in depth.
Online
2008
11.

Brazilian Literature [electronic resource]: First 500 Years

Unified by the Portuguese language, the literature of Brazil represents the cultural synthesis of three distinct influences: indigenous peoples, European emigres, and Africans brought to the New World as slaves. This program reflects on those influences as it examines the first five centuries of recorded Brazilian writing. With an overview of ancient folklore and verse, the program highlights connections between Brazilian and Baroque traditions; it also studies the importance of Neoclassicism and Romanticism, Realism and Naturalism, and Parnassianism and Symbolism. Works by Claudio Manuel da Costa, Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, Alberto de Oliveira, Raimundo Correia, Olavo Bilac, Euclides da Cunha, and others are featured.
Online
2008
12.

Brazilian Literature [electronic resource]: 20th Century

In the first decades of the 20th century, Brazilian avant-garde literature came into its own. This program examines the awakening of Modernismo and subsequent movements in Brazilian letters, from Sao Paulo's Week of Modern Art in 1922 to the politically focused milieu of the 1970s. Outlining historical events that helped shape the country's multifaceted culture, the program explores the writings of Graciliano Ramos, Jose Lins do Rego, Augusto Meyer, Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Jorge Amado, Erico Verissimo, Clarice Lispector, and Nelida Pinon, and others. It also looks at the Brazilian literature of today as it struggles to create new styles and forms that can do justice to its turbulent history.
Online
2008
13.

21st Century Trends in Latin American Literature [electronic resource]

Complacency has never been a hallmark of Latin American literature. As the 21st century dawned, many young writers-and even some who had fueled the Latin American Boom-grew disenchanted with the status quo. This program profiles the careers and the potential of literary artists at the forefront of the region's emerging narrative trends. Addressing the influence of the Crack Movement and the McOndo Group-as well as an increasing overlap between cinematic and literary concerns-the program studies the work of Cesar Aira, Ricardo Piglia, Sergio Pitol, Juan Villoro, Fernando Vallejo, Roberto Bolano, Jorge Volpi, Alberto Fuguet, Edmundo Paz Soldan, Marosa di Giorgio, and Pedro Lemebel.
Online
2008
14.

Pre-Columbian Literature [electronic resource]

The history and social structures of Latin America's native peoples were neither simple nor peaceful before the arrival of Europeans. Wars were fought, empires were created and destroyed, and-as this program illustrates-narrative tapestries of fact and fiction were woven in the process. Underscoring the linguistic sophistication that flourished for thousands of years in the region, the program addresses the proliferation of Nahuatl and Quechua literature, the codices and quipu of Mayan and Incan societies, and other ancient forms of written and oral communication. Although mythical accounts-including the Popol Vuh, the Chilam Balam, the Apu Ollantay, and the Runa yndio-are analyzed on several levels, they are most notably linked with the agendas of pre-Columbian social hierarchies.
Online
2007; 2008
15.

Conquest and Colony [electronic resource]

To the European imagination, America was a tabula rasa, a virgin territory. As this program describes, narrative art forms were essential to making sense of this exotic Eden and the possibilities it offered. New Spain became a place for re-creating myths and legends of the Western literary canon, for transforming poetry, prose, and epic literature. The diaries of Columbus, Bartolome de las Casas' History of the Indies, Bernal Diaz' True History of the Conquest of New Spain, and Bernardino de Sahagun's Florentine Codex are explored along with works from indigenous authors of the early colonial period-such as Ixtlilxochitl (History of the Chichimec Nation), Munoz Camargo (History of Tlaxcala), and Alvarado Tezozomoc (Mexicayotl Chronicle)
Online
2007; 2008
16.

Politicians and Revolutionaries [electronic resource]

The Era of Revolution severed political ties between Latin America and the Old World-but cultural independence was another matter. This program explains how the region's literature began to come into its own, relying on models and themes imported from Spain while establishing a dialogue with other literary traditions and aesthetic movements. Through the work of Jose Joaquin Fernandez de Lizardi, Esteban Echeverria, Bartolome Hidalgo, Mariano Melga, Jose Marti, Cirilo Villaverde, and other writers, viewers will become familiar with the "literature of independence" particular to Latin America-one that threads together the old and the new, the alien and the indigenous, to form its own unique creations.
Online
2007; 2008
17.

From Romanticism to Realism [electronic resource]

The 19th century brought tumultuous political change to Central and South America. This program shows how the cultural crucible of the region fused and realigned aesthetic movements considered sacrosanct in Europe-specifically, Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism. In an eclectic matching game that became typical of Latin American literature, Realist and historical novels existed cheek-and-jowl with Romantic poetry, Romantic novels competed with the anecdotes of Ricardo Palma, and newspaper serials vied for attention with costumbrismo-a genre that depicted everyday manners and customs. Jicotencal, Jorge Isaacs' Maria, and Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's Guatimozin, Last Emperor of Mexico are among the works discussed.
Online
2007; 2008
18.

Modernismo [electronic resource]

It was an aesthetic movement with an ambitious program: linguistic innovation as a means of liberation from Romanticism and Neoclassicism, and as a way to clarify Latin American identity. As this program explains, Modernismo coincided with a burst of interest in stories and accounts that were tied to the creation of independent nation states. Viewers will discover valuable insights regarding this cultural tidal wave and the ways in which it transformed the novel, lyrical poetry, and nonfiction prose into highly original shapes. The achievements of Ruben Dario, Jose Marti, Manuel Gutierrez Najera, Jose Asuncion Silva, and other seminal writers are examined, along with the external influences of the Symbolists and the Parnassian Poets.
Online
2007; 2008
19.

Regionalism and Indigenism [electronic resource]

The literature of Latin America has always defied homogeneity-and the first decades of the 20th century were no exception. This program studies artistic responses to Modernismo that accompanied a deepening appreciation of local cultural currents forming across the region-currents that, however disparate, were flowing into a shared identity. The forces that paved the way for a new avant-garde, replacing traditional means of discourse with a fractured and anxiety-ridden worldview, are analyzed. The concept of novelas de la tierra or "novels of the land" is addressed, as are the writings of Alcides Arguedas, Horacio Quiroga, Jose Eustasio Rivera, Romulo Gallegos, Martin Luis Guzman, Gregorio Lopez Fuentes, Rafael Munoz, Nelly Campobello, and numerous others.
Online
2008
20.

The Avant-Garde of the 1920s [electronic resource]

After the horrors of World War I, Latin American writing turned away from what many saw as ornamental and frivolous experimentation. This program studies the so-called "criticism of Modernismo within Modernismo" in which language reached back to a simpler, more intimate, less urban-centered framework. Investigating the work of several poets and authors of the period-including Enrique Gonzalez Martinez, Julio Herrera y Reissig, Maria Eugenia Vaz, Leopoldo Lugones, Delmira Agustini, Ramon Lopez Velarde, and Cesar Vallejo-the program reveals complex dynamics of nationalism and cosmopolitanism, Western literature and indigenous voices, and the spirit of breaking with the past and of belonging to an artistic tradition.
Online
2007; 2008