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1.

Place Without People

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A Place Without People: Tanzania tells the story of the eviction of the indigenous people from their lands in Tanzania, to make way for the creation of the world's most famous nature reserves. In Tanzania, one of the poorest nations in the world, the government, the tourist industry and conservation organizations have advanced the idea that Africans are intruders into what was once a pristine Garden of Eden. The film describes how before World War II the land of the Maasai was seized by British colonialists to set aside for their own sport -- hunting. But as game grew scarce, the British realized they should preserve it and the Serengeti was turned into a vast national park in the 1950's and '60's. This land, possibly the longest-inhabited place on earth, was labelled a 'primordial w [...]
Online
2009
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2.

Frontline [electronic resource]: An Eyewitness Account of the Vietnam War

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This Academy Award nominee is a must for all courses dealing with the Vietnam War and its divisive effect on the American people. Its focus is Neil Davis, a news cameraman whose famous combat footage was shown all over the world. As an Australian, he perceived the war from a different perspective than any American journalist. Davis formed a deep attachment to the Vietnamese troops and was even allowed to cross enemy lines. He was the only Western journalist to film the fall of Saigon. His insights into the many ironies of this war will allow younger audiences to understand its complexities and its horrors.
Online
1980
3.

Harry Hopkins [electronic resource]: At FDR's Side

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During the turbulent times of the Great Depression and World War II, Franklin D. Roosevelt presided over great changes in America and the world - changes that would have been impossible without the efforts of one extraordinary man - FDR s friend and advisor, Harry Hopkins. The son of a harness maker from Iowa, and, for 20 years, a social worker in New York, Hopkins was invited by Roosevelt to head the Works Progress Administration (WPA) during the Great Depression. Within four weeks, he had put four million people to work. He went on to help Roosevelt establish numerous federal programs that live on today. Despite failing health, he made his greatest impact during World War II. He was Roosevelt s personal envoy to Winston Churchill, executing the Lend-Lease program and helping the co [...]
Online
1992
4.

Chile [electronic resource]: A History in Exile

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Cecilia Aranada returned to Chile years after her family had escaped the bloody Pinochet regime. Her own mother had been held and tortured in the Estadio Nacional, the infamous stadium from which many never emerged. She was shocked that in Chile today, many did not know of the horrors of the Pinochet regime. Instead, they attribute today's prosperity to progress under the dictator. Interviewing Chileans who escaped at that time, including one of Allende's guards, she records the powerful memories of those who were torn from their families, beaten, raped, and subjected to electric shock. With deep emotion, they speak of the friends and relatives they lost. They recall the promise of the Allende regime, the first Marxist democracy in Latin America, where there seemed to be new opportun [...]
Online
2000
5.

Rosa Parks [electronic resource]: The Path to Freedom

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It has been only forty years since the fateful day that Mrs. Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the bus, yet the chain of events that she set in motion has changed the world forever. In honor of this anniversary, Kingberry Productions (which produced The Freedom Train) has compiled a biography of this dynamic but quiet woman, whose demand for her civil rights led to the social changes of the sixties. This documentary contains an overview of the events that took place in Montgomery, Alabama: Mrs. Parks arrest, the bus boycott, and the segregation laws that were finally overturned. It also tells the story of the Rosa Parks that few people know -- the former seamstress whose life continues to be committed to social justice for all people.
Online
1996
6.

Shackles of Memory [electronic resource]: The Atlantic Slave Trade

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From the port of Nantes, located on the French Atlantic coast, more than 1800 slave ships plied their human cargo during the 18th and 19th centuries. These French ships circled the coast of Africa, exchanging trade merchandise for black captives whom they later sold to the colonies being established in the New World. Africans were deported by the millions, not only by the French, but by the Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, and English, starting as early as the 15th century. In this important historical film, the grim details of the slave trade are made real for a modern audience. Paintings, documents, and artifacts recount the immensely profitable trade that enriched the great port cities of Europe as it decimated the African people. None of the tropical colonies would have prospered had [...]
Online
1996
7.

Greensboro [electronic resource]: Closer to the Truth

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This documentary explores the Greensboro Massacre of 1979 and its aftermath. Members of the Communist Workers Party massed for a "Death to the Klan" rally in Greensboro, North Carolina when a caravan of Ku Klux Klan and American Nazis arrived. As the police assigned to protect the rally inexplicably disappeared, the Klansmen opened fire, killing five demonstrators and injuring eleven others. Now, a quarter of a century later, the survivors have finally come upon a way to get to the heart of what really happened by mounting a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (2004-2006). The film focuses on five of the survivors of the attack, examining the paths they have taken since 1979. These activists have each struggled to stay true to their ideals. Two of the Klan figures -- one a former Gra [...]
Online
2009
8.

Honor Bound [electronic resource]

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During the Second World War, while America was fighting the Japanese, a unit of second-generation Japanese-Americans was fighting bravely on the European front. These sons of Japanese immigrants proved their courage and loyalty on the fiercest battlefields, as they fought to overcome the stigma of Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor. The 100/442nd Regiment suffered the highest rates of casualties and became the most decorated unit in American history. Meanwhile back at home, their families were in desolate internment camps, forced to leave their homes, farms, and businesses. This film, made by the daughter of one of the soldiers, tells their story through remembrances and archival footage. With pride the veterans recall how they rescued the "Lost Battalion" of 211 Texans about to be annih [...]
Online
1996
9.

Nova Scotia [electronic resource]

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The population of Nova Scotia ebbed and flowed from the major wars that shaped Canada and the United States. The Jones family experienced slavery and segregation since southerners from the United States had settled in Nova Scotia. Part of a series: Hymn to Freedom: The History of Blacks in Canada.
Online
1998
10.

Ontario [electronic resource]

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The Duvall family are descendents of fugitive slaves who fled New Orleans by way of the Underground Railway in the 1860s. There were, at that time, already 25,000 free black people in Canada. Part of a series, Hymn to Freedom: The History of Blacks in Canada.
Online
1998
11.

The Rouge [electronic resource]: The Factory and the Workers

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When it was built in 1918, the Ford motor plant in Detroit was the largest industrial complex in the world. The plant was the embodiment of Henry Ford's vision to build cars that every American working man could afford to buy. Using old footage, The Rouge captures the flavor of the early part of the century when thousands of workers flocked to Detroit in search of a better life. They came from Europe, from Mexico, and the southern United States to work on the assembly line. The Rouge became an important part of labor history from the time it was built until the time it was organized by the United Auto Workers in 1941. When the Depression hit the country, the Rouge workers were laid off and suffered in great numbers. At the height of the depression, five workers were killed outside of [...]
Online
1998
12.

Two Dollars and a Dream [electronic resource]

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This is a biography of Madame C.J. Walker, the child of slaves freed by the Civil War, who became America s first self-made millionairess. By interweaving social, economic and political history, it also offers a view of black America from 1867 to the 1930 s. Mrs. Walker' fortune was built on skin and hair care products. She parlayed a homemade beauty formula into a prosperous business, marketing her products from coast to coast. Her daughter, A Leilia Walker, was an important patron of the Harlem Renaissance. The two women lived in royal style, complete with a mansion and chauffeured limousines. This little known story is both entertaining and informative. It combines interviews, historical stills and unique film footage including scenes from Harlem s famous Cotton Club. The film is [...]
Online
1989
13.

Chinatown Files [electronic resource]

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Amy Chen's acclaimed new documentary The Chinatown Files reveals the hidden story of Chinese-American men and women who were hunted down, jailed, and targeted for deportation during the Cold War hysteria of the 1950s and l960s. Their interviews are interwoven with rare home movies, photographs and archival films exploring the prejudice and xenophobia surrounding U.S.-China relations. During the McCarthy era witchhunts, the loyalties of over ten thousand American citizens of Chinese descent were questioned based on their ethnicity and alleged risk to national security. Henry Chin, a laundry worker and president of the Chinese Hand Laundry Alliance and the China Daily News, describes how "Chinese immigrants came to America for a better life for themselves and the loved ones they left b [...]
Online
2001
14.

Willa Beatrice Brown [electronic resource]: An American Aviator

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Willa Beatrice Brown, the first African-American woman in the U.S. to be a licensed pilot, earned her license in 1937. She and her husband, Cornelius Coffey, founded a fully accredited flying school at Harlem Airfield, near Chicago. The school provided basic through advanced mechanic training and flight instruction for thousands of men and women, both black and white. Willa became a founding member of the National Airmen's Association of America, whose purpose was to lobby Congress for the racial integration of the US Army Air Corps. Her efforts were responsible for Congress creation of the renowned Tuskegee Airmen, leading to the integration of the U.S. military service in 1948. Despite her many accomplishments, few people have heard of Willa Brown. This documentary tells her story [...]
Online
2009
15.

Agent Yellow [electronic resource]

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Agent Yellow is a powerful indictment of the U.S. government's systematic prejudice against Chinese-American scientists. The film focuses on the mistreatment of Chinese scientists who contributed significantly to American military research, specifically describing the tragic cases of Dr. Wen Ho Lee and Dr. Tsien Hsue-Sher. On June 2, 2006, Dr. Wen Ho Lee, an atomic scientist once suspected of espionage, settled an invasion of privacy lawsuit against the U.S. government for $1,645,000. Dr. Lee, who worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, brought his case against the government in 1999, the year federal investigators accused him of giving nuclear secrets to China. He spent nine months in solitary confinement awaiting trial. Ultimately, he pleaded guilty to one felony co [...]
Online
2006
16.

Inside Castro's Cuba [electronic resource]

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The eyes of the world have been on Cuba as thousands of Cubans have risked their lives trying to reach the U.S. Inside Castro's Cuba looks at what drove many to leave and what the reality is for the vast majority of Cubans who stayed behind. With the collapse of the Soviet bloc, Cuba has been presented with its toughest test of strength since the revolution thirty-five years ago. Filming in Cuba for an entire year, the filmmaker gained rare access to Castro himself and to his personal archives. The result is an insightful view of the man and his people. People wonder how long Castro will maintain his leadership. The film discovers huge support for him because he brought Cubans a higher standard of living than that of any other country in the third world. Still vigorous and tenacious [...]
Online
1996
17.

Spirit Doctors

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Folk healing has been part of the Mexican culture since pre-Columbian days. This tradition still flourishes in the Mexican American communities of the lower Rio Grande Valley. This film follows three healers in their daily work. Josefa, a traditional curandera, uses a variety of herbal and spiritual techniques. She is shown giving blessings, performing ritual cleansings and communicating the wandering soul of the dead man. Maria heals her patients by channeling the spirit of Mexico's most famous healer who died sixty years ago. Trini is a traditional partera, or midwife. She plays an important role in the community where one third of all births take place outside of the hospital. Filmmaker Monica Delgado is herself a descendant of a curandera and partera. These cameo portraits show h [...]
Online
1997
18.

Spirits for Sale

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When Annika is given an eagle feather by a Native American visiting Sweden, she realizes it is a sacred object which should probably not be in her hands. These days Native American ceremonies are being commercialized for "outsiders," arousing resentment in the Native community. Annika sets out to find the feather s rightful owner, a quest which takes her to American Indian communities in Albuquerque, San Antonio and to Bear Butte in South Dakota. She meets many Native Americans who are bitter, believing they are "the forgotten people." But others are fighting to preserve their culture and their faith as well as to protect their land. Navajo Andrew Thomas, who manages the Albuquerque Pueblo Center, explains that certain tribes use feathers in special ways to communicate with "the Uppe [...]
Online
2008
19.

Straight Up Rappin

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Anybody who believes that crime, poverty, and drugs have killed political thought among the young people of America's most disadvantaged neighborhoods, has only to see Straight Up Rappin to be set straight. This compelling documentary is about rap as it is declaimed in the streets of New York, straight up - without music. These rappers, amateurs all, feel a compelling need to express their feelings about the world they live in. There are ten-year olds who rap about the Bill of Rights, young men who rap about homelessness and child abuse, a young woman who raps about revolution. The powerful and often bitter words of their street poetry, expresses the political consciousness of their generation.
Online
1993
20.

Struggle for Identity: Issues in Transracial Adoption

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Because of all the upheavals worldwide and the social problems in our own country, many idealistic people are tempted to rescue children through foster care and adoption. But they may not be prepared for the kinds of problems that can arise. This powerful new video brings into focus the issue of race, culture and identity in adoptive or foster families It is refreshing to hear teenagers speak so candidly about their conflicts and confusions. One African American girl says "My parents are Swedish American and I love my parents, but at the same time ... we need to look to black parents to give us the answers." Another girl remembers that as a child she desperately wanted to return to her country. Another young man questions how parents will react when their adopted kids goes through th [...]
Online
2000