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European Inventor Award 2016
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1.

Electronic Stability Control for Cars

Anton van Zanten has dedicated a lifetime of invention to the improvement of automotive safety technology, most notably in the field of vehicle collision prevention. His milestone contributions include the widely marketed Electronic Stability Control system (ESC) - also known as ESP (Electronic Stability Program) - an electronic guidance technology that helps to avoid skidding under loss of surface traction, including aquaplaning or braking on snow or ice.
Online
2016
2.

Ultrasound to Safely Measure Brain Pressure

The two inventions by Arminas Ragauskas and his colleagues at the Health Telematics Science Center at Kaunas University of Technology offer a safe and accurate method to non-invasively measure intra-cranial pressure and brain blood flow autoregulation, respectively, employing ultrasound waves instead of costly and potentially dangerous invasive surgery and implantation of invasive sensors into the brain. If left unchecked, the pressure can increase to dangerously high levels due to complications such as traumatic brain injury, stroke or brain tumors.
Online
2016
3.

Biomechatronic Leg Joints

The invention pioneered by U.S. biophysicist and rock climber Hugh Herr is an intelligent knee prosthesis system marketed as the Rheo Knee. A ground-breaking invention in the field of prosthetics, the Rheo Knee allows wearers to walk with a natural gait by using a microprocessor that automatically adapts the prosthesis to the stance and walking speed. The Rheo Knee takes prosthetic design into the realm of bionics - the intersection of medicine and information technology.
Online
2016
4.

Helping Newborn Babies Breathe

Curosurf is a clinical treatment for pre-term infants - born before 37 weeks of gestational age - suffering from infant respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), a life-threatening condition of the lungs. Curosurf was developed by Tore Curstedt and Bengt Robertson. Curstedt's solution relies on a phospholipid extract of natural porcine lungs with the chemical name poractant alfa. Administered through a breathing tube and inserted into the trachea, Curosurf coats infants' lung alveoli and reduces surface tension, thereby preventing RDS.
Online
2016
5.

Treatment for Parkinson's Disease

The invention by French neurosurgeon and physicist Benabid is a novel treatment approach to neurological conditions, known as high-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS). DBS relies on a surgical procedure during which doctors insert a high-frequency electrical probe into the patient's brain - worn permanently like a pace maker - which can then be used to administer electrical charges at controlled intensities of 130 HZ to targeted regions of the thalamus and surrounding areas.
Online
2016
6.

Secure Smartcard Encryption

Joan Daemen (Belgium) and Pierre-Yvan Liardet (France) are cryptographers who developed a method to bolster the security of smartcards with embedded microprocessors that can store a customer's phone data (SIM cards), a depositor's bank account information (debit cards) or personal information (government ID), to name a few. There are security measures in place to prevent a card from ever being used to break into recipient cards after the initial recording or to clone recipient cards.
Online
2016
7.

Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI)

As a new generation of medical imaging technologies, MPI delivers images at up to 0.5 mm spatial resolution, practically in real-time. MPI's high resolution and real-time imaging could allow investigation of an extensive range of dynamic medical phenomena, including cardiovascular research, which cannot be studied using other techniques.The technology offers significant improvements over the prior state of the art: MPI does not expose patients to ionising radiation, like X-rays and CT scans.
Online
2016
8.

Diagnostic Kits for Developing Countries

Helen Lee and her team at the Diagnostics Development Unit at University of Cambridge created the fundamental principle behind simple, rapid, point-of-care diagnostic tests for a range of different infectious diseases such as HIV, Hepatitis B, chlamydia, gonorrhoea or influenza. The rapid results of the test also solve the problem of patients being "lost to follow-up" - by showing up for tests, leaving, and not returning for diagnosis - which can amount to 30-70% of patients in some areas.
Online
2016
9.

Gluten Substitutes From Corn

Cerne and Polenghi have made it possible for people suffering from coeliac disease to enjoy fulfilling, flavorsome - and most importantly, gluten-free - diets without having to avoid foods such as pastas, breads or other baked goods. Gluten can be found in all sorts of food and beauty products, even some that may not be so obvious, such as soaps. For those with coeliac disease, consumption of even a tiny amount of gluten can trigger an immune reaction that damages the fine, bristly inner surface of the small intestine.
Online
2016
10.

Targeted Anti-Cancer Drugs

The invention by American chemical engineer Robert Langer and team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge relies on delivering anti-cancer drugs in synthetic polymers to ensure their targeted delivery to target sites, such as tumor sites. Covering the highly potent pharmaceuticals in biodegradable plastics helps focus the drug's effect where it is needed: directly at the tumour site. The drugs used in the invention include those that are designed to "starve" tumors by inhibiting the process of angiogenesis - the formation of blood vessels feeding them.
Online
2016
11.

Faster Wireless Connectivity

Paulraj is the principal inventor behind MIMO (multiple input multiple output), a wireless networking technology that is fundamental to the increases in connectivity speed to which many people around the world have grown accustomed to. Current 4G LTE networks and latest WiFi for instance, wouldn't be possible without this breakthrough invention. He improved the spectral efficiency of wireless networks, meaning he found a way to transmit higher data rate within the same channel bandwidth (frequency spectrum).
Online
2016
12.

Ammonia Storage to Reduce NOx

The team developed a way to safely store ammonia in solid form, thereby making it possible for drivers to use the volatile chemical in diesel vehicles to reduce NOx pollution or as an environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels. Integrated in a complete system, the cartridges of AdAmmine release ammonia to be mixed with diesel exhaust gases such that the NOx is reduced to harmless water vapor and nitrogen (which already make up ca 78% of the atmosphere). It can also be used as an indirect source of hydrogen for use in modified diesel engines or in electric fuel cells.
Online
2016
13.

Paper Transistors

The invention pioneered by Elvira Fortunato, Rodrigo Martins and their team at New University of Lisbon, consists of transistors crafted from cellulose fiber - in other words paper exploited for electronics purposes. The paper-based transistors open new applications for low cost and disposable electronics, require much less energy to manufacture, are made from readily available materials, and can be recycled safely as opposed to the standard silicon components that require high process temperatures creating, for low cost commodities the so-called high-tech trash that paper could replace part of it.
Online
2016
14.

Implantable Artificial Heart

The CARMAT heart is the world's first fully implantable, self-regulating artificial heart. It was created by renowned French cardiologist Alain Carpentier who spent nearly two-and-a-half decades developing a mechanical pump that accurately replicates the contractions of a human heart. Unlike similar devices that simply maintain an unchanging rhythmic pulse, Carpentier's device adjusts the volume of blood it pumps according to the needs of the human body, thereby improving a patient's quality of life.
Online
2016
15.

Rolling Fluid Turbine

The SETUR Turbine, a novel hydropower turbine pioneered by engineer Miroslav Sedlácek and team at the Czech Technical University in Prague, exploits a novel hydrodynamic principle - a rolling fluid principle (vortex dynamic) - making it possible to generate electricity in small, previously untapped water reservoirs such as tidal streams, small rivers and brooks. This rolling fluid principle was discovered by Miroslav Sedlácek in 1993. He used this as basis for construction of bladeless turbine (SETUR).
Online
2016