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Ethical Markets International Finance Reform
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1.

Why Reform Global Finance? [electronic resource]: Stresses and Imbalances

During the late '90s and onward many countries fell victim to the repercussions of "hot money"-funds that were shrewdly managed for short-term profit in spite of their tendency to increase market instability. Economic meltdowns in Africa and elsewhere were so severe they eventually sparked humanitarian groups to call for cancellation of the poorest countries' debt. In this program Hazel Henderson examines the need for global finance reform with a panel of three renowned economists. Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, director of the UN's Human Development Report, believes globalization has harmed impoverished nations, and former IMF chief economist Kenneth Rogoff proposes the use of grants instead of loans. Controversial author John Perkins (Confessions of an Economic Hit Man), also an independent e [...]
Online
2005
2.

Getting From Here to There [electronic resource]: What the World's People Want

A paradigm shift has occurred since the founding of the World Bank over half a century ago, representing a new awareness of how reduction-of-poverty programs impact the daily lives of the people they aim to help. The people themselves are making their voices heard. Global public opinion in the form of online activists, the findings of research groups such as Columbia University's Earth Institute, and the UN's 1998 Declaration of Human Duties and Responsibilities all indicate a wish for less spending on military budgets and more on basic human rights. In this program a panel of economists respond to Hazel Henderson's assertion that world opinion is slowly reshaping economic models, and that ethical investing plays a key role in this change. Do the poor really have a voice when global [...]
Online
2005
3.

Reforming the World Bank [electronic resource]

The World Bank was founded in 1944 mainly as a way to help Europe rebuild after the Second World War, and it has since become the premiere agency for aiding developing countries. But critics began to say that the World Bank's rigid economic formulas failed to take into account the societal differences of those it served, that its projects were ecologically harmful, and that despite aid, billions of people were still lacking access to food, clean water, and education-but were now in debt to more powerful nations. The World Bank expanded its mandate to address these concerns, but has there been measurable change? In this program Hazel Henderson discusses the World Bank's focus on the noneconomic aspects of development with former IMF chief economist Kenneth Rogoff; Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, [...]
Online
2005
4.

Reforming the International Monetary Fund [electronic resource]

Like its sister organization the World Bank, the IMF was created after World War II with the goal of stabilizing the economy of nations in need, and like the World Bank, faced an onslaught of criticism by the dawn of the 21st century. Developing countries were going deeper into debt by following the prescriptions of the IMF, at the expense of their citizens' day-to-day quality of life. In this program Hazel Henderson discusses the ethics of debt restructuring, and whether the only entities who benefit from IMF loans are rich nations and the despotic leaders of the countries who receive aid. Henderson is joined by Kenneth Rogoff, former IMF chief economist, who supports the use of austerity measures and explains what bankruptcy would mean to emerging economies; UN Human Development Re [...]
Online
2005
5.

Visions of a Brighter Future [electronic resource]

Hazel Henderson believes the old models for development are changing, going beyond GDP and GNP to broader indicators of wealth based on peace and human rights. According to Henderson, the rise of nonprofits, NGOs, and volunteer workers has challenged old-fashioned corporate mentalities, and the concept of socially responsible investing is gaining momentum. Is an era of environmental sustainability, respect for social concerns, and global cooperation now possible? In this program Henderson and a panel of economists share their views on what lies ahead for the human family, touching on the UN's Millennium Development Goals and the vision of the Darwin Group-who submit that Charles Darwin spent more time addressing "the human genius for altruism and cooperation" than he did on survival [...]
Online
2005
6.

Robots Taking Over [electronic resource]: What Will Humans Do?

NASA Chief Scientist Dennis Bushnell and futurist Hazel Henderson explore the advance of automation as more and more sectors of industrial societies are digitized: from manufacturing to retailing, accounting, healthcare, education, legal services, and even finance. They discuss emerging alternatives such as worker-owned companies; cooperative enterprises; and guaranteed basic incomes now enacted in Brazil, Mexico, and proposed in Switzerland, Europe, and the USA.
Online
2015
7.

Privacy in the New Media Age Versus the First Amendment: Part II [electronic resource]

Futurist Hazel Henderson continues discussing with Professor Jon L. Mills his current book, Privacy in the New Media Age. The conversation focuses on the USA and how the Constitution favors free speech and press in the First Amendment over individual rights to privacy. Mills cites many examples of how individuals are harmed in today's social media, by false statements by bloggers, ubiquitous cameras in public places, tracking individuals' movements via their cellphones and GPS, data-collecting by government and by corporations selling users' personal data to advertisers, as well as snooping by drones. Again, these new technologies and media have outrun the law and public awareness and in some cases even dubious rulings by the Supreme Court.
Online
2015
8.

Investing in Desert Greening

Hazel Henderson, Dennis Bushnell, and Carl Hodges look at opportunities to shift agriculture to desert regions and grow salt-loving plants with seawater and free daily photons from the sun. This halophyte agriculture could provide most of the food, fiber and biofuels for the growing human population on earth.
Online
2015; 2014
9.

Making Ethical Investing the New Normal

Ethical Markets Media president Hazel Henderson hosts AQAL Capital GmbH founder and general manager Mariana Bozesan of Munich, Germany as well as Green Alpha ® Advisors co-founder and chief investment officer Garvin Jabusch. Until recently "ethical", "responsible", "green" investing has been a niche asset class in most progressive portfolios. Henderson explores the potential for this to become 100% of portfolios with two successful, ethical, "green" asset managers. They discuss supporting young entrepreneurs, challenge "backwards" looking investment risk models, and identify new green energy financing and managerial models. As environmental consciousness spreads, sustainable investments are becoming economically viable-even Warren Buffett is investing in renewable energy utility plants.
Online
2015; 2014
10.

Rating the Ratings Agencies

Hazel Henderson interviews Claudine Schneider and Lawrence Bloom. They discuss conflicts of interest of ratings agencies like Standards & Poors and Moody's. Bloom describes his optimism for the future, in regards to halophytes for China, and Paraguay's efforts to become the first energy self-sufficient country in the world. Schneider, despite her Republican association, describes her frustration with her party and the need to make change.
Online
2015; 2014
11.

Reforming Capital Markets and Corporate Governance

In this film, Ethical Markets Media president Hazel Henderson and pioneering Canadian bank president and mutual fund innovator Linda Crompton, MA, MBA, review the challenges and progress over the past decades as ethical, green investing began to go mainstream. In the U.S. alone, it now comprises 6.57 trillion dollars or 18% of total investments. Future expansion is expected as real risks are included in traditional financial models. They also discuss barriers to Wall Street and financial system regulation, the student fossil fuel divestment movement, promoting corporate social responsibility, discouraging greenwashing ad campaigns, and how scientific evidence of climate change is helping to convince asset managers to actively invest in renewable energy solutions.
Online
2015
12.

How Adam Smith and Charles Darwin Got Hijacked

Hazel Henderson interviews Kim Ann Curtin, author of "Transforming Wall Street." They discuss the two greatest icons of Western thought, Adam Smith and Charles Darwin, and how their ideas were distorted and misused by elites in 18th century Britain, and now in global economics and finance. Learn about Smith's "Theory of Moral Sentiments" (1759) which explores human behavior in families and communities as empathetic, caring, and cooperative, as well as Darwin's view that humanity's success is based on cooperation.
Online
2015
13.

Transforming Wall Street

In this film, Ethical Markets Media President Hazel Henderson interviews Wall Street Coach CEO and "Transforming Wall Street" author Kim Ann Curtin. In her new book, Curtin interviews 50 well-known Wall Street players on their moral challenges in business and finance and what values guide their behavior, asking if they read Adam Smith's "Theory of Moral Sentiments" (1759). Most had not, and these revealing interviews raise key issues of how further reforms can bring more ethical practices to business and finance. Curtin also discusses her self-empowerment approach to coaching and hopes that her book will encourage people to build integrity in their lives through positive examples.
Online
2015
14.

The Future of Business Education

Chair of the Business Administration Department at Flagler College Dr. Allison Roberts and Hazel Henderson explore the values underlying much traditional business education. Most business schools still teach with obsolete textbooks and assumptions that self-interest competition is "human nature" and that the impacts of business activities harming others and their environmental costs can be "externalized" from company balance sheets.
Online
2015
15.

Reforming Business Education for Sustainable Economies

Linda Crompton and Hazel Henderson review the urgent need to reform curricula at business schools in North America and Europe. Many are still teaching from obsolete textbooks with faulty assumptions that still permit companies, financiers, and governments to "externalize" social and environmental impacts from their balance sheets and pass on the costs to taxpayers, citizens, and the environment.
Online
2015
16.

Asia's Challenges to Western Economies: Ethical Markets 6

In this video, futurist Hazel Henderson and Asian Markets Sustainability Analyst Matthew McGarvey review the new challenges that China and other emerging Asian economies pose to Western economies. Western analysts misunderstand the restructuring in China from exports toward domestic goals and shifting from polluting coal to wind, solar and the "circular economy." The new Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIG) led by China has attracted members like Britain and the IMF. Yet, the US Congress refused to join and is now out in the cold. McGarvey discusses China's social and political accomplishments as it adopts a modern economic model and reflects on efforts to address negative environmental feedback loops. The China experts also explore the rush to new mega-trade deals in Asia and [...]
Online
2015
17.

Transitioning Economies Towards New Values

Futurist Hazel Henderson and Asian Markets Sustainability Analyst Matthew McGarvey, discuss trends toward new values beyond Western GDP-measured economic growth. McGarvey recounts his personal journey from growing up in America's heartland to learning Chinese and working in Beijing, and his experiences in Vietnam and other Asian countries.
Online
2015
18.

Artificial Intelligence: What Happens as Machines Take Over?

NASA Chief Scientist Dennis Bushnell discusses with futurist Hazel Henderson the new alarms raised by Bill Gates, Google's Eric Schmidt, Space-Ex and Tesla's founder Elon Musk and physicist Stephen Hawking that intelligent machines like IBM's Watson may soon outsmart humans. While futurists envisioned "leisure societies," shorter work weeks, guaranteed basic incomes and flowering of culture, art and human potentials - what we got was unemployment, stagnant wages and longer work hours.
Online
2015
19.

Privacy in the New Media Age: Part 1

In this film Ethical Markets president and Futurist Hazel Henderson interviews University of Florida law professor and former speaker in Florida's House of Representatives Jon L. Mills about his current book, "Privacy in the New Media Age." The Internet, social media, blogs, "citizen-journalists" and global news distribution pose thorny issues in many countries. While the U.S. favors free speech over individual rights to privacy, European countries are protecting people's "right to be left alone" and right to delete old records of individual behavior from internet search engines. While Facebook and Twitter facilitated the grassroots Arab Spring protests, these social media sites also helped police to track down and prosecute the dissidents. Mills says technological innovation always [...]
Online
2015
20.

The Future of Education

In this film, Ethical Markets Media President Hazel Henderson and Flagler College President Dr. William Abare discuss growing challenges to education: costs rising faster than inflation, students bearing 1.2 trillion dollars in loans while facing disruptive technological changes, and job markets shifting globally. How are traditional colleges challenged by massive open online courses (MOOCs) such as Khan Academy and millions of students learning free online? How can the benefits of campus-based education be extended to include more students and help counter growing inequality?
Online
2015