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1.

Charlotte Perkins Gilman [electronic resource]: Yellow Wallpaper

Touted as one of the first major feminist writers, Charlotte Perkins Gilman spent her life fighting to liberate women from the yoke of domesticity. This is a stunning BBC dramatization of Gilman's autobiographical account of a woman driven to madness by the repressive mores of Victorian culture. Stephen Dillon as the husband, John, and Julia Watson as the despondent heroine give stellar performances in this production directed by the BBC's John Clive.
Online
2005; 1989
2.

Animated Neuroscience and the Action of Nicotine, Cocaine, and Marijuana in the Brain [electronic resource]

Using sophisticated 3-D animation, this program, divided into two parts, takes viewers on a journey deep into the brain to study the effects of the three substances. The first part illustrates the major functions of the brain and shows how its principal cells, the neurons, communicate with each other through electrical and chemical signals. In the second part, animated molecules of nicotine, cocaine, and marijuana travel a route from the external environment through the body to the brain, where viewers learn about the cellular targets of these drugs, and how each drug interacts with them and subsequently affects the body. Images of actual neurons used in the animations create a realistic effect that helps viewers understand the concepts presented.
Online
2005; 1997
3.

Joseph Conrad [electronic resource]: Heart of Darkness

Joseph Conrad's compelling novella, marked by an ominous tone and a sense of unspeakable menace, is a literary introduction to the savage 20th century. In this program, noted Conrad scholars Bruce Harkness, Frederick Karl, Jerome Meckier, and Dwight Purdy examine the author's life within the context of his times: the pervasive influence of his Polish background, the impact of the sense of isolation he experienced as a merchant marine, and the nightmarish conditions in King Leopold's Belgian Congo. Historic photos and maps help set the tale in the context of time and place. In addition, experts analyze Marlow, Kurtz, the Accountant, the Manager, and Kurtz's fiancé; discuss the importance of literary techniques such as juxtapositioning; interpret the meaning of Kurtz's last words and M [...]
Online
2005; 1998
4.

Geoffrey Chaucer [electronic resource]: Canterbury Tales

Written in the 14th century, The Canterbury Tales has stood the test of time as a landmark in the development of English literature. This innovative "frame story" owes its classic standing and impact to the diversity both of the narrators and of the styles of tales they tell. In this program, expert commentators Dr. Christiania Whitehead and Dr. Peter Mack, both of the University of Warwick, discuss the tradition of 14th-century poetry, the General Prologue, Chaucer's social grouping of the pilgrims and the themes they explore, and the poem as a reflection of Medieval English society. Dramatic reenactments of the pilgrims on horseback and numerous period images help bring the tales to life.
Online
2005; 1998
5.

Ancient Rome [electronic resource]

At its zenith, the Roman Empire included North Africa, Spain, France, and Britain. The wealth that these conquests generated allowed Roman citizens to live in a sumptuous world of beautifully decorated homes and opulent cities. In this program, scholars discuss Roman unification of Europe, Roman culture and institutions, and the family structure. The role of the army as a major force in Roman society and politics, along with its military structure and tactics, are discussed. The Christianization of Rome and the enduring legacy of Roman Law and institutions in Western government today are also analyzed. 3-D re-creations of the Coliseum and Pompeii allow students to see Rome as it was before the empire collapsed.
Online
2005; 1996
6.

Greek Drama [electronic resource]: From Ritual to Theater

Why do plays well over two millennia old still speak to audiences today? This program traces Greek theater from ancient harvest rites to the golden age of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes. Key scenes from Antigone, Oedipus Tyrannus, Medea, and Lysistrata show how these works remain relevant by exploring the timeless themes of honor, class, gender, sexuality, and politics. Essential concepts such as catharsis, hamartia, and the use of masks and a chorus are discussed. Scholarly commentary by Helene Foley of Barnard College, Jeffrey Henderson of Boston University, Princeton University's Robert Fagles, and Peter Meineck of NYU's Aquila Theatre Company emphasizes the vitality of classical drama and the essential role it played in the everyday lives of the ancient Greeks.
Online
2005; 2001
7.

Ancient Greece [electronic resource]

Whether looking at Western language, history, or institutions, no other civilization has so greatly influenced our contemporary world. This program re-creates the Greek world, from the morning market to the evening symposiums, from burial rituals to the Olympics. Beginning with Homer's account of the Trojan War, this program explores Greek civilization using 3-D re-creations of the Parthenon and Agora, maps, and commentary by scholars to provide insight into the daily lives of Greek citizens.
Online
2005; 1996
8.

Ancient India [electronic resource]

The antecedents of modern Indian culture can be traced back to the Harappan civilization, which flourished between 2300 and 1500 BC in what are now Pakistan and Afghanistan. The Aryan tribes from the Russian steppes invaded the subcontinent in 1000 BC, bringing their language and culture. The resulting synthesis between the Aryan and Indian civilizations brought forth a unique society that included a caste system, which soon became entrenched. This program examines the religious tension between Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam, and the historical events that shaped the great Indian civilizations, from the Mauryan Empire through the Mogul Empire. Maps and scholars provide insight into a culture that remains vibrant and diverse today.
Online
2005; 1996
9.

Ancient China [electronic resource]

From the creation legend of Panku to the demise of the Han Dynasty, this program traces Chinese history and explores the roots of Chinese culture today. Visit the Great Wall of China as scholars discuss why it remains even today a symbol of oppression, exemplified in the legend of the weeping woman; the Imperial Palace and how it exemplifies Chinese beliefs in harmony; and the Beijing Opera, whose works are an elaborate retelling of traditional folktales. The influences of Buddhism, ancestor worship, and Taoism in China are also discussed, along with stunning footage of the Buddhist caves and the terra-cotta army.
Online
2005; 1996
10.

Graphs [electronic resource]

This video describes how to read, interpret, and evaluate data displayed in bar graphs, line graphs, and pie charts. Dramatized segments and computer animations illustrate ways to determine the financial advantages of a staggered breeding schedule at a dairy farm; allocate rack space in a CD store, based on regional and local sales figures; and decide whether an athlete's physical characteristics indicate competition as a sprinter or as a distance runner.
Online
2005; 1995
11.

Decimals and Exponents [electronic resource]

This video describes how whole numbers and decimals are used in the monetary system, how to calculate costs in foreign currencies, and how to use exponents. Dramatized segments and computer animations focus on ways to determine the international value of U.S. dollars at a currency exchange; select chairs for an interior decorating job while staying within a budget; and calculate interstellar distances using scientific notation-and imagination.
Online
2005; 1995
12.

Logical Reasoning [electronic resource]

This video describes how to recognize and apply inductive and deductive reasoning. Dramatized segments and computer animations involve determining a crime suspect's guilt or innocence based on clues from a series of convenience store robberies; finding a strategy for winning a game played with coins; and matching students to the sports or musical instruments they play as a part of a puzzle.
Online
2005; 1995
13.

Measurement [electronic resource]

This video describes how to estimate costs of products and services, determine the circumference of an object and its effect on motion, and calculate area and volume. Dramatized segments and computer animations illustrate ways to use measurements taken from blueprints to estimate construction costs; determine tire sizes, which affect vehicle speed; and calculate a running track's circumference to fairly stagger the start lines.
Online
2005; 1995
14.

Fractions [electronic resource]

This video describes the meaning of fractions and how to solve problems involving sums and products. Dramatized segments and computer animations focus on adjusting ingredient amounts to vary the yield of recipes at a bakery; deciding whether to hire an untrained worker at a bike shop by projecting overtime wages and short-term productivity loss; and learning to read musical notation including fractional measures.
Online
2005; 1995
15.

Area and Volume [electronic resource]

This video describes how to calculate the area of rectangles and other shapes-both geometrical and irregular-and how to determine the volume of a rectangular solid. Dramatized segments and computer animations focus on calculating lawn dimensions at a sod farm; creatively redesigning a cereal box while retaining the original volume; and using the Pythagorean Theorem to work out the coverage area for a kitchen floor being tiled diagonally.
Online
2005; 1995
16.

It's the Law [electronic resource]

The laws of the criminal justice system are primarily framed by the Constitution, which sets the standards of due process. In this program, lawyers, prosecutors, and judges explain the differences between misdemeanors and felonies, the various degrees of crimes, and the elements of a crime. Investigation procedures in the gathering of evidence and statements are discussed. Legal experts and police officers clearly illustrate such concepts as 5th Amendment rights, Miranda warnings, the "stop and frisk" rule, search warrants, and the "knock and announce" rule. Probable cause and arrest procedures are also demonstrated.
Online
2005; 2001
17.

Order in the Court [electronic resource]

In this program, various legal experts explain pretrial and trial procedures, pointing out along the way differences in juvenile proceedings. Judges and lawyers navigate the pretrial process, beginning with the establishment of probable cause and formal charging by grand jury. Indictment, pretrial release, bail, and arraignment are also discussed. Such concepts as an alibi, burden of proof, and reasonable doubt are clearly explained. Finally, a panel of experts comments on a sentencing hearing and punishment, along with the defendant's constitutional right to appeal.
Online
2005; 2001
18.

Drugs [electronic resource]

I guess the lowest I ever felt was when I got out of jail and none of my friends were there for me. That's when I opened my eyes, says Logan. In this program, she and her peers Howard and Zeb openly talk about what it was like to become addicted to drugs..and what it took to get straight and stay clean. In addition, Ben Jones, of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, and experienced addiction counselors provide insights into why kids turn to drugs in the first place, how drugs take control of their lives, and the short- and long-term health risks associated with drugs. Onscreen lists that give the lowdown on more than a dozen popular substances are also included, explaining what kids call them, ways that they are taken, how they affect the body, and how they alter b [...]
Online
2005; 2001
19.

Eudora Welty [electronic resource]: Worn Path

On a "bright, frozen day" in Mississippi, 95-year-old Phoenix Jackson makes her mythic journey into town for the medicine her grandson needs. Touching upon themes of family, love, aging, and poverty, this dramatization of Eudora Welty's classic story "A Worn Path" provides both a heroic image of the human spirit enduring against tremendous odds and a poignant commentary on the African-American experience. An interview with Welty herself by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Beth Henley concludes the program.
Online
2005; 1999
20.

John Steinbeck and the American Experience [electronic resource]

This program is a comprehensive portrait of John Steinbeck and the America he depicted, providing students with an appreciation of one of the 20th century's definitive literary voices. Incorporating historic events ranging in magnitude from the devastating Dust Bowl to poignant local histories, Steinbeck portrayed a nation ravaged by poverty and injustice, in which his characters, often drawn from real life, grapple with conditions and events beyond their control.
Online
2005; 1990