You searched for:

Series
:
Complete New Releases Curriculum Library 2006
x
31 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Work It Out! [electronic resource]: Strategies for Resolving Conflict

Last year's Spring Fling at Jefferson High School was a total disaster-and this year's student committee doesn't want it to happen again! But can the group put aside the past and work together constructively to create a successful dance? This video uses scenario analysis to model four key conflict resolution strategies: taking the person out of the problem; focusing on issues, not egos; being objective; and creating win-win solutions. Show your students that differences are a part of who we are-and that while we may not get along with each other all the time, we do have to find positive ways to work out our disagreements.
Online
2005
2.

Introduction to Life Science [electronic resource]

Launch a unit on life science with this video! It addresses central topics in biology-evolution, cellular structure, and hierarchical organization, to name only three; explains the process of scientific inquiry; and spotlights the contributions of key researchers in the life sciences, from Aristotle to Watson and Crick. The video also provides students with a bird's-eye view of many exciting biological fields, including biochemistry, ecology, genetics, marine biology, molecular biology, neuroscience, paleontology, and more. Correlates to National Academy of Sciences National Science Education Standards and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Benchmarks for Science Literacy.
Online
2005
3.

Cells [electronic resource]: Building Blocks of Life

This video takes a close-up look at the lowest common denominator of all life: the cell. It illustrates essential cellular processes-transportation of materials, communication, energy transfer, protein-building, waste disposal, movement, and the all-important mitosis and meiosis-as well as key cellular landmarks like the nucleus, ribosomes, mitochondria, the Golgi complex, the endoplasmic reticulum, and lysosomes. Special attention is given to recent advances in biotechnology. Correlates to National Academy of Sciences National Science Education Standards and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Benchmarks for Science Literacy.
Online
2005
4.

Genetics and Evolution [electronic resource]

What does genetic diversity mean, and what is its relationship to evolution? This video answers that intriguing question as it summarizes the theory of natural selection and describes the process of trait inheritance. Advances stemming from the Human Genome Project-an ever-deepening understanding of life on Earth, improvements in disease detection and treatment, and applications of genomics to agriculture, the environment, and forensic science-are also discussed. Correlates to National Academy of Sciences National Science Education Standards and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Benchmarks for Science Literacy.
Online
2005
5.

Organization and Diversity [electronic resource]

Planet Earth is teeming with life. Help your students make sense of it all by starting them at the bottom of the biosphere-home to bacteria, microbes, fungi, and insects. Organization and Diversity defines key terms, classifies the kingdoms and domains of life, outlines the Linnean hierarchical system, contrasts evolutionary taxonomy with cladistic analysis, and provides powerful DNA evidence supporting the unity of life. Also, the fascinating contributions of molecular taxonomy are showcased. Correlates to National Academy of Sciences National Science Education Standards and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Benchmarks for Science Literacy.
Online
2005
6.

Life Processes of Animals [electronic resource]

Welcome to Kingdom Animalia! Clue your students in on the characteristics of multicellular animals with this video. It illustrates the specialized structure and function of the four basic animal tissue types, describes 12 major bodily systems, and analyzes the process of homeostasis for both endotherms (regulators) and ectotherms (conformers) A concise history of zoology and species classification is also included, and the distinction between vertebrates and invertebrates is explained. Correlates to National Academy of Sciences National Science Education Standards and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Benchmarks for Science Literacy.
Online
2005
7.

Life Processes of Plants [electronic resource]

What are these alien life forms living among us? They're.plants! This video investigates the major differences-and some striking similarities-between plants and animals in the areas of what they consume, how they breathe, and how they reproduce. Plant evolution, cell structure, the photosynthesis/respiration cycle, flowering and non-flowering plants, and sexual and asexual reproduction are covered. Correlates to National Academy of Sciences National Science Education Standards and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Benchmarks for Science Literacy.
Online
2005
8.

Microorganisms [electronic resource]

Open your students' eyes to the hidden worlds of monerans, protists, and fungi with Microorganisms. After watching this video, they'll be able to explain exactly what a microbe is, identify each general type of microorganism by its characteristics and functions, and describe the hazards and benefits of microbes. Microorganisms may live at the root of the evolutionary tree, but they've been around for billions of years, are found everywhere in nature (including the human body!), and are crucial in helping maintain the atmosphere, assisting in digestion and decomposition, and more. Correlates to National Academy of Sciences National Science Education Standards and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Benchmarks for Science Literacy.
Online
2005
9.

Interdependence of Life [electronic resource]

On planet Earth, no living thing is an island. This video identifies the world's ecosystems as it explains the flow of energy and the cycling of matter within them. Terms such as biosphere and biome, biotic and abiotic, autotrophs (producers) and heterotrophs (consumers), and the food web are defined, and ecology and conservation as fields of study are explored. Rainforests serve as a timely and powerful example of the interdependence of life at the global level-and the devastating worldwide effects of deforestation. Correlates to National Academy of Sciences National Science Education Standards and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Benchmarks for Science Literacy.
Online
2005
10.

Junk Food Wars [electronic resource]

Healthy eating is a challenge-sometimes, it's even a battle. With vending machines, convenience stores, and fast food restaurants almost everywhere, nutritional value can go down in defeat. This high-energy video shows how to defend against the dangers of junk food. Straightforward discussions and dramatizations arm students with a wealth of information on the updated 2005 food pyramid, the different kinds of fats and sugars, how to read ingredients labels, and how to control what foods are available. Commentary from nutrition and food policy experts provides backup, with insights into junk food packaging and advertising tactics. Stop losing battles! Join the Junk Food Wars.
Online
2005
11.

From Depression to Discovery [electronic resource]: Teenager's Guidebook

Clinical depression and ignorance are a dangerous combination. Myths surrounding the disease-for example, the notion that it affects only adults-often prevent depressed young people from seeking help. This video shatters common misconceptions about depression, helping young viewers recognize its outward and internal symptoms. The latest forms of treatment are also explored. Interviews with teens who are living successfully with the disease, and commentary by renowned adolescent psychologist Dr. Harold S. Koplewicz, are interwoven with eye-catching and informative graphics that reinforce essential points.
Online
2005
12.

Our Planet Earth [electronic resource]

If Earth's entire history could be compressed into a single year, modern humans would've appeared just 23 minutes ago! Use this video to introduce your students to the concept of geological time (also called deep time); relative age dating of rock via the principles of stratigraphic superposition, original horizontality, and cross-cutting; absolute age dating by radioactive decay; the chemical elements, heavy and light, that make up the planet; and Earth's three main layers: crust, mantle, and core.
Online
2006
13.

Plate Tectonics [electronic resource]

Studies of our planet's crust, or lithosphere, suggest that it's not a single solid layer at all. This video illustrates the process of scientific inquiry by studying the evolution of our understanding of plate tectonics, the dynamics of those ever-shifting slabs of earth we call solid ground. Beginning with Alfred Wegener's hypothesis of continental drift, the program discusses major and minor plates, types of plate boundaries, and the concepts of spreading and subduction. Earthquakes and volcanoes are also addressed.
Online
2006
14.

Rocks and Minerals [electronic resource]

Knowledge of the physics and chemistry of the planet's "bones" is essential to a complete understanding of Earth science. Ranging from the Mohs scale and specific gravity to silicates, carbonates, and halides, this video delves deeply into the composition, properties, and classification of rocks and minerals. An element of forensic-type analysis is also brought into play, since any stony formation represents a portion of the planet's history and local conditions.
Online
2006
15.

Oceans and Seas [electronic resource]

More than 70 percent of the Earth's surface is covered by water. Use this video to impress upon your students the importance of the seven seas to people, the marine food chain, and the planet as a whole. Topics include the various kinds of currents and the forces that influence them, tides and waves (what they are, what causes them, and how they're classified), features of the seabed, and the formation and shaping of coastlines. A basic explanation of how oceans have been affected by human activity is also provided.
Online
2007; 2006
16.

Geocycles [electronic resource]

Planet Earth is an amazing machine, and we-and our future-are riding on it. This video introduces students to the Earth system's primary interacting subsystems (the biosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere); the nitrogen, carbon, and water cycles; and three surface processes: weathering, mass-wasting, and erosion. The greenhouse effect, the impact of acid rain on the environment, and diminishing freshwater resources around the world are considered as well.
Online
2006
17.

Atmosphere, Climate, and Weather [electronic resource]

People everywhere are interested in the weather, but how does it all work? Beginning with Earth's atmosphere-its evolution, its gaseous composition, and its four regions-this video takes a close look at how conditions combine to create climate and weather. Topics include the Koppen Climate Classification System; weather prediction; types of clouds and precipitation; thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes; and weather patterns such as El Nino and La Nina.
Online
2006
18.

Energy and Resources [electronic resource]

As the Earth's fossil fuel reserves decline, what forms of energy will come next? After discussing the formation, uses, and consequences of burning coal, oil, and natural gas, this video explores the development of alternative resources that may someday completely replace them: nuclear power, solar energy, biomass, geothermal energy, hydroelectric power, and wind power. Benefits, costs, and environmental impacts are considered.
Online
2006
19.

Environmental Issues and Human Impact [electronic resource]

This video looks at urgent environmental concerns facing planet Earth and what people can do to repair the degradation humans have caused. Air and water pollution, the effects of pollution on health and the environment, deforestation and loss of wetlands, ozone depletion and global warming, and the negative impact of agriculture, construction, and recreation/tourism are discussed. The program ends with anti-pollution initiatives like recycling and greater energy efficiency. The key message? Individuals can make a difference!
Online
2007; 2006
20.

Smoking Out the Truth [electronic resource]: Teens and Tobacco

You can lecture until you're blue in the face about the horrible effects of cigarettes, but with tobacco companies spending tens of millions of dollars every day on marketing, even the most forceful teachers and counselors need all the help they can get. This video focuses on the illusions and misconceptions surrounding teen smoking, exposing the faulty reasoning that leads kids to start or continue the habit. It also offers several rock-solid motives to quit or abstain - and strategies for doing so. Taking a proactive, student-driven approach, the program features myth-busting classroom presentations delivered by smoking and nonsmoking students alike. Topics covered include the methods and mind-set behind teen-targeted cigarette advertising, the ways that nicotine and tobacco damage [...]
Online
2006