You searched for:

Series
:
Cheese Slices (Series 4)
x
Subject
:
Economic Geography
x
10 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Wisconsin, USA [electronic resource]

Wisconsin has long been known as the cheese capital of America, it's residents refer to themselves as 'cheese heads' and the region is known as Dairyland. This area produces more cheese that any other part of the country, but until recently the traditional cheese types were replaced by bland, mass-produced Swiss and Cheddar. Host Will Studd visits several new and exciting farmstead cheese producers, including Upland's Cheese Company, and Willi Leher, from Bleu Mont Dairy explains how he ripens cheese in an underground cave. Finally, Will heads for the hills for a look at Hidden Springs Creamery where a new organic sheep's milk cheese is being made with the help of the local Amish farmers.
Online
2009
2.

Brie From Brie and the French Affineur [electronic resource]

Brie is more than the mild, creamy, flat cheese, covered in pure white mold that you find in your grocery store these days. Authentic brie is produced in the Ile de France region and comes in different styles. Host Will Studd travels to the region to get a first hand look at the benchmark cheeses Brie de Meaux and Brie de Melun, before visiting Brie's close cousin, Chaource, in the Champagne region. Then it's on to the underground caves of Hervé Mons to find out how this respected affineur selects and matures cheese to its most flavorful. Finally, he gets a few tips from the largest specialist cheese retailer in France, Pascal Beillevaire.
Online
2009
3.

Cheeses of Quebec [electronic resource]

Host Will Studd visits the Canadian province of Quebec to explore their cheese-making revival. He begins with Oka cheese, originally made by Trappist Monks in the city of the same name; this is one of the oldest, traditional cheeses still made in North America. Next he visits Ile-aux-Grues in the St Lawrence River, and learns how a commodity cheddar producer is adapting to the changing market. Then it's off to Montreal to visit a Benedictine monastery making Quebec's oldest blue cheese and a singing 'shepherd', before heading for the local markets, where he meets some of the main players in the burgeoning new cheese market.
Online
2009
4.

Cyprus [electronic resource]

Haloumi cheese is the world's best-loved grilled cheeses. Made with a mixture of goat's and sheep's milk, the mild briny flavor is a staple of Greek, Turkish, and Middles Eastern diets. Host Will Studd travels to Cyprus to see how traditional Haloumi is still made, as he visits one of the last farm producers still making the cheese from raw milk. Then Will tries the fresh, mild whey cheese known as Anari. Finally, he returns to his home in Melbourne and learns some delicious and unusual ways to prepare Haloumi cheese.
Online
2009
5.

Japan [electronic resource]

Host Will Studd and leading Australian chef Tetsuya Wakadu travel to Japan to learn if the Japanese like cheese. Their trip starts with a visit to Tokyo's best-known cheese shop, Fermier - located in the basement of the busy department store in Shibuya, where they discover the extraordinary range available. Next it's off to Shimizu Farm in Nagano to see how a traditional mountain cheese is made, and then to Yoshida Farm where they try their hand at cheese making. Chef Wakuda throws a party where he and his friends demonstrate new ways to cook with cheese, Japanese style, and Will visits the island of Hokkaido where washed rind cheese is carefully matured in underground cellars.
Online
2009
6.

Mozzarella and the Cheeses of Campania, Italy [electronic resource]

Italy's picturesque Campania region is famous for its stretched curd cheeses also known as pasta filata. Host Will Studd travels to the region and finds it hard to resist the lingering flavor and sensual texture of buffalo cheese made with raw milk, or conciato romano a sheep's milk cheese aged in terracotta jars, that dates back to the days of the Roman Empire. He also gets a lesson in wood-fired pizza making from a Countess. Then Will heads to the coast and learns about the traditional cow's milk, stretched curd cheese, caciocavallo or cheese on horseback. Finally, he visits the underground maturation rooms of Casa Madaio, where the finest examples of this cheese are aged.
Online
2009
7.

Portugal [electronic resource]

Until recently, Portugal's traditional sheep's milk cheeses were produced mostly for domestic consumption. Host Will Studd travels through the rugged mountains of the north to find out more about the king of Portuguese cheeses, Serra da Estrela. Originally produced in pre-Roman times, this ancient cheese is still made curdled with the juice of cardoon thistles. In the Azores, on the beautiful island of San Jorge, Will learns more about the benchmark cheeses of "little Switzerland".
Online
2009
8.

Artisan Cheeses of the USA [electronic resource]

In this episode, host Will Studd travels across America and finds artisanal cheese regions not normally associated with specialist cheese. First he learns about the challenges of making farmstead washed-rind cheese in Virginia, and then he's on to Zingerman's Creamery in Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Indiana, American goat cheese pioneer Judy Schad of Capriole dairy encourages Will to enjoy Bourbon in a new way. Saxelby Cheesemongers' stall at New York's public market is up next, and finally, Oregon where he discovers the fascinating story behind Rogue River Blue, one of the oldest raw milk blue cheeses in the country.
Online
2009
9.

The Champion of English Cheese [electronic resource]

In this episode, host Will Studd visits influential cheese retailer Neal's Yard Dairy in London, where cheese champion Randolph Hodgson explains how traditional English farmhouse cheese was saved from extinction. Will then looks at how these cheeses are made when he travels to the Midlands, Lancashire, Cheshire and Wensleydale, made famous by Wallace and Gromitt. Finally, he looks at the controversial raw milk blue cheese call Stichelton, and how its success may change the way Stilton is mode.
Online
2009
10.

Twins of the Mediterranean [electronic resource]: Corsica and Sardinia

Despite their close proximity to each other, Mediterranean Islands Corsica and Sardinia have distinctly different cheese traditions. Corsica is renowned for its soft sheep's milk cheese, Brocciu, but there is also Sartinese which is made with either sheep's or goat's milk, but then is left to age so that maggots can "whip" the texture. A short ferry ride to Sardinia and Will discovers the ancient curd cheese matured in a goat's stomach. Finally there is the authentic Sardinian Pecorino Sardo, hand made by shepherds and then smoked over an open fire.
Online
2009