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1.

Switzerland [electronic resource]: Mountain Cheese

Switzerland is famous for producing the finest mountain cheeses in the world, and three quarters of these are still made with raw milk. Host Will Studd samples Raclette and learns how it's made over a wood fire. Then he's off to the picturesque town of Gruyere to trace the origins of a cheese whose name literally means 'head monk'. A meeting with the king of Swiss cheese, Emmanthaler, finally answers the age old question; how does it get those holes?
Online
2006
2.

The Champion of English Cheese [electronic resource]

In this episode, host Will Studd visits influential cheese retailer Neal's Yard Dairy in London, where cheese champion Randolph Hodgson explains how traditional English farmhouse cheese was saved from extinction. Will then looks at how these cheeses are made when he travels to the Midlands, Lancashire, Cheshire and Wensleydale, made famous by Wallace and Gromitt. Finally, he looks at the controversial raw milk blue cheese call Stichelton, and how its success may change the way Stilton is mode.
Online
2009
3.

Twins of the Mediterranean [electronic resource]: Corsica and Sardinia

Despite their close proximity to each other, Mediterranean Islands Corsica and Sardinia have distinctly different cheese traditions. Corsica is renowned for its soft sheep's milk cheese, Brocciu, but there is also Sartinese which is made with either sheep's or goat's milk, but then is left to age so that maggots can "whip" the texture. A short ferry ride to Sardinia and Will discovers the ancient curd cheese matured in a goat's stomach. Finally there is the authentic Sardinian Pecorino Sardo, hand made by shepherds and then smoked over an open fire.
Online
2009
4.

Gorgonzola and Cave-Ripened Taleggio [electronic resource]: Italy

Italy is known for the long list of cheeses that it produces, and two of the better-known soft cheeses are Gorgonzola (the grandfather of all European blue cheeses), and Taleggio. On a visit to the Lombardy region of the country host Will Studd finds a maze of underground cellars in Novara is where seventy-percent of Gorgonzola is matured. In the Alps, at the municipality of Pasturo, the Mauri family ripens Taleggio in granite caves cooled by melting snow.
Online
2005
5.

The Goats' Cheese of Poitou [electronic resource]: France

European Union policy allows cheese makers from members of the Union to certify the country of origin. Most of the goat's cheese certified to be from France is produced in the Poitou region of the country. In this episode Will Studd visits the annual goat's cheese fair in the village of Sainte Maure de Touraine and hears from the local cheese judges to find out how to select the best. Next, it's on to a typical small farmhouse goat dairy before visiting France's largest goat's cheese producer, Eurial, to find out how the best-loved French chevre, Sainte Maure, is made.
Online
2005
6.

Pecorino Toscano [electronic resource]: Italy

In the Piedmont town of Bra, the Slow Food movement holds a cheese festival every other year. In this episode host Will Studd joins the more than one-hundred thousand attendees in examining the many international varieties on display, and learning about the movement's growing popularity. Next he's off to the Il Forteto dairy in Tuscany. Formed by a group of social reformers in the 1970s, this cooperative has rapidly grown to become one of Italy's largest producers of Pecorino Toscano, a benchmark cheese made from sheep's milk.
Online
2005
7.

Parmigiano Reggiano and Grana Padano [electronic resource]: Italy

One of the most popular Italian cheeses is Parmigiano Reggiano, known as Italy's big cheese; it's still made by hand in giant copper cauldrons. In this episode, host Will Studd meets two families that have been producing this cheese for generations, and learns about the extraordinary steps they take to control production. With visits to the farms and maturation rooms, Will witnesses the selection and ripening processes. Finally, we get a lesson on Parmigiano Reggiano's popular cousin, Grana Padano.
Online
2005
8.

Normandy Camembert [electronic resource]: France

The village of Camembert in the Normandy region of northern France produces one of the world's most popular cheeses. From the dairy of Monsieur Durand, the last farmhouse Camembert producer in region, to the cooperative of Isigny St Mere, one of the country's most respected producers of traditional raw milk Camembert; Will learns the processing secrets that have been used for generations. Finally, on a visit to the Paris cheese shop of Roland Barthelemy, who supplies the Elysee Palace, and an explanation of the differences between Camembert and its ancient cousin, Brie.
Online
2005
9.

Farmhouse Cheddar [electronic resource]: Somerset, England

Perhaps the world's most popular cheese, Cheddar cheese is produced in the village it is named for in southwest England. In this episode, Will Studd visits the area's famous gorge and caves before travelling to meet the Keen and Montgomery families, the last two farmhouse producers of cloth-bound raw milk cheddar. He then explores how the original cheese was made, including the all-important cheddaring process, and meets Randolph Hodgson, of the influential London cheese store Neal's Yard Dairy, to investigate how the best farmhouse cheddar is graded.
Online
2005
10.

Comté Gruyere and Farmhouse Morbier [electronic resource]

Comté Gruyere cheese has been produced in France for more than seven-hundred years, and is the most important cheese made under the strict French appellation system. In this episode, host Will Studd traces the link between farmer, cheese-maker, and affineur or ripener before visiting the old fort Saint Antoine where sixty-thousand crusty wheels are matured underground. He then visits a small farm to see how Comté's close cousin, Morbier, acquired its black stripe.
Online
2005
11.

Spanish Traditional Quesos [electronic resource]

Cheeses from Spain have recently gained popularity on the international market; with one particular cheese becoming very well known. In this episode, host Will Studd travels to the land of Don Quixote to learn about a rich sheep's milk cheese called Manchego. He then visits a cheese fair in the medieval city of Trujillo to savor another sheep's milk cheese, Queso de la Serena which is set with thistles. Finally, Will drives to the magnificent Picos Europa Mountains for a look at cave-ripened Cabrales and Valdeon cheeses.
Online
2005
12.

The Legend of Roquefort [electronic resource]

France's most popular blue cheese is Roquefort, which dates back to Roman times. Even today, blue cheeses throughout the world still rely on molds originating in the region's limestone caves. Host Will Studd travels to a typical hillside dairy learn about the area's unique breed of milking sheep before he visits the famous caves, where he is inducted into the Grand Order of Roquefort in a special ceremony.
Online
2005
13.

Australian Cheese Pioneers [electronic resource]

Australia has developed an efficient pasture-based dairy system which has allowed the country to achieve significant exports of cheddar, butter, and skimmed milk. The system has also allowed a small but passionate group of cheese-makers to introduce a unique range of farmhouse cheeses using cow, goat, sheep, and buffalo milk. In this episode we travel across this vast continent and meet five of these pioneers.
Online
2005
14.

Vermont Cheese [electronic resource]: USA

As the world leader in the production of industrial cheeses, the United States has seen a dramatic shift in consumer tastes and awareness. The organic food movement has been accompanied by a growing appreciation for traditional foods with a distinct local identity. Host Will Studd visits New York's finest cheese shop, before he heads to Vermont to meet a new generation of American cheese makers. These artisans are dedicated to creating an exciting and distinctive range of farmstead cheeses.
Online
2005
15.

Stilton [electronic resource]: The King of English Cheese

Known as the King of English Cheeses for more than two centuries, Stilton has never been copied anywhere else in the world. Despite the famous name, it has never been made in Stilton either. At historic Quenby Hall where the cheese was invented, we see how it is made and the origins of its outstanding reputation. Then a visit to the annual British Cheese Awards, where we find out which cheese-maker will be crowned the best producer of English blue cheese.
Online
2005
16.

The Basque [electronic resource]: Ossau Iraty Cheese

The Basques have the oldest language in Europe, and one of the most ancient cheeses. Host Will Studd visits the pretty village of Espelette, famous for its red peppers, then into the mountains to one of the few remaining shepherd huts where sheep are still milked by hand. The region is known for its sheep's milk cheese, which goes by many names, including Ossau Iraty in France, and Idiazabal in Spain. Learn the differences and get a glimpse of Basque culture.
Online
2006
17.

USA [electronic resource]: New Farmstead Cheeses of Northern California

In the United States, a backlash against mass-produced foods has led the Organic and Farm to Table movements. Freshly grown organic fruits and vegetables, foods produced from fresh local ingredients, and artisan and farmhouse cheeses have been at the forefront of these movements. In this episode, host Will Studd travels to Northern California to find out more about these products. Starting at the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market in San Francisco and heading north he calls on artisan cheese makers and catches up with one of the last traditional producers of Monterey Dry Jack, California's oldest and best-know cheese.
Online
2006
18.

Greece [electronic resource]: Feta, Food of the Gods

The ancient Greeks regarded cheese as the food of the gods, so it's little wonder that Greece has the world's highest per capita rate of cheese consumption. Host Will Studd travels to the rugged coast of Northern Greece to learn how wooden barrels play an essential role in maturing traditional Feta and how Manouri, an ancient whey cheese, is made. Then it's time for some hand-rolled filo pastry and homemade pita pies, followed by a trip to the largest Greek isle to sample some local cheese delicacies.
Online
2006
19.

France [electronic resource]: Massif Central and Auvergne

On the rugged plateau of Massif Central and Auvergne the rich green pastures are famous for the six benchmark AOC French cheeses, including three semi-hard varieties that date back to the twelfth-century. Host Will Studd learns how these three differ on a trip to an abandoned railway tunnel, where more than 3000 cheeses are now matured. Then it's off to a cow fair and the annual transhumance, or seasonal livestock migration, and the village of St Nectaire where a troglodyte dwelling full of cheese that is still matured on rye straw mats.
Online
2006
20.

Artisan Cheeses of the USA [electronic resource]

In this episode, host Will Studd travels across America and finds artisanal cheese regions not normally associated with specialist cheese. First he learns about the challenges of making farmstead washed-rind cheese in Virginia, and then he's on to Zingerman's Creamery in Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Indiana, American goat cheese pioneer Judy Schad of Capriole dairy encourages Will to enjoy Bourbon in a new way. Saxelby Cheesemongers' stall at New York's public market is up next, and finally, Oregon where he discovers the fascinating story behind Rogue River Blue, one of the oldest raw milk blue cheeses in the country.
Online
2009