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Cheese Slices
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1.

The Netherlands [electronic resource]

After France, the Netherlands is the second largest European exporter of cheese. In spite of that, they are widely known for only two types of cheese, Edam and Gouda. Host Will Studd visits the town of Edam, and gets a look at the cheese before it's covered in red wax. Then it's off to a Slow Food show in Rotterdam, where he discovers the cheeses that the Dutch keep to themselves. He also gets a look at how real farmhouse Gouda and Edam are made. On a trip to the beautiful island of Texel, he learns about a cheese that was once colored green with sheep droppings.
Online
2006
2.

Wisconsin, USA [electronic resource]

Wisconsin has long been known as the cheese capital of America, it's residents refer to themselves as 'cheese heads' and the region is known as Dairyland. This area produces more cheese that any other part of the country, but until recently the traditional cheese types were replaced by bland, mass-produced Swiss and Cheddar. Host Will Studd visits several new and exciting farmstead cheese producers, including Upland's Cheese Company, and Willi Leher, from Bleu Mont Dairy explains how he ripens cheese in an underground cave. Finally, Will heads for the hills for a look at Hidden Springs Creamery where a new organic sheep's milk cheese is being made with the help of the local Amish farmers.
Online
2009
3.

Brie From Brie and the French Affineur [electronic resource]

Brie is more than the mild, creamy, flat cheese, covered in pure white mold that you find in your grocery store these days. Authentic brie is produced in the Ile de France region and comes in different styles. Host Will Studd travels to the region to get a first hand look at the benchmark cheeses Brie de Meaux and Brie de Melun, before visiting Brie's close cousin, Chaource, in the Champagne region. Then it's on to the underground caves of Hervé Mons to find out how this respected affineur selects and matures cheese to its most flavorful. Finally, he gets a few tips from the largest specialist cheese retailer in France, Pascal Beillevaire.
Online
2009
4.

Cheeses of Quebec [electronic resource]

Host Will Studd visits the Canadian province of Quebec to explore their cheese-making revival. He begins with Oka cheese, originally made by Trappist Monks in the city of the same name; this is one of the oldest, traditional cheeses still made in North America. Next he visits Ile-aux-Grues in the St Lawrence River, and learns how a commodity cheddar producer is adapting to the changing market. Then it's off to Montreal to visit a Benedictine monastery making Quebec's oldest blue cheese and a singing 'shepherd', before heading for the local markets, where he meets some of the main players in the burgeoning new cheese market.
Online
2009
5.

Cyprus [electronic resource]

Haloumi cheese is the world's best-loved grilled cheeses. Made with a mixture of goat's and sheep's milk, the mild briny flavor is a staple of Greek, Turkish, and Middles Eastern diets. Host Will Studd travels to Cyprus to see how traditional Haloumi is still made, as he visits one of the last farm producers still making the cheese from raw milk. Then Will tries the fresh, mild whey cheese known as Anari. Finally, he returns to his home in Melbourne and learns some delicious and unusual ways to prepare Haloumi cheese.
Online
2009
6.

Japan [electronic resource]

Host Will Studd and leading Australian chef Tetsuya Wakadu travel to Japan to learn if the Japanese like cheese. Their trip starts with a visit to Tokyo's best-known cheese shop, Fermier - located in the basement of the busy department store in Shibuya, where they discover the extraordinary range available. Next it's off to Shimizu Farm in Nagano to see how a traditional mountain cheese is made, and then to Yoshida Farm where they try their hand at cheese making. Chef Wakuda throws a party where he and his friends demonstrate new ways to cook with cheese, Japanese style, and Will visits the island of Hokkaido where washed rind cheese is carefully matured in underground cellars.
Online
2009
7.

Mozzarella and the Cheeses of Campania, Italy [electronic resource]

Italy's picturesque Campania region is famous for its stretched curd cheeses also known as pasta filata. Host Will Studd travels to the region and finds it hard to resist the lingering flavor and sensual texture of buffalo cheese made with raw milk, or conciato romano a sheep's milk cheese aged in terracotta jars, that dates back to the days of the Roman Empire. He also gets a lesson in wood-fired pizza making from a Countess. Then Will heads to the coast and learns about the traditional cow's milk, stretched curd cheese, caciocavallo or cheese on horseback. Finally, he visits the underground maturation rooms of Casa Madaio, where the finest examples of this cheese are aged.
Online
2009
8.

Portugal [electronic resource]

Until recently, Portugal's traditional sheep's milk cheeses were produced mostly for domestic consumption. Host Will Studd travels through the rugged mountains of the north to find out more about the king of Portuguese cheeses, Serra da Estrela. Originally produced in pre-Roman times, this ancient cheese is still made curdled with the juice of cardoon thistles. In the Azores, on the beautiful island of San Jorge, Will learns more about the benchmark cheeses of "little Switzerland".
Online
2009
9.

Gorgonzola and Cave-Ripened Taleggio [electronic resource]: Italy

Italy is known for the long list of cheeses that it produces, and two of the better-known soft cheeses are Gorgonzola (the grandfather of all European blue cheeses), and Taleggio. On a visit to the Lombardy region of the country host Will Studd finds a maze of underground cellars in Novara is where seventy-percent of Gorgonzola is matured. In the Alps, at the municipality of Pasturo, the Mauri family ripens Taleggio in granite caves cooled by melting snow.
Online
2005
10.

The Goats' Cheese of Poitou [electronic resource]: France

European Union policy allows cheese makers from members of the Union to certify the country of origin. Most of the goat's cheese certified to be from France is produced in the Poitou region of the country. In this episode Will Studd visits the annual goat's cheese fair in the village of Sainte Maure de Touraine and hears from the local cheese judges to find out how to select the best. Next, it's on to a typical small farmhouse goat dairy before visiting France's largest goat's cheese producer, Eurial, to find out how the best-loved French chevre, Sainte Maure, is made.
Online
2005
11.

Parmigiano Reggiano and Grana Padano [electronic resource]: Italy

One of the most popular Italian cheeses is Parmigiano Reggiano, known as Italy's big cheese; it's still made by hand in giant copper cauldrons. In this episode, host Will Studd meets two families that have been producing this cheese for generations, and learns about the extraordinary steps they take to control production. With visits to the farms and maturation rooms, Will witnesses the selection and ripening processes. Finally, we get a lesson on Parmigiano Reggiano's popular cousin, Grana Padano.
Online
2005
12.

Pecorino Toscano [electronic resource]: Italy

In the Piedmont town of Bra, the Slow Food movement holds a cheese festival every other year. In this episode host Will Studd joins the more than one-hundred thousand attendees in examining the many international varieties on display, and learning about the movement's growing popularity. Next he's off to the Il Forteto dairy in Tuscany. Formed by a group of social reformers in the 1970s, this cooperative has rapidly grown to become one of Italy's largest producers of Pecorino Toscano, a benchmark cheese made from sheep's milk.
Online
2005
13.

Normandy Camembert [electronic resource]: France

The village of Camembert in the Normandy region of northern France produces one of the world's most popular cheeses. From the dairy of Monsieur Durand, the last farmhouse Camembert producer in region, to the cooperative of Isigny St Mere, one of the country's most respected producers of traditional raw milk Camembert; Will learns the processing secrets that have been used for generations. Finally, on a visit to the Paris cheese shop of Roland Barthelemy, who supplies the Elysee Palace, and an explanation of the differences between Camembert and its ancient cousin, Brie.
Online
2005
14.

Farmhouse Cheddar [electronic resource]: Somerset, England

Perhaps the world's most popular cheese, Cheddar cheese is produced in the village it is named for in southwest England. In this episode, Will Studd visits the area's famous gorge and caves before travelling to meet the Keen and Montgomery families, the last two farmhouse producers of cloth-bound raw milk cheddar. He then explores how the original cheese was made, including the all-important cheddaring process, and meets Randolph Hodgson, of the influential London cheese store Neal's Yard Dairy, to investigate how the best farmhouse cheddar is graded.
Online
2005
15.

Comté Gruyere and Farmhouse Morbier [electronic resource]

Comté Gruyere cheese has been produced in France for more than seven-hundred years, and is the most important cheese made under the strict French appellation system. In this episode, host Will Studd traces the link between farmer, cheese-maker, and affineur or ripener before visiting the old fort Saint Antoine where sixty-thousand crusty wheels are matured underground. He then visits a small farm to see how Comté's close cousin, Morbier, acquired its black stripe.
Online
2005
16.

Spanish Traditional Quesos [electronic resource]

Cheeses from Spain have recently gained popularity on the international market; with one particular cheese becoming very well known. In this episode, host Will Studd travels to the land of Don Quixote to learn about a rich sheep's milk cheese called Manchego. He then visits a cheese fair in the medieval city of Trujillo to savor another sheep's milk cheese, Queso de la Serena which is set with thistles. Finally, Will drives to the magnificent Picos Europa Mountains for a look at cave-ripened Cabrales and Valdeon cheeses.
Online
2005
17.

The Legend of Roquefort [electronic resource]

France's most popular blue cheese is Roquefort, which dates back to Roman times. Even today, blue cheeses throughout the world still rely on molds originating in the region's limestone caves. Host Will Studd travels to a typical hillside dairy learn about the area's unique breed of milking sheep before he visits the famous caves, where he is inducted into the Grand Order of Roquefort in a special ceremony.
Online
2005
18.

Australian Cheese Pioneers [electronic resource]

Australia has developed an efficient pasture-based dairy system which has allowed the country to achieve significant exports of cheddar, butter, and skimmed milk. The system has also allowed a small but passionate group of cheese-makers to introduce a unique range of farmhouse cheeses using cow, goat, sheep, and buffalo milk. In this episode we travel across this vast continent and meet five of these pioneers.
Online
2005
19.

Vermont Cheese [electronic resource]: USA

As the world leader in the production of industrial cheeses, the United States has seen a dramatic shift in consumer tastes and awareness. The organic food movement has been accompanied by a growing appreciation for traditional foods with a distinct local identity. Host Will Studd visits New York's finest cheese shop, before he heads to Vermont to meet a new generation of American cheese makers. These artisans are dedicated to creating an exciting and distinctive range of farmstead cheeses.
Online
2005
20.

Stilton [electronic resource]: The King of English Cheese

Known as the King of English Cheeses for more than two centuries, Stilton has never been copied anywhere else in the world. Despite the famous name, it has never been made in Stilton either. At historic Quenby Hall where the cheese was invented, we see how it is made and the origins of its outstanding reputation. Then a visit to the annual British Cheese Awards, where we find out which cheese-maker will be crowned the best producer of English blue cheese.
Online
2005