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Bridging World History
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1.

Early Empires [electronic resource]

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Through the Mongol empire, the Mali empire, and the Inca empire, examines the construction of empires, their administrative structures, legitimating ideologies, and the environmental and technological conditions that shaped them. Concludes with Peter Winn discussing the contradictory legacies of empires through the example of the Incas in modern day Peru.
Online
2004
2.

Transmission of Traditions [electronic resource]

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Islamic Spain, Korea, and West Africa provide examples of many different modes of cultural transmission, including oral, written, artistic, and architectural styles that are adopted internationally. Concludes with Richard W. Bulliet's views of the beneficial results of historical events that prevent the transmission of traditions, as exemplified in the expulsion of the Jews and Muslims from Spain.
Online
2004
3.

Family and Household [electronic resource]

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By examining families and households in West Asia, Europe, and China, demonstrates how the private experiences in world societies sometimes become a model for ordering the outside world. Also presents the view of women in Islam, Confucianism and Christianity. Jerry H. Bentley talks about the study of family history as a new area of historical interest and inquiry.
Online
2004
4.

Land and Labor Relationships [electronic resource]

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By studying the relationship between land availability and labor force, defines the factors that influenced how the land and its resources were exploited by pre-industrial economies. Peter Winn and Patrick Manning discuss the implications of the concurrent decline of slavery in Europe and expansion of slavery in European controlled areas of the Americas.
Online
2004
5.

Early Global Commodities [electronic resource]

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Explains that global trade was established by China's demand for silver and Spain's newly discovered mines in the America and that common currencies before that time were silver, gold, copper and shells. Candice Goucher talks about the reasons behind the continued use of regional currencies such as shells and beads even after the global spread of metals.
Online
2004
6.

Food, Demographics and Culture [electronic resource]

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Demonstrates how studying the production and consumption of food allows historians to uncover hidden levels of meaning in social relationships, understand demographic shifts, and trace cultural exchange. Examines the earliest impact of globalization including changing cuisine, environmental impacts, and the rise of forced labor as a global economic force. Candice Goucher discusses the fear that consumption of exotic and genetically modified foods disrupts the order of nature.
Online
2004
7.

Ideas Shape the World [electronic resource]

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Traces the impact of European Enlightenment ideals in the American and Haitian revolutions and in South America. Also examines the revitalization of Islam expressed in the Wahhabi movement as it spread from the Arabian peninsula to Africa and Asia. Sue Peabody speaks about the history of feminist thought as a "hidden history" within the history of ideas.
Online
2004
8.

Rethinking the Rise of the West [electronic resource]

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Seeks an explanation for why and how historical scholarship and the perspectives of historians change over time. Uses interpretations of reasons for the rise of the West as an example, isolating the importance of continguency, accident and conjecture in interpretations of World History. Historian William McNeill discusses the revision of history as a process experienced within the lifetime of an individual historian.
Online
2004
9.

Global Industrialization [electronic resource]

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Views the Industrial Revolution from a global point of view linking Cuba, Uruguay, Europe and Japan in an examination of the impact of Industry on trade, environment, culture, technology and lives around the world. Historian Jerry H. Bentley argues that the Industrial Revolution, rather than being purely a European process, was actually a global affair that drew on resources from all parts of the world.
Online
2004
10.

Imperial Designs [electronic resource]

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Examines the profound consequences of Imperalism in the South African frontier, Brazil, China and Japan, where politics, culture, industrial capitalism, and the environment were shaped and re-shaped. Historian Patrick Manning discusses the relationship between the concept of empire and powerful, multinational corporations.
Online
2004
11.

Global War and Peace [electronic resource]

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Examines Japanese imperialism, the Belgian Congo, and twentieth century peace institutions to study how local, national, ethnic, and religious conflicts shaped wars and their aftermaths in the 20th Century. Through the example of the Rwandan genocide of the 1990s, historian Patrick Manning discusses how conceptions of world order can create as well as prevent conflict.
Online
2004
12.

Colonial Identities [electronic resource]

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From Zanzibar to India, examines clothing as a clue to the effects of colonization and de-colonization. Historia Anand A. Yang talks about kashmiri shawls as an example of colonial appropriation of an indigenous item.
Online
2004
13.

People Shape the World [electronic resource]

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Examines the role of individual and collective action in shaping the world through the lives of such diverse figures as Mao Zedong, the Ayatollah Khomeini, and Las Madres de la Plaza de Mayo. Historian Susan Glosser uses the example of Mao Zedong to show how shifting perspectives on the past affect the way historical figures are remembered
Online
2004
14.

Globalization and Economics [electronic resource]

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Travels from the Soviet Union to Sri Lanka and Chile to study the role of technology and the impact of economic and political changes caused by globalization. Historian Michelle Kendrick compares the responses of societies to new technologies.
Online
2004
15.

Global Popular Culture [electronic resource]

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From World Cup soccer to Coca Cola, demonstrates that modern icons reflect the intertwined cultural, political, and commercial dimensions of globalization. Surveys the images of global production and consumption from reggae to the Olympics. Obo Addy speaks to the complex effects of the globalization of culture through his own story as a traditional African musician in a contemporary world.
Online
2004
16.

World History and Identity [electronic resource]

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Considers how global forces have redefined both individual and group identity in the modern world by examining the transnational identity that emerged in the Chinese diaspora, and comparing this to a newly re-defined national Chechen identity forged through war with Russia. Historians William McNeill, J.R. McNeill, and Heidi Roupp discuss the importance of understanding globalization, and the contributions the study of world history can make towards that end.
Online
2004
17.

Agricultural and Urban Revolutions [electronic resource]

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What do historians know about the earliest farmers and herders, and the evolution of cities? Newly emerging evidence about the "cradles of civilization" is examined in light of the social, technological, and cultural complexity of recently discovered settlements and cities. Archaeologist, Steve Weber, discusses the role of archaeology in the study of history, and how improvements in archaeological techniques affect our views of the past.
Online
2004
18.

Early Belief Systems [electronic resource]

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How did people begin to understand themselves in relation to the natural world and to the unseen realms beyond, and how was religion a community experience? In this unit, animism and shamanism in Shinto are contrasted with philosophical and ethical systems in early Greece and China, and the beginnings of Zoroastrianism, Hinduism, and Judaism. Candice Goucher talks about the ways in which historians evaluate prehistoric rock art to draw hypotheses about the nature of early religion.
Online
2004
19.

Order and Early Societies [electronic resource]

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Through the rise of the Chinese empire, Mayan regional kingdoms, and the complex society of Igbo Ukwu, this unit considers the origins of centralized bureaucratic empires, regional kingdoms and a decentralized way or ordering society. Linda Walton discusses the rise of gender inequality through the example of the Neolithic Hongshan culture of northeastern China, whose archeological sites contain remarkable evidence of important female imagery.
Online
2004
20.

The Spread of Religions [electronic resource]

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Shows how, as the missionaries, pilgrims, and converts of Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam moved around the world, the religions created change and were themselves changed. In conclusion, Linda Walton talks about the movement of religion via diasporas and the religious syncretism that follows.
Online
2004