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1.

Amendments 5 8 [electronic resource]: Justice Amendments

This program thoroughly analyzes the text of Amendments 5, 6, 7, and 8 to provide a complete understanding of the laws that are the foundation of the American criminal justice system. Specific rights outlined in the 5th Amendment that are explained include: the grand jury and indictment process, "double jeopardy," self-incrimination and "the right to remain silent," and due process of law. The rights guaranteed in the 6th Amendment for the accused in criminal prosecutions are discussed along with the procedures to be followed in criminal trials. The right of trial by jury in civil cases, bail procedures, and the elimination of excessive fines and cruel and unusual punishment as guaranteed in the 7th and 8th Amendments are discussed.
Online
2006; 1998
2.

The Bill of Rights [electronic resource]

It upholds freedom of speech and religion, guarantees a free press, grants the right to keep and bear arms, preserves the right of trial by jury, establishes states' rights, and more. It's the Bill of Rights. This program presents the ten key Constitutional amendments that have defined the fundamental liberties that are the American birthright-and examines the controversies and challenges they have withstood. Correlates to all applicable state and national standards. Recommended for middle school through college.
Online
2007
3.

Human Rights [electronic resource]

This program sets two crucial human rights-related Constitutional amendments within the context of their historical times: Amendment 13, abolishing slavery throughout the U.S., and Amendment 14, defining U.S. citizenship and stipulating due process and equal protection under the law. Four additional amendments-11, judicial powers construed; 16, federal income tax; and 18 and 21, Prohibition and its repeal-are included as well. Correlates to all applicable state and national standards. Recommended for middle school through college.
Online
2007
4.

Democracy in Action [electronic resource]

The ability to vote-to have a legal say in the affairs of America, large or small-is one of the greatest powers a U.S. citizen can have.and, too often, it's one of the most neglected. This program reemphasizes the value of universal suffrage through the stories of Amendments 15, 19, 23, 24, and 26, which, taken together, enfranchise citizens 18 years of age and older and forbid denying the vote on the basis of race, sex, locale, or tax arrears. Profiles of Amendments 12, 22, and 25 (the Presidential Amendments) and Amendments 17, 20, and 27 offer additional insights into how the principles of democracy are put to work. Correlates to all applicable state and national standards. Recommended for middle school through college.
Online
2008; 2007