You searched for:

Series
:
African Game
x
Subject
:
Africa, Sub-Saharan
x
Subject
:
Internet Videos
x
6 entries
Refine search
Browser-rss

Search Results:

Number
Remove Star
Title
Format
Year
Location & Availability
Call #
1.

Eradicating Eden [electronic resource]: Eco-Colonialism in Africa

Africa's rich biodiversity made the continent irresistible to 19th-century European powers, who exploited its resources and destroyed the natural harmony in which all its inhabitants had been living. Environmentalism is now in vogue but some say that stewardship campaigns are still shortsighted, focusing on "charismatic animals" and ignoring the needs of tribes forced into poaching as the end result of colonial-era ecological mismanagement. This program examines the conflict between the theory and the reality of wildlife protection with a look at eco-colonialism, a term used to describe ill-informed attempts by the West to influence Africa's conservation policies.
Online
2002
2.

The Promised Land [electronic resource]: Threats to Elephant Sanctuaries

When Africa's elephants were declared endangered it was estimated that more than 100 of the animals had been killed every day between 1979 and 1989. The decimation was blamed on poachers and civil wars, and while this was an accurate assessment for some regions, in others the loss was also due to habitat destruction at the hands of well-meaning environmentalists. International pressure to protect elephants had caused a population explosion on game reserves, with over-grazing ultimately creating wastelands out of several conservation areas. This program examines the depletion of natural resources in elephant sanctuaries and the devastating effect this has on all species within the reserves.
Online
2002
3.

Playing God [electronic resource]: Active Environmental Management

Should humans intervene when the animal population of a game reserve exceeds the ability of the reserve to sustain that population? Such overbreeding is inevitably followed by a population crash, which some environmentalists believe is part of a natural cycle that must not be tampered with and that others point to as validation for judicious culling of herds. This program goes to a game reserve in Zimbabwe, where rangers work with leopards, elephants, and lions, to demonstrate the active environmental management techniques that are necessary for the survival of all of the park's species.
Online
2002
4.

Living With Nature [electronic resource]: The Problem With Elephants

While conservationists advocate for African wildlife the continent's indigenous people are experiencing poverty in growing numbers. Many tribes have been reduced to a subsistence farming that can barely sustain them, and their desperate slash-and-burn methods only exacerbate a vicious cycle of agricultural degradation. An additional challenge is the threat posed by hungry elephants that trample settlements and destroy crops. Though it is illegal to kill the elephants some farmers feel they have little choice, especially as cash from selling the tusks helps keep their families alive. This program asserts that until nature protection groups address the needs of poor rural Africans, elephant poaching will continue.
Online
2002
5.

In Touch With Nature [electronic resource]: Saving Africa's Game Reserves

Ecotourism has been a boon to the African economy yet between shrinking budgets and environmental challenges, game reserves are struggling. Should the parks be allowed to raise funds through animal utilization programs? Many game parks have already amassed great quantities of tusks from unavoidable elephant deaths but official policy and public opinion prevent their sale. This program explores the financial and ecological problems faced by African safari parks and, citing conditions at Chobe National Park, argues that misguided sentimentalism on the part of "animal rights fanatics" is having a harmful effect. The video also explains why banning the sale of ivory has not put an end to poaching.
Online
2002
6.

A Vision for the Future [electronic resource]: Species Protection in Africa

Due to a continuing loss of habitat, Africa is rapidly losing its biodiversity. Conservation efforts have been hampered by disputes between supporters of sustainable use and animal rights lobbyists, although a number of controversial programs have been put into place. Cheetahs are now bred successfully in captivity but activists object to the selling of offspring to zoos. Very impactful and very contentious has been the establishment of game farms that generate income from trophy hunting. This video describes these programs along with some initiatives that benefit impoverished farmers and animals both, including an innovative project that puts ex-poachers in charge of protecting wildlife.
Online
2002