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A Walk Through the 20th Century With Bill Moyers
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Moyers, Bill D.
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1.

Marshall, Texas [electronic resource]

In this program, Bill Moyers returns to his hometown of Marshall, Texas-discovering, in his words, "a new town perched on the memory of one that's gone." Today it is hoped and expected that all of Marshall's citizens, regardless of racial background, share the responsibilities of living and working in a small town. But there was a time in recent history when the opposite was assumed and accepted, when there were two Marshalls-one black, one white. The town was made up of "two worlds," says Moyers, and yet they were both "waiting for an event." The time was the 1960s and the event was the Civil Rights movement.
Online
2010; 1984
2.

The Arming of the Earth [electronic resource]

The 20th century began with enormous hopes for a future made safe and humane by technology. Although it realized some of these hopes, the century neared its end under the shadow of superweapons that still threaten the earth with annihilation. In this program, Bill Moyers traces the evolution of three instruments that enabled combatants to mass-produce death-the machine gun, the submarine, and the bomber plane. Each weapon helped to close the gap between soldier and target, regardless of whether that target was another soldier or an innocent civilian. And each was introduced with the promise that it would end war by making it too terrible to endure.
Online
2010; 1984
3.

The Reel World of News [electronic resource]

In 1911, the first newsreels flickered in America's nickelodeons. In the mid-1960s, they vanished from movie theaters as nightly television newscasts came to dominate visual journalism. In between, newsreels grew into a unique 20th-century institution that informed and entertained whole generations. In this program, Bill Moyers conducts a tour of the cultural and political landscape so dramatically rendered by the American newsreel. Accompanied by a rich tapestry of archival clips, Moyers talks with the announcers, composers, and cameramen who still relish memories of jostling and hustling to catch the parade of history on film.
Online
2010; 1984
4.

Come to the Fairs [electronic resource]

Out of the tradition of the great 19th-century European trade exhibitions came a 20th-century American phenomenon, one that provided recreation, inspiration, and what amounted to a cultural barometer-the World's Fair. At the time this classic program was produced, the United States had hosted nine of them, from the Chicago World's Fair of 1893 to the sprawling 1982 celebration in Knoxville, Tennessee. Presented by Bill Moyers, the video explores the many ways in which these global festivities have reflected-not always by design-America's changing views about the world and the future.
Online
2010; 1984
5.

The Second American Revolution: Part 1 [electronic resource]

For African-Americans, the 20th century was fraught with contrasts. There was the glowing promise of equality in the nation's charters and there was the actual bigotry that shadowed and shrank that promise. In this program, Bill Moyers is joined by a distinguished couple who have long spoken for black aspirations-Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee. Together they re-create, in dramatic dialogue and often in original settings, the world of 20th-century black America, which was, in both its highs and lows, a world filled with signposts about America itself. This episode covers the African-American struggle from 1900 to 1920.
Online
2010; 1984
6.

The Second American Revolution: Part 2 [electronic resource]

The year 1954 can now be seen as a clarifying point of convergence in American history. Among other things, it was the year that brought the Supreme Court's decision to outlaw racial segregation in the schools of the United States. In this program, Bill Moyers, Ossie Davis, and Ruby Dee tell the story of how the New Deal, World War II, and postwar social changes set the stage for a long-awaited and hard-fought legal assault on the fortresses of segregation. The video also shows how the victory of 1954 sparked a decade of continuing nonviolent revolution that culminated in the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
Online
2010; 1984
7.

World War II [electronic resource]: The Propaganda Battle

The outbreak of World War II saw two motion picture experts from Germany and the United States battle each other with as much ferocity as any army or navy. Their respective missions: to ignite a public desire to wage and win a global conflict. This Bill Moyers program contains an interview with Fritz Hippler, chief filmmaker for the Nazi Party. Hippler unrepentantly claims to have spoken to the "soul of the masses" through films like The Eternal Jew, which asserted a righteous justification for genocide. Moyers also discusses America's response, which put a renowned filmmaker to work for the Allied cause-director Frank Capra, noted for his gentle, humane films about ordinary folk standing up to oppression.
Online
2010; 1984
8.

America on the Road [electronic resource]

In 1908, the first Model T rolled off the assembly line, quickly asserting itself as a dream machine that would take America down the highway and into the future. Bill Moyers shows how that future represented not only a new landscape bustling with high-speed transport and travel, but a new vision of ourselves. He uses film clips, photographs, music, and poetry to trace America's transformation into a mobile culture, complete with shopping malls, fast food, suburbia, carhops, drag strips, pollution, traffic jams, and-at the time this high-energy visual document was produced-a manufacturing-based economy.
Online
2010; 1984
9.

I. I. Rabi [electronic resource]: Man of the Century

Innovation enabled the United States to take on the mantle of world leadership-most importantly, innovation in military technology. But among the great minds that drove American innovation, using science to make war sometimes led to questions, dilemmas, and even second thoughts. In this program, Bill Moyers presents a profile of I. I. Rabi, winner of the 1944 Nobel Prize in physics and an early developer of radar for use in World War II. Rabi also participated in the Manhattan Project and was present at the detonation of the first atomic bomb-an event which transformed him into an advocate for restraint in the use of nuclear power.
Online
2010; 1984
10.

The 30-Second President [electronic resource]

No single force has changed American politics more than television-especially the television commercial. In this program, Bill Moyers examines the phenomenon of the "30-second president" and the role of advertising in 20th-century American politics. The video features an interview with Rosser Reeves, an advertising executive who worked on early political television campaigns for Dwight D. Eisenhower. Moyers also talks with media pioneer Tony Schwartz, whom Marshall McLuhan regarded as a fellow guru of the electronic age, for further insight into the impact of television on electoral politics.
Online
2010; 1984
11.

The Twenties [electronic resource]

Conventional wisdom enshrines the 1920s as the decade that roared-a time in which Americans kicked up their heels to the Charleston and went for one long joyride before the Wall Street crash of 1929. As this Bill Moyers program illustrates, those things did happen, but so did many others-not all of them fondly remembered. Nineteen Americans who lived through those years talk about their lives in the 1920s. From labor strikes to the Scopes trial to the executions of Sacco and Vanzetti. from poverty to racial segregation to political scandals. Moyers and his guests reveal the complex realities behind the glitter of the times.
Online
2010; 1984
12.

Out of the Depths [electronic resource]: The Miner's Story

Danger has always surrounded the coal miner's profession, but in the early years of the Colorado coal fields, it was almost as risky for a worker to stay above ground and face the wrath of the company as it was to toil in the tunnels below. This Bill Moyers program presents the memories of the people who worked those mines, freeing the rocks, metals, and minerals on which much of 20th-century American industry was founded. The depths of their struggles are revealed as they recall the deplorable conditions in which they labored and the events which led to the legendary 1913 United Mine Workers' strike as well as the infamous 1914 Ludlow Massacre.
Online
2010; 1984
13.

Change, Change [electronic resource]

As this Bill Moyers program makes clear, television became another member of the family in the 1960s, both reflecting and influencing the era. The times were chaotic and TV whirled us into that chaos while also holding up a mirror to it: the assassination and funeral of John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Apollo moon landing, the saga of the Civil Rights movement and Martin Luther King, Jr. So swiftly was change upon us in the decade of the 60s, so swiftly did the landmarks pass, that all these years later it seems a ride through great upheaval and great promise-some of which was realized and some of which was impossible to fulfill.
Online
2010; 1984