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A Fondo-in Their Own Words
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1.

Raphael

The Spanish singer Rapahel began his career in 1962. His recording history includes: 326 gold albums, 49 platinum albums, and the only uranium record. His albums reached worldwide sales of over 50 million copies. Raphael performed on some of the world's biggest stages including: Carnegie Hall, Radio City Music Hall, Madison Square Garden, and the Kennedy Center in Washington DC.
Online
2016; 1977
2.

Arthur Rubinstein

Arthur Rubinstein became world famous for his interpretations of Chopin piano music. With the German invasion in World War II, he moved to the United States, where he was nationalized in 1946. Rubinstein's optimistic mindset is reflected in the vitality of his performances. He felt at ease in classicism and romanticism, and had an unmistakable sound.
Online
2016; 1977
3.

Chabuca Granda

Chabuca Granda is a Peruvian singer and lyricist. Her voice and vast work extended beyond the borders of her country. One of her best-known songs is The Cinnamon's Flower.
Online
2016; 1977
4.

Libertad Lamarque

Libertad Lamarque (1908-2000). The singer and actress Libertad Lamarque, was an icon of the Golden Age. She discusses the 1938 musical film Madreselva (Honeysuckle)and from "the bride of the romantic tango, always feminine" we hear: I am Crazy about the Horns of Cars and The Girl of the Seventeen. She recounts her trajectory in the theater, musical comedy, and her tours of America.
Online
2016; 1976
5.

Manuel Vázquez Montalbán

Vázquez Montalbán was a poet, journalist and novelist. His novels about the detective Pepe Carvalho have been widely distributed, including several English translations.
Online
2016; 1979
6.

Jorge Semprún

Jorge Semprún Maura (December 10, 1923 - June 7, 2011) was a Spanish writer, intellectual, politician and screenwriter, whose work was written mostly in French. He was Minister of Culture in Spain between 1988 and 1991, under the government of Felipe González, and a leader of the Spanish Communist Party, under the pseudonym Federico Sánchez; he was expelled in 1964. His experience in the concentration camp of Buchenwald marked the character of his entire work; he published The Second Death of Sánchez in 1977, earning the Planet Award. Semprún passed away in Paris in June of 2011.
Online
2016; 1977
7.

Francisco Ayala

Francisco Ayala is a Spanish-American novelist and university professor. During the Spanish civil war, he was exiled first to Buenos Aires and then the United States. In the 1970s, Ayala investigated genetic variation and natural selection at the molecular level, and throughout his career, defended the teaching of evolution in public schools.
Online
2016; 1977
8.

Severo Ochoa

Severo Ochoa was a Spanish scientist of international renown; he became an American citizen in 1956. In 1959, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (shared with American scientist Arthur Kornberg) for his important work on the metabolism of nucleic acids and the discovery of the enzyme polynucleotide phosphorylase.
Online
2016; 1976
9.

Mario Benedetti a Fondo

Mario Benedetti published over 80 books with more than 1,200 editions translated into 25 languages. His work covers various genres: poetry, short stories, novels, essays and literary criticism. His political positions forced him to leave Uruguay, beginning exile in Buenos Aires, then on to Peru, where he was arrested, deported, and installed in Cuba in 1976. The following year, Benedetti moved to Madrid.
Online
2016; 1978
10.

Jorge Edwars a Fondo

Jorge Edwards was an author, lawyer, journalist, and Chilean diplomat. Throughout his career he held different diplomatic positions: executive business in Havana (1970-1971) and minister counselor in Paris (1971-1973) where he was under the command of Pablo Neruda. After the coup in Chile, he moved to Barcelona where he worked as a consultant in Seix Barral and published Persona Non Grata (1973). He is the author of numerous novels, short stories and essays.
Online
2016; 1976
11.

Alberto Sordi

Alberto Sordi (Rome, 1920 - 2003) is an Italian actor, director, and screenwriter. Along with Marcello Mastroianni, Ugo Tognazzi, Nino Manfredi, and Vittorio Gassman, Sordi was one of the great names of the commedia all'italiana; he was also spokesman of the Romany in Italian cinematography. Between 1952 and 1955, Sordi achieved stardom within the world of cinema with The White Sheikh (1952) and The Useless (1953). In 1977, he starred in A Little Bourgeois Piccolo with Shelley Winters and Romolo Valli. He received five Nastro d'Argento awards and seven David di Donatello awards, and in 1995 won the Golden Lion for his film career at the Venice Film Festival.
Online
2016; 1979
12.

Madre Teresa de Calcuta

Agnes Gonxha was an Indian Catholic nun of Albanian origin who founded the Missionaries of Charity in Calcutta in 1950. For over 45 years she served the poor, sick, orphaned, and dying while guiding the expansion of her congregation. After her death, she was beatified by Pope John Paul II and given the title Blessed Teresa of Calcutta. She won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979.
Online
2016; 1980
13.

Antonio di Benedetto

Antonio Di Benedetto (1922, Mendoza - 1986, Buenos Aires) was an Argentine journalist and writer of Italian descent. He began to study law but later dedicated himself to journalism, becoming deputy director of the newspaper Los Andes. Di Benedetto began to write in his adolescence and came to occupy an outstanding place in contemporary Argentine narrative. Di Benedetto published his first book in 1953, Animal World, a volume of stories. Later he wrote five novels, the most famous of which is Zama. He published El Silencieroin 1964 and Los Suicidas in1969. During the last civil-military dictatorship, he was persecuted, imprisoned, and tortured, and finally released on September 4, 1977. He left the country and went into exile in Europe, returning to Argentina in 1984.
Online
2016; 1978
14.

Julián Marías

Julián Marías Aguilera (Valladolid, Madrid, 2005) earned a PhD in Philosophy at the University of Madrid and was a disciple of Ortega y Gasset. Although an outstanding essayist and distinguished philosopher, Marías did not teach in the Franco's Spanish University due to ideological discrepancies; he was a lecturer in Europe and America. His presence in the Spanish intellectual world has been constant: he collaborated with relevant newspapers, was a member of the Royal Academy, and a senator by royal appointment. He presided over the Foundation for Sociological Studies from its creation in 1979 until his death. In 1974, he published The Social Justice and other Justices and in 1996, received the Prince of Asturias Award for Communication and Humanities, shared with Indro Montanelli.
Online
2016; 1976
15.

Ennio Morricone

During his career, Ennio Morricone worked with several forms of musical composition: first as orchestrator and conductor in the recording field, then as a composer for theater, radio, television, and film. He made music for more than 400 films working with various Italian and international directors such as Gillo Pontecorvo , Bernardo Bertolucci, Giuseppe Tornatore, Brian De Palma, Roman Polanski, Adrian Lyne, Oliver Stone, Roland Joffe, and Quentin Tarantino. Morricone earned Oscar nominations for several films including Terrence Malick's Days of Heaven and Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight.
Online
2016; 1980
16.

Juan Manuel Fangio

Juan Manuel Fangio (Balcarce, 1911 - Buenos Aires, 1995), son of Italian immigrants, was an Argentine car racer. The “Chueco” is considered one of the best drivers of the world motorsport of all the times, in particular for being quintuple champion of Formula 1 with four different teams. In 1958, in Batista's Cuba, a command of the 26 de Julio Movement, led by Fidel Castro, kidnapped him for 26 hours.
Online
2016; 1976
17.

Julio Iglesias

Julio Iglesias is a Latin singer, songwriter, and record producer. In 1976, he performed at Madison Square Garden, in New York where he set a box office record. In 1983, he entered the Guinness Book of World Records for having sold the most records in the most languages in history. Iglesias is one of the most popular Latin artists of all time.
Online
2016; 1981
18.

José Luis de Vilallonga

José Luis de Vilallonga Cabeza de Vaca, IX marquis de Castellbell (Madrid, 1920 - Andratx, Mallorca, 2007) was an aristocrat, writer and Spanish actor. He rejected the diplomatic career that his family wanted him to follow and thanks to his contacts, had the opportunity to make friends with many celebrities of the political and artistic world. He participated in over 70 films including Lovers of Louis Malle and Breakfast with Diamonds (Breakfast at Tiffany's, 1961). He published Allegro barbaro in 1978 and La nostalgia es un error in 1980. He was spokesman of the Democratic Board during the Transition and wrote an authoritative biography of Juan Carlos I, El Rey. Perhaps his best work is the four volume autobiography, Unauthorized Memoirs.
Online
2016; 1980
19.

Manuel Mújica Láinez

Manuel Mujica Láinez, the author of Bomarzo (1962), considers himself as "the result of two families who lost everything, except what you have had the good taste to call wit." He worked closely with writers like Bioy Casares, Silvina and Victoria Ocampo, and Borges- "Both, Georgie and I, we've been very anti-Peronists. I struggled not to imitate him." The author of La casa (The House - 1954) and El Laberinto (The Labyrinth - 1974) says, with dreadful irony, about Spanish literature and other Latin American writers: "I try to be kind, but sometimes I can not".
Online
2016; 1977
20.

Milan Kundera

Czech-born French writer Milan Kundera grants A Fondo a rare interview. Since 1975, Kundera has been living in France after being exiled from Czechoslovakia. In 1979, he published The Book of Laughter and Forgetting and shortly thereafter released his highly successful The Unbearable Lightness of Being.
Online
2016; 1980