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1.

Disaster Tech

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See how man's folly, pride, and stupidity led to some of the Wild West's worst catastrophes.
Online
2008; 2004
2.

Revenge Tech

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"It's said revenge is a dish best served cold, but in the Wild West, it was also ladled out with surprising invention and cruelty. From a liver-eating madman bent on avenging the death of a loved one to a teenage girl who switched her gender to exact vengeance on her husband's murderer, technology made a uniquely brutal form of frontier justice possible"--The History Channel website.
Online
2005
3.

Massacres II

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Heavily armed, surrounded by a vast and unknown wilderness, and subject to attack from the people who had lived there for centuries, Western settlers often found themselves fighting for their lives ... examines four of the most brutal such episodes: the Camp Grant Massacre in Tucson, Arizona in April 1871, when 140 Apache men, women and children were slain in their sleep; the 1836 Goliad Massacre in Texas, when Mexican soldiers killed over 300 Texans; the Council House Massacre in San Antonio, where Comanches succumbed to a deadly volley of gunfire; and the Dragoon Springs Massacre in 1858 which saw stage company workers killed for unknown reasons.
Online
2005
4.

Grim Reaper

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"Examines how settlers met their deaths. Technology, in particular, played a hand. The reaper, for example, was responsible for the passing of many. As it sped up harvesting, it increased the speed at which farm workers were maimed--or worse. Then there were trains, wild animals, and "friendly" innkeepers, who in the end, weren't so nice"--The History Channel website.
Online
2005
5.

Execution Tech

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Host Keith Carradine describes the methods of executing criminals on the frontier. Discusses the 6 man gallows built at the Fort Smith courthouse, the proper way to tie a hangman's knot and the "drop distance table" for effective hanging. The "twitchup" gallows, the infamous El Paso "double header" with two men hung on one rope, the Julian gallows which worked without a hangman, as well as firing squads and the automatic "execution machine" are covered. Also described is the first electrocution by electric chair.
Online
2004